TALK RADIO ALERT: Listen To ‘Coast to Coast AM’ at Midnight

George Noory

George Noory

TALK RADIO ALERT: Tune in to Coast to Coast AM with host George Noory beginning at Midnight Central tonight! I’ll be on the show for two hours to discuss THE CLAPPER MEMO, my second nonfiction book in which I share the findings of my exhaustive four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of so-called “credibility assessment” technologies, including the polygraph.

The list of topics we’ll discuss includes, but will not be limited to, the Edward Snowden/NSA spying scandal, the “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attacks in Afghanistan and the interrogation of detainees at Guantanamo Bay. In addition, we’ll discuss how these topics connect to the “turf war” that’s raged silently for more than 40 years between polygraph loyalists and all challengers to their century-old technology.

Coast to Coast AM airs on more than 560 stations in the U.S., as well as Canada, Mexico and Guam, and is heard by nearly three million weekly listeners. To find a station near you, click here.

UPDATE 3/14/14 at 9:36 a.m. Central:  Seven and a half hours ago, I wrapped up my two-hour guest appearance on Coast to Coast AM.  Funniest moment:  A caller told host George Noory and me that his employer years earlier had required him to take frequent polygraphs. When I asked the man what kind of work he did, he said he was a projectionist at an X-rated theater.  Huh?  Also had a caller accuse me of making up stuff about knowing Army Rangers, Green Berets, Navy SEALs, etc. I told him that, unlike Joe Biden, I was not going to divulge the names of any of the “Quiet Professionals” to whom I made a promise of anonymity.  To download a podcast (subscription required) of the show, click here.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Author Not Surprised to Hear Retired General Say Muslim Brotherhood Inside Pentagon

When I heard retired Army Lt. Gen. Jerry Boykin telling an interviewer in the video below that he knows our government — including the Pentagon! — has been infiltrated at the highest levels by members of the radical Muslim Brotherhood, I wasn’t the least bit surprised. Why? I’ll explain after you watch the video below.

I wasn’t surprised, because I spent four years conducting an exhaustive investigation of the credibility assessment tools relied upon by federal government agencies and members of the contractor community as they screen individuals for employment, conduct background investigations and interrogate individuals suspected of criminal, terrorist and/or treasonous activities.

Along the way, I uncovered three separate memos — one of which was issued by then-Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., who now serves as Director of National Intelligence — via which senior Department of Defense officials informed all DoD personnel that the century-old polygraph was the only credibility assessment technology authorized for their use.

I also revealed the existence of a “turf war” that’s been raging silently for more than 40 years between polygraph loyalists unwilling to embrace a newer, more-reliable technology that’s already been embraced by more than 1,900 local and state law enforcement agencies nationwide.

General Boykin’s claims begin to make sense when one takes into consideration how well the polygraph has performed in several key areas:

• Despite what International Security Assistance Force officials once posted and later removed from the ISAF Facebook page, the portable polygraph deployed to Afghanistan certainly hasn’t improved the vetting process used to screen Afghan recruits or prevented record numbers of “Green-on-Blue” Attacks during the past five years.

• Periodic polygraph exams should have helped prevent the unauthorized disclosure of millions of classified and/or sensitive documents by people like Edward Snowden. Instead, he was able to pass the very polygraph exams that were supposed to have caught him.

• During the early days of the so-called “Global War on Terror,” officials at Guantanamo Bay found themselves unable to count on support from polygraph loyalists when it came time to interrogate detainees. And when they turned to a non-polygraph technology and began to realize extraordinary results, DoD officials removed the non-polygraph tool from their arsenal!

The general’s claim also makes sense when one considers that a Freedom of Information Act request, via which I seek to obtain copies of unclassified documents related to DoD contracts for purchases of polygraph equipment, is about to turn 20 months old.

Click image above to order.

Click image above to order.

It’s worth noting that I’m not the only one who believes what I share on this topic in my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely, a retired U.S. Army general who once served as deputy commander of U.S. Army Pacific, endorsed the book, wrote, “Bob McCarty has uncovered a high-tech ‘turf war’ pitting those who want the best for our troops against others who seem to be focused on their own self-interests. Sadly, it seems the wrong people are winning this war. I highly recommend THE CLAPPER MEMO.”

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, a retired U.S. Navy officer who once served as commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs training program, characterized what I expose in the book as “clearly an unconscionable cover-up of a capability of the U.S. military and intelligence community to vet incoming Afghan (or any other) military personnel.”

David P. Schippers, the man who served as Congressman Henry Hyde‘s chief investigative counsel during the Clinton Impeachment Hearings in the U.S. House of Representatives, described the book as “perhaps the most thorough investigative reporting I have encountered in years. I direct the attention of the so-called major media to it. This is how it’s done!”

Gold Star family members have praised the book, too.

MaryLiz Grossetto, the aunt of LCpl. Greg Buckley Jr., a 21-year-old Marine who died in Afghanistan in August 2012 as the result of a “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attack, read the book. Afterward, she offered this review: “Read this book & you will see how our government has for many, many years deprived our military of the best possible tool for vetting & weeding out the enemy.”

Billy and Karen Vaughn shared their observations about the book almost two years after their son, U.S. Navy SEAL Aaron Carson Vaughn, lost his life along with 29 other Americans when their helicopter, call sign “Extortion 17,” was shot down in Afghanistan Aug. 6, 2011. In their endorsement, they wrote, “THE CLAPPER MEMO by Bob McCarty gives the reader an in-depth look into the dirty little secrets of politics and greed triumphing over safety and security for our fighting men and women as well as the average American citizen.”

I hope you’ll take the opportunity to read the book, too!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

War Against Men in the Military: Cases Bear Shocking Similarities

While reading a WRAL.com article today, I couldn’t help but notice shocking similarities between the sexual assault prosecutions of Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair and Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart, the man whose wrongful conviction is chronicled in my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August.

Click image above to read other articles in my series, "War on Men in the Military."

Click image above to read other articles in my series, “War on Men in the Military.”

One example can be found in the three paragraphs that follow an explanation of how the military judge in the case decided to prosecute despite a recommendation from the lead prosecutor that General Sinclair’s plea to a charge of adultery be accepted. The example begins in paragraph four as follows:

The defense contends that the captain, who served with Sinclair in Iraq and Afghanistan, committed perjury in a January hearing about finding text messages form Sinclair on an old cellphone, making her a poor witness on which to build a case against the general.

The captain said in the January hearing that she came across the old phone in December and charged it up to see if there was anything on it that would affect Sinclair’s court-martial. A defense forensics expert contradicted her testimony, saying she had turned the phone on several times in the months before she said she found it packed in a box.

The defense argues in the motion that the Army continues to press the case only to support a get-tough policy against sex assault in the military.

Click image above to read reviews of Three Days In August.

Click image above to read reviews of Three Days In August.

Notice the word, perjury, and how a forensics expert proved it? Apparently, perjury by a female in a military sexual assault case isn’t cause for concern.

In the case of Stewart, a highly-decorated Green Beret combat veteran, several instances of perjury surfaced during and after his court-martial.

Two that surfaced during the trial involved a German police detective and a taxi driver whose memory issues are highlighted in the article, German Police Detective Has Memory Issues Like Accuser.

One arose during the pre-sentencing phase and involved the accuser offering a strange definition of “contact.”

Yet another was brought to the court’s attention by a long-time friend of the accuser who made a post-trial statement that should have netted Stewart a new trial.

I, for one, can’t wait to read the trial transcript if or when General Sinclair’s case reaches the trial phase. Why? Because I suspect it will be as chock full of half-truths, lies and innuendo as Stewart’s trial was as the War on Men in the Military continues.

UPDATE 3/16/2014 at 8:13 p.m. Central: Sexual assault charges dropped against general after case tainted by political influence.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Week Filled With Praise, Threats, Blunders and Prize Money

Those of you who follow me on Facebook know I’m on the homestretch of my first fiction novel with more than 300 pages completed and, I estimate, 100 pages to go.  When I wasn’t busy working on the novel, however, I found time to share four new pieces related to my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Click on image above to connect to article.

Click on image above to connect to article.

Under the Sunday headline, Townhall Columnist Praises My Latest Book, The Clapper Memo, I shared news about Townhall.com columnist Mark Baisley‘s review of the book, When Technology War Kills Our Own Soldiers.

In the last four words of the Monday headline, DoD Spokesman Labels “Insider Threat” to Troops in Afghanistan “As Dangerous As It Ever Was,” I highlighted the words of Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby after he was quoted in Stars and Stripes as saying the “insider threat” against American forces in Afghanistan is “as dangerous as it ever was.”  After he failed to mention them, I offered details about “insider attacks” in Afghanistan that I uncovered during the four-year investigation upon which THE CLAPPER MEMO is based.  Consider it a public service.

Click on image above to connect to article.

Click on image above to connect to article.

On Thursday, I was excited to see Washington Times reporter Rowan Scarborough had written an article about U.S. troops being left to fend for themselves in Afghanistan.  In particular, he shared details about the same type of poor Pentagon decision-making I exposed in THE CLAPPER MEMO.  Read about it under the headline, Defense Department Contracting Blunders Highlighted by Writers.  [Warning:  It might set your nose hairs on fire.]

Also on Thursday, I shared something from the STRANGE-BUT-TRUE files under the headline, Intel Chief Launches Contest to Find Already-Existing Technology.  Of course, it involves Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. and the decision by his folks at the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity to hold a contest that awards prize money to people who develop something that already exists.  That “something,” by the way, is at the heart of what I write about in THE CLAPPER MEMO.

I hope you’ll take a look at the stories above and, after you do, share your favorite articles with your friends and ORDER A COPY of THE CLAPPER MEMOThanks in advance!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

DoD Spokesman Labels ‘Insider Threat’ to Troops in Afghanistan ‘As Dangerous As It Ever Was’

Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby was quoted in Stars and Stripes Friday as saying the “insider threat” against American forces in Afghanistan is “as dangerous as it ever was.” And he’s right. What he did not mention, however, is the fact that many “insider attacks” are preventable.

Click image above to read more posts about "Green-on-Blue" or "Insider" attacks.

Click image above to read more posts about “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attacks.

Admiral Kirby’s comments likely stem from the fact that he’s been kept in the dark about decisions made by senior Department of Defense officials during the past decade that have resulted in the best screening and interrogation tools available being kept out of the hands of U.S. military and intelligence officials. Out of the hands of interrogation officials in places like Afghanistan and Iraq. And, most recently, out of the vetting process used to screen recruits hoping to serve in Afghanistan’s military, police and security agencies.

Click image above to order.

Click image above to order.

In my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, I share never-before-published details about decisions made by DoD officials at the highest levels — including Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. when he was serving as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence — and about decisions that should be made in the future.

Unfortunately for good men like Spc. John A. Pelham, 22, of Portland, Ore., and Sgt. First Class Roberto C. Skelt, 41, of York, Fla., any decisions to change policy will come too late. The Army Special Forces Soldiers were killed Wednesday when, according to the aforementioned Stripes report, two individuals wearing Afghan National Army uniforms opened fire on them with machine guns. They became casualties of yet another “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider Attack.”

Click image above to read endorsements of THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Click image above to read endorsements of THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, U.S. Navy retired, came to understand the gravity of this situation after reading THE CLAPPER MEMO. In fact, the former commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs training program described what I reveal in the book as “an unconscionable cover-up.” Others have offered similar assessments.

See if you agree. Order your copy today!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Afghan Government to Release Prisoners U.S. Calls ‘Dangerous’

Today, a possibility I reported 18 days ago became a reality when, according to this report, Afghan government officials ordered the release of more than three-dozen prisoners the U.S. Government considers “dangerous.”

This Feb. 6, 2012, photo shows two released detainees waiting in the Wardak provincial governor's compound at Forward Operating Base Airborne, Afghanistan. Before their release, the men promised to live peacefully and signed pledges to renounce violence. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amanda Dick/Released)

This Feb. 6, 2012, photo shows two released detainees waiting in the Wardak provincial governor’s compound at Forward Operating Base Airborne, Afghanistan. Before their release, the men promised to live peacefully and signed pledges to renounce violence. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Amanda Dick)

Who are the prisoners being released from the Afghan-operated Bagram prison? Seventeen of the 37 to be released have reportedly been linked to the production of improvised explosive devices that killed 11 U.S. and NATO troops. Though the source of today’s news does not mention whether or not these soon-to-be-released Afghans were involved in any “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attacks, I think it’s safe to assume they would condone and, in the future, be involved in such attacks if given the opportunities.

Sadly, this poor decision made by Afghan officials serving on the Afghan Review Board is not much different than many of the decisions made at the highest levels of the U.S. Government which have had — and continue to have — negative impacts on our men and women in uniform.

To learn intimate details related to some of those decisions, order a copy of my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO. Available in paperback and ebook versions, the book received the endorsement of a retired Navy SEALs training program commander who describes what I reveal inside the book as “an unconscionable cover-up.” Other high-profile individuals endorsed it as well.

UPDATE 2/13/2014 at 9:23 a.m. Central: They been released!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Ours Isn’t Only Government Inclined to Release Bad Guys

Barely four months ago, I shared news from Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. about detainees at Guantanamo Bay and what they did after being released.  Today, I can report that ours isn’t the only government inclined to release bad guys from prison too soon.

100707-F-3431H-016According to a Military.com report Wednesday, U.S. military officials said Tuesday that seven prisoners believed responsible for “Green-on-Blue” or “insider” attacks that killed U.S. and NATO troops may soon be released by Afghan government officials.

What was it that DNI Clapper reported four months ago?  Allow me to refresh your memory by sharing an excerpt from my piece published Sept. 6, 2013:

Good news from Guantanamo Bay! Well, sort of. The rate at which detainees return to terrorism (a.k.a., “reengage”) after being released “back into the wild” has not increased, according to the latest report from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Instead, the rate has remained at 28 percent — the same as it was the last time I reported it. In other words, only 174 of 603 detainees who’ve been released from the U.S. Navy’s detention facility in Cuba have returned to their wicked ways!!!

ODNI GITMO Reengage 2013 LR

But there is some good news: Nineteen of the 174 have died since returning to terrorism and 52 are back in custody.

And there is more bad news: One-hundred and three are not in custody, probably on their way to Syria to engage in some U.S. taxpayer-supported regime change.

In my recently-released book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, I share details contained in letters and other documents I obtained during the past four years from individuals who served as high-ranking interrogation officials at GITMO. Most importantly, I share how they describe the damage done to national security by a Pentagon decision to strip GITMO interrogators of their most-effective tool for learning about detainees’ past exploits and future plans. And, of course, Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. plays a key role in this story one retired Navy SEAL called “an unconscionable cover-up.”

I wonder what the loved ones of Americans killed or wounded in “Green-on-Blue” attacks think about the prospect of these Afghans being released.

To learn more about the war in Afghanistan and how decisions made at the highest levels of government have had — and continue to have — a negative impact on our men and women in uniform, order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO.  Available in paperback and ebook versions, it’s received a number of high-profile endorsements since its release in May.

UPDATE 1/09/2013 at 1:01 p.m. Central:  I hope Afghan government officials don’t change their minds and release the Afghan killer mentioned in this article.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.