Category Archives: Three Days In August

My Answer Hasn’t Changed After Four Years

Almost every time I give a media interview about my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August: A U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier’s Fight For Military Justice, I’m asked why I wrote it. My answer goes something like this: “I believe Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart, the man whose life is chronicled in the book, deserves a new trial.” Then I explain why.

SFC Kelly A. Stewart (Army) and CMSgt. John Stewart (USAF Ret.)

SFC Kelly A. Stewart (Army) and CMSgt. John Stewart (USAF Ret.)

Below is the long version of my explanation that I wrote down and published in November 2011, one month after Three Days In August was released. It’s the explanation I still offer today:

On March 30, 2010, I came across something about the case of SFC Stewart, a Green Beret who had been convicted and sentenced to eight years in prison after being accused of raping and kidnapping a German woman.

Though I cannot recall or locate whatever it was exactly that made me aware of SFC Stewart’s case, I did keep records of what transpired from that day forward. It began with an email to the Soldier’s father, CMSgt. John Stewart (USAF Ret.), in which I wrote two words: Call me.

During the days and weeks that followed, Chief Stewart forwarded everything he could about the case. In addition, he helped me secure an authenticated copy of the Record of Trial and encouraged me to read it. If, after reading the complete ROT, I didn’t think something had gone horribly wrong with SFC Stewart’s case, Chief Stewart said he would respect my decision.

It didn’t take long, however, for me to conclude that SFC Stewart had indeed become a victim of military justice gone awry.

During the next 12 months, I gathered other documentation, discussed the case with others with close ties to the case and wrote as much as I could write based upon the case records. Then my work on the book took a completely different turn.

On March 31, 2011, SFC Stewart was released from the U.S. Military Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., the result of having his sentence reduced to three years and being released on probation after serving 19 months behind bars.

Soon after his release, I was talking with him by phone.

Before it was over, I had interviewed him multiple times, spending more than a dozen hours on the phone and exchanging countless emails — as the only writer, reporter or media person with whom he agreed to discuss the case.

The rest is history.

Based on extensive interviews and offering never-before-published details about the case, Three Days In August paints a portrait of military justice gone awry that’s certain to make your blood boil.

You can learn more about the book and read its endorsements at ThreeDaysInAugust.com. Likewise, you can order a copy by clicking here or on the graphic below.

To read about other military justice cases I’ve followed, click here.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

TDIA Book Excerpt: ‘I Wasn’t Going To Be That Dog’

Despite the fact prosecutors presented no evidence or eyewitnesses, members of a U.S. Army court-martial panel found Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart guilty of sexually assaulting a 29-year-old German woman with whom he admitted having had a one-night stand one year earlier. Below is an excerpt from my book, Three Days In August, about what happened in the life of this elite Green Beret after he was railroaded by the politically-correct military justice system:

Click on image above to order book.

Click on image above to order book.

“So, they find me guilty. It’s late at night. In an instant, my whole life got flushed right down the toilet,” said Stewart, recalling the verdict that changed his life just before midnight on August 19, 2009. “I am smart enough to know that my life is screwed. The rest of my life.  No matter what. My life is done.

“Clearly, I felt that I was shafted, and I knew there was no way to fix it,” he explained. “This is an analogy I use. It might come across as messed up, but this is my analogy, and this is why I chose to do what I did.

“I was not going to have everybody do prison time with me,” said Stewart, recalling his thoughts after a court-martial panel found him guilty of sex crimes against a German woman and handed down a sentence that included a reduction in rank, from E-7 to E-1, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, eight years of confinement and a recommendation for dishonorable discharge upon release.

“I wasn’t going to go to prison and have my kids have to go through having their dad in prison and my wife having to stand by my side and go without a husband for years—and, at that time, I didn’t know the length of the years,” said Stewart, a Special Forces combat medic and Level One-trained sniper. “I didn’t know the length of my sentence; I just knew that I was found guilty.”

Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart's uniform was covered with signs of his life as a Top One Percent Special Forces Soldier. Click on image above to order book.

Kelly A. Stewart’s uniform was covered with signs of his life as a Top One Percent Special Forces Soldier.

That’s when he made a decision.

“I never thought I was going to prison,” Stewart said. “When I got back after (being convicted), I had a reality check in the hotel room” at the Krystal Inn, the on-post hotel where he was staying near the court building where his trial was taking place at Rose Barracks in Vilseck, Germany.

About the only plans he made took place during the last intermission in the courtroom before his guilty verdict was announced. After calling his wife and telling her he wouldn’t be coming home soon, Stewart also called his military-friendly bank, USAA, and transferred all of the money in his account into his wife’s account.

“I already knew what I was gonna do,” he recalled.

Back in their room at the Krystal Inn, Stewart and his buddy, Sergeant First Class Detrick Hampton, laid in their beds and talked most of the night until Sergeant Hampton fell asleep around 5 a.m. Less than an hour later, Stewart began to implement his hastily-crafted plan.

Careful not to wake Sergeant Hampton, Stewart got up out of his bed about an hour later, put on his Army Combat Uniform and low-quarter shoes and collected a few items—including a combat knife and a rubber band—he thought he might need. Oddly, he left his black Army jump boots in the room.

Kelly Stewart on a gun truck in Iraq.

Kelly Stewart on a gun truck in Iraq.

Quietly, he walked out of his second-floor room at the Krystal Inn where, even after he was found guilty, he was not kept under guard—an indication, perhaps, that some in the Army still didn’t think he was as dangerous as the charges, eventual conviction and news media coverage of his case might have indicated. He had, after all, never been deemed a danger to others or a flight risk.

Because he had not planned to go away for a long time, Stewart didn’t prepare by gathering lots of clothes, money and 16 passports. Instead, he ensured only that he had enough money for gas to go where he needed to go to take his own life. And with three combat tours in Iraq and other stints in Kosovo and Macedonia under his belt, he knew enough about medicine to make it happen.

Once outside the hotel room, Stewart walked the short distance to a staircase in the center of the building, down a single flight of stairs and through an open-air hallway out to the parking lot where his rental car, an Audi Q5, was parked.

He drove the SUV a short distance to the Shoppette—the name the Army and Air Force Exchange Service gives its convenience stores located on military installations—where he purchased a laundry list of items:  three 50-count bottles of Tylenol caplets, one 72-count package of Sominex tablets, two 16-ounce bottles of Gatorade Riptide Rush, some writing paper and a couple of pencils.”

Find out what happened next in the life of this man who sacrificed so much for his country only to be betrayed! Order a copy of Three Days In August.

To read other articles about the the wrongful prosecution of Sergeant Stewart, including one about a post-trial statement that should have netted him a new trial, click here.

To read about other cases of military justice run amok, click here.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Order My Books, and Send Me Your Photos!

I love it when people show their support for my work the way one man from Tennessee did after purchasing all three of my titles as eBooks at Amazon.com. Steve Jennings sent me a photo of my books as they appeared as “purchased titles” on his Kindle screen!

Click on the image above to order copies of my books at Amazon.com.

Click on the image above to order copies of my books at Amazon.com.

In case you’re new to my work and not familiar with the titles shown in the photo, let me bring you up to date: I’ve written two nonfiction books, Three Days In August (October 2011) and The Clapper Memo (May 2013), that seem to appeal to law enforcement, military and intelligence folks as well as one crime-fiction novel, The National Bet (November 2014) and a romantic-comedy screenplay, “Apply Inside,” the first 30 pages of which can be found here.

To learn more about each of the books, just  visit BobMcCarty.com and click on the tab at the top that corresponds with the title of the book in which you’re interested.

If you’ve purchased one or more of my books, take a photo of yourself holding the book(s) or eBooks on a tablet, phone or other screen and then send it to me via email message to bobmccartywrites (at) gmail (dot) com or send me a friend request on Facebook and then forward the photo via Facebook message. After I receive it, I might share it on my website and with folks in my social media universe. Thanks in advance!

P.S. My books make great Christmas gifts and signed copies are available. To learn how to obtain signed copies, click here.

UPDATE 11/14/2015 at 11 a.m. Central: Take a look at the latest “glamour shot” of one of my readers, Ivan Nikolov, shown (below) holding up his copy of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo. Thanks, Ivan!

Facebook friend Ivan Nikolov holds up a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Facebook friend Ivan Nikolov holds up a copy of The Clapper Memo.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter

Something’s Seriously Wrong When Military Justice System Sides With Psychics, Convicted Felons and Porn Queens

I’ve written many articles about cases involving military men falsely accused and, in many cases, wrongly convicted, of sexual assault. Today, however, I’m going to point you, my readers, to three cases that began with sexual assault allegations made against military men by three unique women: a psychic, a porn queen and a convicted felon.

Former Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart in Iraq.

Former Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart in Iraq. To read his story, order a copy of Three Days In August by clicking on the image above.

The first case involves similar allegations made against Air Force MSgt. Michael Silva. According to one news account, Silva’s case was the oldest yet in a scandal at Lackland AFB in San Antonio that saw 35 Basic Military Training instructors investigated for misconduct with 68 recruits and technical training students over a four-year period. His accuser is a woman who described herself as a “psychic medium” in a series of Twitter postings in October 2009. Interestingly, she made her allegations against Silva, a former BMT instructor at the base, a whopping 17 years after she had spent only three days as an Air Force trainee in his squadron. It was her claim about being a psychic that prompted me to ask the tongue-in-cheek question about this so-called psychic: “Shouldn’t she have known in advance if she was about to become the victim of a horrible crime?

You can read more about his case in a piece that appears under the headline, Social Media Postings Reveal Much About ‘Psychic Medium’ Who Accused AF Basic Training Instructor of Sexual Assault. To read other pieces about Silva’s case, which is under appeal at this time, click here.

Silva-Martin Coverage

The second case involves sexual assault allegations made against Army Maj. Christian “Kit” Martin by the woman to whom he thought he had been legally married. Only weeks before his military trial was set to begin at Fort Campbell, Ky., he learned the woman had entered a guilty plea before a Christian County (Ky.) judge on a felony charge of bigamy. In other words, she had admitted to having married Major Martin without telling him she was still married to another man. Despite the fact that Major Martin’s accuser and former “spouse” is a convicted felon and, due to the nature of the crime, a person who has lived many years under a cloud of falsehoods, the Army seems bent on following through with this career Army officer’s military trial at which he faces the possibility of a very long prison sentence if found guilty.

For a fairly-comprehensive look at this case through the end of September, read Thirty Days of Hell in the Life of an Accused Army Officer. To read other pieces about the case, click here.

The third case involves sexual assault allegations made against another military man — who I’m not yet ready to identify — by a woman who is now his ex-wife. Interestingly, his accuser turned into an entrepreneur of sorts soon after her husband was convicted and sentenced to prison. Her business? Adult entertainment. Though it’s difficult to understand the exact nature of what appears to be her multi-faceted business, I believe “wannabe porn queen” describes her well. Why? Because this moderately-attractive woman has, on her websites and social media pages, posted a plethora of photographs in which she is shown posing naked and semi-naked. One photo even shows her face situated only inches away from a man’s genitalia.

Though I’m waiting to collect a few more items before I break this story in full, I can point you to a letter written by a woman who is well-informed about the case. It appears under the headline, Wife Offers Details About Wrongly-Accused Husband’s Case.

The military justice cases highlighted above have caused me much concern, and they should be of immediate concern to all Americans who care about those who serve in uniform. Political correctness is killing our people and our readiness. Needless to say, I’ll continue to follow them and keep you apprised of new developments as they occur.

To read about my most-comprehensive investigation to date of a case of false sexual assault allegations, order a copy of Three Days In August. In this, my first nonfiction book, I chronicle the life story and wrongful conviction of a highly-decorated Army Special Forces Soldier and combat veteran who, as a Green Beret medic and Level 1 sniper, received one Bronze Star Medal, though he really earned two.

Show your support and help keep these articles coming by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same. To learn how to order signed copies, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

GREEN BERET: ‘The next thing you know, it felt like someone put lighter fluid on me and caught me on fire’

Having already survived several combat deployments in Iraq, Army Special Forces Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart never expected to come face to face with death during a tour of “schoolhouse duty” at a NATO training center in Germany, but he did. Some of the details of the Green Beret’s brush with death appear in the excerpt below from my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August:

Kelly Stewart returns from a mission in Iraq.

Kelly Stewart returns from a mission in Iraq.

Panicking because they had eaten up some time, they began hooking up bottles and IVs and then another bad thing happened: Stewart had an allergic reaction to a drug the German doctors used and went into anaphylactic shock.

“(There’s) nothing like being double-handcuffed and (having) your feet shackled and strapped to a bed (while) going into anaphylaxis,” Stewart said. “I’ve seen a lot of people go through it, but being conscious and going through it is very difficult.

“It just started off as being real tight in the chest,” he continued. “The next thing you know, it felt like somebody put lighter fluid on me and caught me on fire.

“I couldn’t breathe at all, and everybody was kind of panicking around me, trying to give me medication to stop what was happening.”

Soon, the Germans said they didn’t have a doctor who could treat him, that he was probably having liver and kidney failure and was probably going to die. Their message to the American cops: “We need to get him out of here.”

“Of course, I’m understanding what the Germans are saying and what they’re telling the cops,” Stewart said. “They’re kind of underhanded, saying, ‘We can’t treat him here. We need to send him over to Landstuhl,’” the U.S. Army’s largest hospital in Europe.

“What they’re saying in German is, ‘We need to get him out of here, because he’s not going to survive,’ and they didn’t want that (outcome) in their hospital.”

To learn details about the events leading up to and following Stewart’s hospital stay, order a copy of Three Days In August today!

Show your support and help keep these articles coming by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same. To learn how to order signed copies, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.