War on Men in the Military Spawns New Book, New Victim

The War on Men in the Military spawned a new book and a new victim in recent days, thanks largely to Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) and her efforts to demonize people involved in the case of alleged sexual assault involving Air Force fighter pilot Lt. Col. James H. Wilkerson III.

NEW BOOK

The Whole Truth by Bob Harvey

Click image above to order.

Retired Air Force Col. Bob Harvey released his first book, The Whole Truth: The Tainted Prosecution of an American Fighter Pilot.

In 336 pages, Colonel Harvey reveals the lengths the military will go to appease politicians and aggressively prosecute sexual assault cases, even when the evidence doesn’t support a conviction or even going to trial.

More specifically, the former F-16 pilot and combat veteran focuses on details of the case in which Colonel Wilkerson was wrongly convicted and sentenced to one year in prison before his court-martial conviction was overturned by Air Force Lt. Gen. Craig A. Franklin, then commander of Third Air Force, who was performing his role as convening authority in the case.  He also spotlights two key issues — no physical evidence and conflicting testimony — and points out how the Air Force ignored facts and used questionable tactics in a relentless pursuit of a conviction in the high-profile case.

Lt. Col. James Wilkerson

Lt. Col. James Wilkerson, USAF

The Whole Truth strikes me as similar to my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August, in which I chronicled the wrongful sexual-assault conviction of Army Special Forces Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Stewart, a highly-decorated Green Beret combat veteran.  Colonel Harvey puts the case against Colonel Wilkerson on trial and uses court-martial records to examine the story point by point and point out the wrongs against an officer who, despite having his conviction overturned, was forced into early retirement at the reduced rank of major.

I highly recommend you order a copy of The Whole Truth, read it, and tell your friends to do the same.

GENERAL RESIGNS, SENATOR CROWS

In announcing his retirement earlier this week, according to a report in Stars and Stripes, General Franklin was diplomatic and cited his belief that the public questioning of his judgment as a general court-martial convening authority had become “a distraction for the Air Force.”

Lt. Gen. Craig A. Franklin, USAF

Lt. Gen. Craig A. Franklin, USAF

Conversely, Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) was anything but diplomatic in a news release I received via email yesterday about the general she had lambasted for months:

“Lt. Gen. Franklin’s decision to resign is the right one.  His handling of sexual assault cases is the best possible illustration of why civilian review, elimination of commanders’ ability to overturn convictions, and so many other protections are included in our recent defense bill.”

To learn more about how the military command structure is being weakened via the overhaul of the military justice system by people like Senator McCaskill, follow my series, War on Men in the Military.  The first post in that series, published March 7, 2013, can be found here.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Have You Ever Wondered Why DoD Relies on the Polygraph?

You’ve probably never wondered why the Department of Defense relies so heavily on the polygraph.  Likewise, you’ve probably never thought about how polygraph technology has maintained its place as the only DoD-approved credibility assessment technology.  After reading the details in my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, you’ll know why and how.

TCM Graphic 2-17-13On no fewer than three occasions since 2004, top DoD officials — including Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper while he was serving as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence in 2007 — have declared the polygraph to be the only such technology approved for use by DoD personnel.  Though many on the front lines, including elite U.S. Special Operations personnel I interviewed for the book, ignored the DoD declarations for as long as they possibly could (see Sample Chapter for details), the Pentagon’s polygraph-only stance remains in place today and is having an often-deadly impact in the form of “Green-on-Blue” attacks against American and Coalition Forces personnel in Afghanistan.

BMW Withheld Info PicAs I explained yesterday, part of the blame for DoD’s polygraph-only stance lies in the fact that DoD officials withheld critical information from members of the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee when they were conducting an inquiry into the treatment of detainees at Guantanamo Bay and at other detention facilities in Iraq (i.e., Abu Ghraib, Camp Cropper and Camp Bucca) in 2008.

That wasn’t all they kept to themselves.  DoD officials also withheld critical information about an Air Force talking paper on Relevant/Irrelevant Screening Tests (R/IST) conducted on detainees in the Iraqi theater of operations from Aug. 1, 2004, to Oct. 15, 2006.

Notable among the 50-page document’s results, found after conducting polygraph tests on 768 detainees, was the finding that “detainee personnel are just as likely to have committed the suspected act as not.” That finding stemmed from the fact that 47 percent of the tests yielded “No Deception Indicated” results while 46 percent yielded “Deception Indicated” and seven percent “No Opinion.”

Silver_CoinIn addition to the fact the tests yielded results showing polygraph no more effective than flipping a coin, a quarter of the polygraph examiners surveyed pointed out problems posed by language barriers.

“The Arabic language itself presents an obstacle due to the different translations and dialect and at times the wrong translation of the question was noted by other interpreters,” one examiner said.

“Many interpreters were not fluent in the written Arabic language, precluding them being used by polygraph,” another reported. “They could not translate questions from English to Arabic and back again.”

“I was fortunate to have had motivated interpreters,” a third responded.  “Without them we can’t do the job (without language/culture knowledge).”

A fourth examiner reported, “there was definitely a difference in the level of interpreter experience. Some knew the language and some had a hard time.”

TheClapperMemoFrontCoverLR 6-5-13In THE CLAPPER MEMO, a 268-page product of an exhaustive four-year investigation, I highlight the fact that a non-polygraph technology was used at GITMO more than 90 times and achieved a success rate — defined as developing new, previously-unknown intelligence which was independently confirmed or confirmed existing information that otherwise could not be verified — of 92 percent despite the fact most exams were conducted using interpreters.

Now, I ask again:  Have you ever wondered how polygraph technology has maintained its position as the only Department of Defense-approved credibility assessment technology?

In their endorsement of THE CLAPPER MEMO, Gold Star parents Billy and Karen Vaughn used words such as “dirty little secrets of politics and greed” and “filthy backroom deals” to describe events and actions that have enabled the polygraph to remain DoD’s credibility assessment technology of choice.  The Vaughns lost their son, U.S. Navy SEAL Aaron Carson Vaughn, two years and one day ago in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan that is the subject of a soon-to-be-published book, BETRAYED: The High Cost of the War on Terror.

Retired U.S. Navy SEAL Capt. Larry W. Bailey, co-founder of Special Operations Speaks and former commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs Basic Underwater Demoliton/SEALs (“BUD/S”) Training Program, describes what I uncovered in THE CLAPPER MEMO as “an unconscionable cover-up.”

Others have endorsed it, too, but you should judge for yourself!  Order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO.  It’s available in paperback and ebook versions.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Senator McCaskill Ignores ‘Innocent Until Proven Guilty’

“You have got a wealth of people in the Air Force who understand what this job has to be, and if the allegations in this case are true this was not someone who understood what his job was about,” said Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) in a news release I received from her office via email today. “I will be watching very closely who is selected to replace him, because I think this will be one of those times you can send a message.”

Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.)

Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.)

The senator was, of course, referring to the job held by Lt. Col. Jeff Krusinski, the officer in charge of the U.S. Air Force’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office, until he was arrested during the wee morning hours of May 5, according to a police report published the next day (shown below):

SEXUAL BATTERY, 05/05/13, 500 block of S. 23rd Street. On May 5 at 12:35 am, a drunken male subject approached a female victim in a parking lot and grabbed her breasts and buttocks. The victim fought the suspect off as he attempted to touch her again and alerted police. Jeffrey Krusinski, 41, of Arlington, VA, was arrested and charged with sexual battery. He was held on a $5,000 unsecured bond.

If Colonel Krusinski is guilty, he should suffer the appropriate punishment. Until that is determined, however, people like Senator McCaskill — who knows better as a former prosecutor in Jackson County, Mo.– should shut their mouths and remember the presumption that a person is “innocent until proven guilty.”

Unfortunately, Senator McCaskill has a track record of struggling to keep her mouth shut, especially while serving as a mouthpiece in DoD’s War on Men.

As I reported in my April 11 piece, Senator McCaskill Continues Reckless Effort to Undermine Military Justice System, the senator publicly smeared Air Force Lt. Col. James H. Wilkerson III after his sexual assault conviction was overturned by Air Force Lt. Gen. Craig A. Franklin.

“Rape is the crime of a coward—and rapists in the ranks are masquerading as real members of our military,” Senator McCaskill explained in a March 13 news release, adding, “The focus of our efforts should be on effective prosecution. There’s no reason a General who’s never heard the testimony of factual witnesses should be able to wipe out a verdict with the stroke of a pen.”

Even more unfortunately, she’s been joined in her latest effort by news organizations — see here, here and here as examples — who’ve gone the extra mile to convey a mugshot image of the 41-year-old officer as “already guilty” while making no mentions of important facts about the man.

Neither the senator nor the media outlets mention that, according to this commentary, Colonel Krusinski deployed to Iraq in 2009 to serve as Deputy Expeditionary Mission Support Group Commander at Joint Base Balad.

Likewise, neither mentioned the colonel had been named Air Mobility Command’s Force Support Field Grade Officer of the Year and described as one of AMC’s “superstars” while stationed at MacDill AFB, Fla.

And who cares that he served honorably for more than 21 years! He might <emphasis added> have committed a misdemeanor sexual assault and, at a minimum, deserves to be treated as innocent until proven guilty.

All that aside, I cannot imagine anyone wanting to replace Colonel Krusinski as chief of SAPRO and a co-conspirator with Senator McCaskill in destroying the military from within.

This is ugly folks.

UPDATE: A few minutes before publishing this piece, I heard a radio report featuring President Barack Obama stating, “I have directly spoken directly to Secretary Hagel already today, indicating to him that we’re going to have to not just step up our game – we have to exponentially step up our game to go at this thing hard.” Reuters confirms the quote.

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Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

USAF General Puts Sexual Assault Case Documents Online

Air Force Lt. Gen. Craig A. Franklin appears as if he’s not going to go down without a fight when it comes to allegations by Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) and others that he was wrong to dismiss a sexual assault conviction against Lt. Col. James H. Wilkerson III.

General Franklin LR

Lt. Gen. Craig A. Franklin, USAF

Today, the Third Air Force commander who served as convening authority in the case against Colonel Wilkerson made a plethora of case-related documents available to visitors on the Air Force Freedom of Information Act website.

Collectively referred to as the Record of Trial, the list of documents includes all pre-trial, trial and post-trial documents as well as a link to the six-page letter (pdf) General Franklin voluntarily wrote to Secretary of the Air Force Michael B. Donley — which I referenced in an article published Thursday — appears on the site.

Is this an unprecedented move by a convening authority? I don’t know for sure. It is, however, a bold move by a general officer who seems to be focused on doing what’s right instead of doing whether it takes to earn a fourth star. For that, I salute you, General Franklin.

Read more about this case and others I’ve highlighted in my series, DoD’s War on Men.

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Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Senator Claire McCaskill Owes Air Force Officer An Apology

Six days ago, I asked a question, Is DoD Waging War on Warriors?, and proceeded to highlight the cases of five members of the U.S. Armed Forces who have faced, or will soon face, prosecution on a variety of charges, with most falling under the “sexual assault” umbrella.  The following day, I highlighted U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill’s (D-Mo.) desire to see an Air Force general fired for doing the right thing.  Today, I offer another sad update on “Claire Bear” and her inexcusable actions, including the fact that she owes an Air Force officer an apology.

Sen. Claire McCaskill

Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.)

On Tuesday, Senator McCaskill announced she is proposing legislation to curtail the authority of military commanders to override court-martial convictions involving sexual assault charges and publicized the fact that she had met with Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh “to discuss her ongoing efforts to address sexual assaults in the military.”

Just after 2 p.m. Central, I received a news release from the liberal Democrat in which she virtually screamed out, “Rape is the crime of a coward—and rapists in the ranks are masquerading as real members of our military” before adding, “The focus of our efforts should be on effective prosecution. There’s no reason a General who’s never heard the testimony of factual witnesses should be able to wipe out a verdict with the stroke of a pen.”

Lt. Col. James H. Wilkerson III

I’m not a lawyer, but it appears Senator McCaskill owes an apology to Air Force Lt. Col. James H. Wilkerson III, the man whose guilty verdict on a sexual assault charge was overturned by Lt. Gen. Craig Franklin, commander of Third Air Force and the convening authority over the case.  And she could still face defamation charges afterward!

Upon what do I base my assertion?  For starters, the fact that Colonel Wilkerson was never accused of rape by anyone during his prosecution on sexual assault charge at Aviano Air Base, Italy, where he was serving as the 31st Fighter Wing‘s inspector general in November 2012 when he was accused of aggravated sexual assault.

Heck, not even Kim Hanks, the 49-year-old physician’s assistant who took her case public for the first time this morning during a segment broadcast on NBC’s TODAY Show, accused him of rape.  So where does Senator McCaskill get off making such slanderous accusation?  No doubt, Colonel Wilkerson’s attorneys will ask that question.

Final thought:  For anyone, especially residents of the Show-Me State, to claim they’re surprised by  Senator McCaskill‘s antics would be disingenuous.  Everyone knows she is simply grandstanding and pandering to the far-left in her party.  Stay tuned for more as I understand Colonel Wilkerson has hired a very good attorney for Round Two.

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Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Senator McCaskill Wants General Fired for Doing Right Thing

Earlier today, I shared news about what appears to be a war being waged against men who wear the uniforms of the Armed Forces of the United States.  In this post, I reveal more details about Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), one of three liberal United States senators on the wrong side of the battlefield.

WC Soldiers 3-7-13

Click image to read the stories of the men shown above.

Below is the full text of the scathing letter Senator McCaskill sent March 5 to Secretary of the Air Force Michael B. Donley and Gen. Mark A. Welsh III, Chief of Staff of the Air Force after Lt. Gen. Craig Franklin, commander of Third Air Force and the convening authority for the case of alleged sexual assault involving Lt. Col. James H. Wilkerson III:

Dear Secretary Donley and General Welsh:

Claire McCaskillAs a former prosecutor who tried many challenging rape and sexual assault cases, I was appalled to learn of Lt. Gen. Craig Franklin’s decision to dismiss the charges in the Air Force case United States vs. Wilkerson, charges that had resulted in a conviction.  As you are no doubt aware, the defendant in the case had been convicted and sentenced by a duly-appointed military jury, and had begun to serve his sentence.  It has now been reported that Lt. Gen. Franklin, as the Convening Authority in the court martial, subsequently decided to dismiss the charges against the defendant, doing so, according to reports, contrary to the advice of his legal team.  As a result of Lt. Gen. Franklin’s action, the defendant was reinstated to the Air Force and made eligible for promotion.  This stunning decision demonstrates a total disregard for the survivors of sexual assault and for the findings of the military justice system at a time when holding sexual predators accountable is critical to our military.

As the Air Force and other military organizations are redoubling efforts to erase a culture that has often turned a blind eye on sexual assault, Lt. Gen. Franklin’s conduct undermines this important shift.  His decision shows ignorance, at best, and malfeasance, at worst.  I strongly urge you to undertake an immediate review of his conduct and consider removing him from his leadership position.

As the commander of the 3rd Air Force, Lt. Gen. Franklin has the responsibility to set an example for the men and women under his command.  His actions contribute to a command culture.  In this instance, Lt. Gen. Franklin’s actions send the unacceptable message that the United States Air Force specifically, and the U.S. Armed Forces as a whole, do not take seriously holding accountable perpetrators of sexual assault.

I have held the hands of survivors of sexual assault.  I have comforted them about their fears in testifying against those who attacked them.  I know how difficult it is for a survivor to come forward under the best of circumstances.  When they see a dismissal like that carried out by Lt. Gen. Franklin in this case, the message to a survivor of sexual assault is clear: do not bother coming forward.  I know you join me in finding this message unacceptable.  Survivors must be encouraged to report the assaults against them, justice must be pursued and survivors must receive the care they need.

The Uniform Code of Military Justice empowers commanders like Lt. Gen. Franklin with extensive authorities, but if they are not executed with sound judgment it becomes our responsibility, as Congress, to rein them in.  As the leaders of the Air Force, it is likewise up to you to take the appropriate actions to restore confidence to the airmen under your authority.  In light of this case, I will be reviewing whether formal legislative actions need to be taken to limit the authorities of military commanders to undo the work of military courts martial.

I expect to be fully informed of any actions you take, as well as any investigation and findings you make in this case.  I expect your review will be immediate and the actions you take will be swift.  I look forward to hearing from you in the near future.

Sincerely,

Claire McCaskill
United States Senator

Senator McCaskill is apparently ignorant of what’s really going on in the military justice system and has not kept up with my coverage of this issue, so I’ll revisit some of the important areas:

• My article published Sept. 13, revealed a prominent military defense attorney’s contention that 90 percent of military sexual assault cases would be thrown out of civilian courts due to lack of evidence;

• My article published April 17, exposed DoD’s crackdown on sexual assault as being more of a witch hunt than a law-based effort to combat a serious problem; and

• My book, Three Days In August, chronicles the life and wrongful conviction of Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart on sexual assault-related charges and shows in exacting detail how the military justice system, lacking any evidence upon which to base a conviction, can ruin a man’s life and career.

Apparently, ignorance is bliss in Senator McCaskill’s world.  And that’s bad news for everyone.

UPDATE 3/12/2013 at 7:39 p.m. Central: The insanity continues.

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Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Is DoD Waging War on Warriors?

Almost six months ago, news surfaced about Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair, then 50, facing possible court-martial on sexual misconduct and other charges, and I promised to keep my eye on that case and others like it. Today, I share details about the general’s case and several others brought to my attention by readers of my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August, which chronicles the life and wrongful conviction of Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart on sexual assault-related charges. Combined, these cases make me wonder if Department of Defense officials are waging a war on men in uniform (a.k.a., “warriors”), often under the banner of stopping sexual assaults.

GENERAL SINCLAIR

U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair, the deputy commanding general of support with the 82nd Airborne Division and Regional Command-South, speaks with Afghan media outside of a school near Forward Operating Base Howz-e-Madad in Kandahar, Afghanistan, Nov. 16, 2011. Sinclair was attending an open house, where Afghan students received backpacks full of school supplies. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Amanda Hils/Released)

U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair, the deputy commanding general of support with the 82nd Airborne Division and Regional Command-South, speaks with Afghan media outside of a school near Forward Operating Base Howz-e-Madad in Kandahar, Afghanistan, Nov. 16, 2011. Sinclair was attending an open house, where Afghan students received backpacks full of school supplies. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Amanda Hils/Released)

Though the case involving General Sinclair has yet to go to trial, one reader contacted me recently to ask if I had heard anything about the case. When I told him I had heard little beyond the fact that it was still in the pretrial stage, he suggested I visit the website, Sinclair Innocence. I took his advice and found information about the case that seems, for the most part, to be going unreported by mainstream news media outlets.

Under the tab, The Truth Behind the Case, several questions appear along with answers that tilt in favor of the accused general. Two paragraphs from the bottom of the page, links to journal entries and text messages — described as having been sent by the accuser to General Sinclair — seem to reveal much about the consensual nature of their relationship. If genuine, the documents seem to shed much light on the accuser’s mental state.

Under the tab, Who is the Army Prosecutor?, information appears about Lt. Col. Will Helixon, the Army’s lead prosecutor in the case. Not surprisingly, the information paints the prosecutor in a less than favorable light and includes, among other things, a link to a partial transcript of General Sinclair’s Article 32 Hearing in which the prosecution admits to illegal and unethical conduct. I recommend you check it out.

COLONEL WILKERSON

Lt Col Wilkerson2012

Then-Lt. Col. James Wilkerson. USAF photo.

New on my radar screen is the case involving Lt. Col. James H. Wilkerson III, an Air Force fighter pilot and former 80th Fighter Squadron commander who, at 44, was charged and convicted in November 2012 of aggravated sexual assault.

On Feb. 26, his conviction was overturned by Lt. Gen. Craig Franklin, commander of Third Air Force and the convening authority for his case. In turn, the well-respected colonel-select who had been serving as the 31st Fighter Wing inspector general at Aviano Air Base, Italy, was released from the brig where he had been sent to serve a one-year sentence.

When news surfaced about Colonel Wilkerson’s conviction being overturned, three liberal U.S. senators — Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), and Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) — issued a joint news release March 4, calling for General Franklin’s head on a platter.

In addition, Senator McCaskill wrote a scathing letter addressed to Secretary of the Air Force Michael B. Donley and Gen. Mark A. Welsh III, Chief of Staff of the Air Force. Dated March 5, the letter includes the senator’s demand that they “take the appropriate actions to restore confidence to the airmen under your authority.” It ended with the senator promising to review “whether formal legislative actions need to be taken to limit the authorities of military commanders to undo the work of military courts martial.”

In their minds, apparently, a military man is always guilty in a sexual assault case and, facts be damned, a female accuser is always innocent. Who cares if the man’s wife says he’s innocent; the sexual assault agenda must move forward!

Thankfully, according to individuals close to the case, General Franklin received approximately 100 letters of support — none of which came from the aforementioned U.S. senators — written on behalf of Colonel Wilkerson. Though I’m not at liberty to share specific details of the letters at this point, I can say that they came from two types of people — those who knew the colonel and those who knew the accuser — who sided with the accused officer.

Stay tuned as I hope to share more details of the case in the near future.

OTHER CASES

Though everyone who contacts me to tell me a loved one (i.e., husband, brother, son, uncle or friend) is innocent, I’ve refrained from sharing specifics details of most cases until verdicts are handed down and/or until appeals processes have run their course. Below, however, are tidbits from some of the cases about which I have yet to report specifics:

Sgt. Todd Knight

Sgt. Todd Knight. Family photo.

• Sergeant Todd Knight — While stationed in Germany, Army Sergeant Todd Knight befriended a young German woman while out with friends the night of Jan. 27, 2012. At some point during the evening, he and three other Soldiers — one of whom he considered a friend — accompanied the woman and one of her friends to the home where the sister of one of the women — but not the accuser — lived.

What actually happened at the home, however, remains a matter of much debate as conflicting stories were given to German authorities. Two things, however, stand without dispute: Sergeant Knight was arrested by German authorities the next day, accused of rape, and those same German authorities eventually decided not to pursue the case.

U.S. military officials, on the other hand, decided to move forward with charges of their own despite the fact that the alleged victim testified during the Article 32 hearing that she couldn’t remember what had happened that night and despite the aforementioned conflicting statements.

On Dec. 18, 2012, Sergeant Knight was found guilty of sexual assault, sentenced to one year behind bars and busted to E-1, the lowest enlisted rank and a rank he would hold until the end of his sentence when he would be dishonorably discharged from the Army.

Three months after Sergeant Knight’s conviction, people continued to show interest in proving the 25-year-old Soldier’s innocence. One who showed interest was the German woman at whose home the alleged rape occurred.

In a “To Whom It May Concern” letter dated February 28, she wrote that she has known Sergeant Knight for more than two years, and then she drops a bombshell, explaining that the sergeant’s unemployed accuser “told me SGT Knight did not rape her, and that she only said that because she didn’t want her boyfriend at that time to find out she was cheating on him.”

PFC David Lawrence

PFC David W. Lawrence. Army photo.

• Private First Class David W. Lawrence — Army PFC David W. Lawrence is an American Soldier from Indiana who, according to a Denver Post report May 25, 2011, pleaded guilty to shooting and killing Mullah Muhebullah, an Afghan detainee, seven months earlier. Despite the guilty plea, there are several problems with the case.

For instance, PFC Lawrence had been prescribed Zoloft and Trazadone, two powerful anti-depressant medications that have been linked to depression and suicide. In addition, members of the Army’s Sanity Board reported to the court that the Soldier had both Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and schizophrenia and “was unable to appreciate the nature and quality or wrongfulness of his conduct at the time of the alleged criminal misconduct.” Looked at together, one’s left wondering what PFC Lawrence’s superiors were thinking when they put the 20-year-old Soldier in charge of the Afghan detainee.

More gut-wrenching details about the case can be found on the Facebook page, In Support of David Lawrence.

Private Taylor Crawford

Private Taylor Crawford. Family photo.

Private Taylor J. Crawford — Anyone who says Army Private Taylor Crawford didn’t exercise the kind of thinking required of an American Soldier would be correct. Then again, the 19-year-old security policeman wasn’t at war; instead, he was out on the town drinking with a group of people he thought were his “friends” in Germany. Bad things followed and, before long, he had been accused, tried, convicted and sentenced to five years behind bars for his alleged involvement in the beating of a German man on a city sidewalk and the theft of the man’s wallet.

There is, however, one problem with the sequence of events as spelled out by Army prosecutors: Private Crawford’s blood-alcohol level was, according to two doctors consulted by members of Crawford’s family after the trial, so high that he would not have been able to perform the actions necessary to inflict the grievous injuries suffered by the German man.

Army prosecutors apparently did not consider the Soldier’s blood-alcohol level. Instead, they pressured two of the other Soldiers involved to testify against Private Crawford and, in exchange for lenient sentencing, say he was the main culprit in the beating. Incredibly, one of the Soldiers said he couldn’t remember exactly what had happened but did recall a “vision” he had and was convinced it was based upon what happened the night of the incident.

More information about the case is available on the Facebook page, Free Taylor Crawford.

Of course, there are plenty of other cases, and more will surely follow if this “war on men in uniform” is allowed to fester within DoD. Stay tuned for updates!

CORRECTION:  In the original version of this story, I noted that Lt. Col. Wilkerson had pinned on the rank of colonel (i.e., O-6).  According to this report today, that was in error.

UPDATE 3/12/2013 at 7:40 p.m. Central: The insanity continues.

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Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.