Chicago Versus Afghanistan: Statistics Prove ‘Gun Control’ Doesn’t Make Americans Safer

Those calling for more restrictions on gun ownership in the United States need only compare Chicago to Afghanistan for proof that so-called “gun control” laws don’t make Americans safer.

Afghanistan Safe Than Chicago in 2012

 

According to a WBEZ.org report published Dec. 28, officials with the Chicago Police Department confirmed that Chicago had reached the 500-murders milestone with three days remaining in the calendar year.   Conversely, http://icasualties.org reported 309 American deaths in Afghanistan with two days to go in 2012.

Should we expect residents of Chicago, home to some of the strictest gun laws in the nation, to be moving to Afghanistan soon?  Of course not!  Thanks to the national news media’s anti-gun bias, most will never know that Chicago had 191 more killings than did the entire nation of Afghanistan.

SEE ALSO:  I shared a similar report three and a half years ago.

UPDATE 12/30/2012 at 6:42 p.m. Central:  More evidence of anti-gun bias seen in national news media’s failure to report on another Aurora, Colo.-style theater shooting that was thwarted by a good guy with a gun.

UPDATE 1/01/2013 AT 5:42 p.m. Central:  According to another source, Chicago tallied 532 murders during 2012.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

 

This entry was posted in Afghanistan, Chicago, Limited Government, Second Amendment and tagged , , , by BobMcCarty. Bookmark the permalink.

About BobMcCarty

A native of Enid, Oklahoma, Bob McCarty graduated from Oklahoma State University with a degree in journalism in 1984. During the next two decades, he served stints as an Air Force public affairs officer, a political campaign manager, a technology sales consultant and a public relations professional. Today, Bob spends most of his time researching topics, writing about them and publishing those writings. When he’s not writing online, he’s working as an author. Bob’s first published book, Three Days In August: A U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier’s Fight For Military Justice (October 2011), chronicles the life story and wrongful conviction of Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart, a highly-decorated Green Beret combat veteran. In his second book, THE CLAPPER MEMO (May 2013), Bob connects the dots between a memo signed by James R. Clapper Jr. — the man now serving as our nation’s top intelligence official — and the deaths of dozens of Americans in Afghanistan at the hands of our so-called Afghan “allies” wearing the uniforms of their nation’s military, police and security forces. Bob is married, has three sons and lives in the St. Louis area. Bob is available for media and blogger interviews. Simply drop a comment here, leaving your name, organization, phone number, e-mail address and area of interest. He’ll try to respond as soon as possible.

3 thoughts on “Chicago Versus Afghanistan: Statistics Prove ‘Gun Control’ Doesn’t Make Americans Safer

  1. Please be honest…. Far more deaths in Afghanistan, they just aren’t Americans. Also, the Americans over in Afghanistan are far better trained than most gun owners in Chicago. So, this analogy is wholly inaccurate and comparing apples to oranges, and I am against taking any law abiding citizen’s guns away. I just want honest conversations, rather than gimmicky crap like this.

  2. The truth? The truth that Chicago is more densely populated than any city in Afghanistan? The truth that Americans in Afghanistan are far more trained in handling weapons than the average Chicago gun owner? The truth that far more people die in Afghanistan than in Chicago (somehow Afghans who die at the end of gun don’t count?)? What truth, exactly, is it that I cannot handle?

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