Tag Archives: Afghanistan

Government Funds Program to Develop Voice Stress-Based Vetting Technology Despite Fact Technology Already Exists

Would it surprise you to learn the federal government has been spending millions of dollars to develop a voice stress-based credibility-assessment technology to vet foreign individuals seeking entry into the United States from places like Syria? Hardly. But it might surprise you to learn the money has been spent despite the fact that kind of technology already exists and has proven itself over and over again in places like Afghanistan, Iraq and Guantanamo Bay.

AVATAR – University of Arizona BORDERS Program

AVATAR – University of Arizona BORDERS Program

During an exhaustive four-year investigation of the federal government’s use of credibility-assessment technologies, including the polygraph, I found numerous individuals — most of whom worked with or for government agencies — eager to disparage the idea that one can detect deception by measuring stress in the human voice. Toward the end of my investigation, I learned about a government-funded effort at the University of Arizona to develop a voice stress-based technology despite the fact such a technology already exists and has proven itself to the point that more state and local law enforcement agencies use it than use the polygraph.

Slightly modified with the addition of links in place of footnotes for stand-alone publication, details of my brief electronic exchanges with a man involved in the aforementioned research at the U of A appear below as excerpted from my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo:

Click image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

If, as polygraph loyalists have claimed for decades, it is not possible to detect stress in the human voice, then why have so many taxpayer dollars been dedicated to pairing the study of the human voice with credibility-assessment technologies?

Seeking an answer to that question, I contacted Jay F. Nunamaker, Ph.D. and lead researcher at the National Center for Border Security and Immigration  (a.k.a., “BORDERS”) at the University of Arizona in Tucson.  In reply to my inquiry August 6, 2012, Dr. Nunamaker shared details about the project.

He began by explaining that the program has received funding from several sources, including — but not limited to — the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and no fewer than three branches of the U.S. military.

Next, he described the history of the project.

“We started down this path to develop a non-intrusive, non-invasive next-generation polygraph about 10 years ago with funding from the Polygraph Institute at Ft. Jackson,” he wrote.

Ten years?

If, per Dr. Nunamaker, the effort began 10 years ago at Polygraph Headquarters, that means it got its start at about the same time the 2003 National Research Council report, “The Polygraph and Lie Detection,” was published and offered, among other things, that the majority of 57 research studies touted by the American Polygraph Association were “unreliable, unscientific and biased.”

In a message August 31, 2012, Dr. Nunamaker offered more details about his research.

“The UA team has created an Automated Virtual Agent for Truth Assessment in Real-Time (AVATAR) that uses an embodied conversational agent–an animated human face backed by biometric sensors and intelligent agents–to conduct interviews,” he explained.  “It is currently being used at the Nogales, Mexico-U.S. border and is designed to detect changes in arousal, behavior and cognitive effort that may signal stress, risk or credibility.”

In the same message, Dr. Nunamaker pointed me to a then-recent article in which the AVATAR system was described as one that uses “speech recognition and voice-anomaly-detection software” to flag certain exchanges “as questionable and worthy of follow-up interrogation.”

Those exchanges, according to the article, “are color coded green, yellow or red to highlight the potential severity of questionable responses.”  Ring familiar?

Further into the article, reporter Larry Greenemeier relied upon Aaron Elkins, a post-doctoral researcher who helped develop the system, to provide an explanation of how anomaly detection is employed by AVATAR.

After stating that it is based on vocal characteristics, Elkins explained a number of ways in which a person’s voice might tip the program.  One of his explanations was particularly interesting.

“The kiosk’s speech recognition software monitors the content of an interviewee’s answers and can flag a response indicating when, for example, a person acknowledges having a criminal record.”

Elkins clarified his views further during an interview eight days later.

“I will stress that is a very large leap to say that they’re lying…or what they’re saying is untrue — but what it does is draw attention that there is something going on,” he said.  At the end of that statement, reporter Som Lisaius added seven words — precisely the intent behind any credibility assessment — with which I’m certain every [sic] Computer Voice Stress Analyzer® examiner I’ve interviews during the past four years would agree.

To even the most-impartial observer, Elkins’ explanations confirm beyond a shadow of a doubt that BORDERS researchers believe stress can be detected in the voice utterances of individuals facing real-life jeopardy.

NOTE:  Though I tried twice between August 2012 and February 2013 to find out from officials at the BORDERS program how much funding they have received from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and all other sources since the inception of the program, I received no replies to my inquiries.

To learn more about why federal government agencies are funding this kind of research despite the fact a polygraph replacement already exists and has proven itself in a wide range of applications, one must understand that a technological “turf war” is to blame and has been raging silently for more than 40 years.  Details of that turf war can be found inside The Clapper Memo.

It comes highly recommended. ORDER A COPY TODAY!

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Bob McCarty Weekly Recap: Nov. 1-7, 2015

After reading several new articles and dozens of status updates, you know a little about what I’ve been doing this week. In order to provide you a more-thorough look at what I’ve bee up to, I offer this weekly recap for the first seven days of November 2015.

Is it just me or does Butters, my office assistant, have hair like Donald Trump?

Is it just me or does Butters, my office assistant, have hair like Donald Trump?

Sunday, Nov. 1

I began the week at BobMcCarty.com by resharing a four-year-old piece in which I describe how, on Day Two of the Army’s court-martial of Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart, a prosecution attorney cited Wikipedia as a source while questioning Sergeant Stewart about his training. As one of the Army’s finest Green Berets, he deserved better. Read about it under the headline, SHOCK: Army Prosecutor Cited Wikipedia as Source During Green Beret’s Court-Martial on Sexual Assault Charges.

I began the week on my Facebook page by sharing a link to a McClatchy News article, The Buzz with Buzz: Benghazi & Hillary’s emails are history repeating itself, and offering this comment: “Speaker Paul Ryan will make sure Hillary goes to jail! Oh yeah! No doubt about it! She’s going down!” < NOT >

In addition, I shook my head in wonder while watching the CBS Sunday Morning segment about a gay black painter said to be doing “revolutionary” work that commands as much as $400,000 per piece, and I shared a video to honor some fallen warriors few people ever hear about.

On a lighter note nestled among several football- and cat-related items, I asked readers to take a look at a photo (top of page above) and answer a question — “Is it just me or does Butters, my office assistant, have hair like Donald Trump?”

Monday, Nov. 2

On Monday, I was engaged in research and, as a result, posted no new articles. I did, however, share several items on my Facebook page. For instance, I recalled how, on that day three years earlier, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction had issued two new reports about the situation in that country and how, in 2012, I had reached one conclusion about the contents of those reports: “A quick review of the two reports seems to indicate things are not only going downhill in this war-torn country, but they’re going downhill fast.” I closed my Facebook update by writing, “I don’t do this often, but I’ll do it today: ‘I told you so!'”

Tuesday, Nov. 3

Under the Tuesday headline, Help Find World War II Hero by Veterans Day, I shared details about an effort to locate a World War II Soldier whose likeness was captured in a portrait drawn by one of his German prisoners of war. Click here or on the portrait to read the article, realizing we now have only four days remaining to find him by Veterans Day.

Do you know the name of the American World War II Soldier shown in this sketch drawn by one of the German prisoners of war for whom he was responsible? If so, contact me.

Do you know the name of the American World War II Soldier shown in this sketch drawn by one of the German prisoners of war for whom he was responsible? If so, contact me.

On my Facebook page Tuesday, I lamented the loss of daylight hours and how I had decided to tackle it by changing up my exercise routine by adding a pre-breakfast workout in case I didn’t make it to my favorite lake before darkness fell. I explained how the “change” began at 5:30 a.m. and involved walking one mile and running one mile while listening to Twenty-One Pilots. “Who?” you say. My youngest son went to their concert over the weekend, so I decided I should find out the answer to that question, too. While their music is better than their photo, their songs are probably not gonna be among my first jukebox choices.

Also on my Facebook page, I noted an ABC News report about Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. speculating that ISIS might have brought down the Russian passenger jet Saturday. In response, I wrote, “I’m sure they did not,” before explaining that my opinion was based on why I uncovered during the four years I spent investigating things with Clapper’s “fingerprints” all over them — things you can read about in my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo.

“Very interesting. Answers? I have none.” I used those words to describe the content of a NASA video (above) captured by astronauts on the International Space Station Oct. 29. What do you think about this item I shared on my Facebook page?

Of course, I could ask the same thing about this video.

Wednesday, Nov. 4

On Wednesday, I shared a Washington Free Beacon video on my Facebook page. Posted below, it requires no explanation.

i offered a sarcastic call for “KNIFE CONTROL NOW!” after coming across this CNN report about a stabbing incident at the University of California-Merced. FYI: The perpetrator involved in the stabbings was Faisal Mohammad, an 18-year-old who wrote a two-page manifesto, according to another CNN report. Sadly, Merced County Sheriff Vern Warnke was reluctant to describe the incident as anything but “a teenage boy that got upset with fellow classmates and took it to the extreme.” Really?

Thursday, Nov. 5

On Thursday, I shared a message received from the wife of a military man who was wrongly accused and convicted of sexual assault by a woman, whom I later discovered had made similar allegations against two other ex-husbands. Read her chilling message under the headline, Wife Offers Details About Wrongly-Accused Husband’s Case.

Click on image above to read about military justice gone wrong.

Click on image above to read about military justice gone wrong.

I also noted how I was still waiting for two top Army officials to respond to the letters I had mailed nine days earlier regarding the subject of Fort Campbell officials failing to fulfill my recent Freedom of Information Act request.

On my Facebook page, I shared another political jab — this one aimed at Hillary Clinton. “I think Hillary Clinton should apply to become the first female former first lady to fly in space,” I wrote while introducing a link to the NASA webpage where she could apply. “She can run for president after she returns from Mars with an accomplishment on her resume.”

In another status update that day, I shared details about Haitians lambasting the American Red Cross for spending so little out of the half-billion dollars in donations it has received since earthquakes ravaged the island nation in 2010. Not surprised by the claim, I went to the ARC website for the “Haiti Assistance Program” and looked at the numbers ARC is touting:

$448,000,000 Donated minus $173,000,000 Used equals $275,000,000 Unused

In other words, many dirt-poor Haitians have waited 5 years for help while ARC sits on a “nest egg” of $275,000. That prompted me to ask, “Can anyone say special prosecutor?”

Friday, Nov. 6

The most important thing I did Friday involved mailing a letter to the National Archives at St. Louis. In it, I requested information about a former Army Soldier who, I’ve been told, lives an active life and works full time despite receiving benefits while categorized as “100 percent disabled.” His wife, a basic training washout, also reportedly collects benefits after being diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder as a result of something that happened during her three days in the military. What might have caused her issues? Stay tuned for updates.

FOIA Letter 11-5-15

Saturday, Nov. 7

Today, I will enjoy the sunshine and exercise a bit before settling in to watch my Oklahoma State Cowboys, #10 in the coaches poll, defeat Texas Christian University, #3 in the same poll. They play at 2:30 p.m. Central on Lewis Field, inside the confines of T. Boone Pickens Stadium in Stillwater, Okla. GO POKES!

Thanks in advance for reading and sharing the articles above and those to follow. You can show your support and help keep these articles coming by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.



Dr. Ben Carson Raises Good Question About Syrian Refugees

I’m not ready to cast my vote for Dr. Ben Carson, but I applaud the Republican presidential candidate. On Monday night, the retired neurosurgeon from Maryland raised the same question I raised earlier the same day — How Will We Screen Out Terrorists Among Syrian Refugees?

Raised during an interview with CNN’s John Berman Monday, Dr. Carson’s concerns came, much like mine did, less than 48 hours after President Barack Obama announced the United States will welcome 10,000 Syrian refugees for resettlement over the next 12 months. Now, I’m left wondering if he read the article I published yesterday. But I digress. UPDATE 9/16/2015 at 4:01 p.m. Central: It turns out that the president is going to allow 10,000 more than originally planned. For details, see this Bloomberg report published today.

If you have a close or direct connection to Dr. Carson’s campaign team, please let me know. I’d love to send him a copy of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, or meet with members of his team to bring them up to date on the proven vetting technology discussed in the book.

The technology discussed in The Clapper Memo was proven highly accurate and effective in places like Afghanistan, Guantanamo Bay and Iraq before it was unceremoniously banned by the powers that be inside the Department of Defense, including James R. Clapper Jr., the man now serving as director of National Intelligence. It’s now being used by more state and local law enforcement agencies than any other, including polygraph. And it should must be used on every prospective refugee trying to enter the country, regardless of their country of origin.

Hope to hear from someone in the Carson Camp soon!

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

How Will We Screen Out Terrorists Among Syrian Refugees?

Over the weekend, President Barack Obama announced the United States will welcome 10,000 Syrian refugees for resettlement over the next 12 months. Now, sane Americans must wonder how government officials will screen out terrorists among the refugees entering the country through refugee processing centers in almost every state.

This U.S. Department of State map shows where refugees, including those from Syria, will be sent.

This U.S. Department of State map shows where refugees, including those from Syria, will be sent.

The transcript of a State Department background briefing for reporters Sept. 9 offers some clues about how those ostensibly in charge of the nation’s foreign affairs programs — including Secretary of State John “F’n” Kerry and other left-wing political appointees — plan to ensure no members of the Islamic State and other Islamic terror groups enter the United States under the guise of being refugees. Michael Gordon of The New York Times asked the first question:

“Could you tell us, please, what the range of numbers is? You say you want to – the Secretary wants to increase the number of refugees that are admitted, so what is the range you’re looking at and what does that cost? And then it seems that part of the problem is vetting, in that the UN has submitted a list but it takes a long time to vet these people. Are you looking at committing more resources to speed up that vetting process? Thank you.”

As someone who spent four years investigating the federal government’s use of so-called credibility assessment technologies in places like Afghanistan, Guantanamo Bay and Iraq, I’m more aware than most of the capabilities that exist within our defense and intelligence agencies for conducting background checks and vetting (a.k.a., “screening”) foreign nationals. That awareness makes me more than a bit interested in the response of an unidentified “senior State Department official” to Gordon’s question. It appears below with acronyms deciphered by yours truly:

“The Secretary talked about a range of different numbers, but I will not be sharing them with you today. And there was varying views within the group from the judiciary committees of the House and Senate about how receptive they were to increasing the numbers of refugees coming.

“And the process to bring refugees here is careful and deliberate, and that’s – as a result, it takes a while. It takes between 18 to 24 months between when a refugee is referred to us and when they – if approved, when they end up arriving in the United States. And a big reason for this is the care that’s put into the security vetting for them. It involves several aspects. Part of it is that every refugee has their sort of case file put together with help from organizations that we fund overseas, and then those files and the refugees’ families themselves are interviewed by someone from the Department of Homeland Security, from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. And then we also check their names against a whole series of U.S. Government databases to make sure that they’re not already in there – some sort of derogatory information about them.

“What we’re trying to do is weed out people who are liars, who are criminals, or would-be terrorists. And this is something that slows down the process and it’s taken very seriously by everyone involved in it.”

The response, especially the description of the security vetting process having “several aspects” and being “careful and deliberate,” reminds me of what I was told repeatedly over a period of several months in 2012 by U.S. military public affairs officers speaking on behalf of the now-defunct International Security Assistance Force, precursor to the Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan. An excerpt from a July 12, 2012, statement appears below:

“We (ISAF) have today, just as we discussed back in April, advise the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) in assisting them to develop improvements to the overall vetting and recruitment process for the ANSF. The 8-step vetting process, which we have discussed in the past, is the result of our advising on this issue. Just like everything else that we (ISAF) advise on in Afghanistan, it is an ongoing and continuous process. We continually advise our Afghan partners on ways to improve processes. Again, the Afghans have the lead and are responsible for vetting their recruits into their security forces.”

Two months after receiving the statement above via email, I learned Afghans had not been in charge of all of the vetting taking place in that country. Instead, U.S. Army personnel were doing much of the vetting and, by September 2012, had grown “increasingly frustrated” with the eight-step vetting process that turned out to be largely ineffective at stopping so-called “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attacks, the often-deadly surprise attacks waged against U.S. and coalition forces by allegedly-trustworthy Afghans wearing the uniforms of Afghan military, police or security agencies.

And therein lies the problem with vetting 10,000 Syrian refugees, a group Nicholas Rasmussen, director of the National Counterterrorism Center, described as “clearly a population of concern” during a meeting of the House Committee on Homeland Security last week. [UPDATE at 7:55 p.m. Central: UK Prime Minister David Cameron has been warned that two out of every 100 Syrian refugees are Islamic State fighters.]

If federal government officials are not willing to subject Syrian refugees to the same highly-effective interrogation technology that was used to interrogate members of Saddam Hussein’s inner circle (a.k.a., “The Deck of Cards”) as well as hundreds of al-Qaeda and Taliban terrorists and other detainees at Guantanamo Bay and elsewhere around the world, then we might as well plan to see a significant increase in the number of terror attacks waged on U.S. soil.

At a bare minimum, we will likely see more cities experience the types of refugee problems the folks in Minneapolis are facing.

Click on image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo by Bob McCarty.

Click on image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo by Bob McCarty.

To learn more about the no-touch, no-torture, no-pain non-polygraph interrogation technology that was used with great success before its use by Department of Defense personnel was banned in October 2007 by James R. Clapper Jr., then Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence and now Director of National Intelligence (i.e., nation’s top intelligence official), visit TheClapperMemo.com. There, you’ll find an overview of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, as well as several stellar endorsements the book has received. FYI: You’ll also be able to order a copy of the book!

h/t Zero Hedge

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Army Soldier-Aviator Faces Possible 58-Year Sentence As Pentagon’s Sexual Assault Witch Hunt Seeks New Victim

Maj. Christian “Kit” Martin is an Army Ranger and master Army aviator with some 1,000 hours of combat flying time, including 500 while using night-vision gear. Though he’s been to war and back three times, fighting both on the ground and in the air, nothing prepared the 47-year-old for the battle he’s fighting now, trying to avoid becoming another victim of the Pentagon’s sexual assault witch hunt that could send him to prison for 58 years for something he did not do.

Maj. Christian “Kit” Martin stands in front of an AH-64D Longbow helicopter.

Maj. Christian “Kit” Martin stands in front of an AH-64D Longbow helicopter in Balad, Iraq, in 2008. Though he’s piloted the U.S. Army’s most-sophisticated attack helicopters, nothing prepared him for his battle with the military justice system.

Facing dubious sexual assault allegations, Major Martin’s case is set to go to trial Oct. 12 Dec. 1* inside a military courtroom at Fort Campbell, Ky. In addition to having his stellar military career ended, he faces the very-real possibility of spending the rest of his life behind bars if found guilty.

The man chiefly responsible for the court-martial push is Maj. Gen. Mark R. Stammer, now commander of Africa Command’s Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa.

Maj. Gen. Mark R. Stammer, gives Secretary of State John Kerry a tour of Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, May 6.

Maj. Gen. Mark R. Stammer, gives Secretary of State John Kerry a tour of Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, May 6.

At the time of his hands-on involvement in Major Martin’s case, General Stammer was a brigadier general — a “one-star” serving as acting commanding general at Fort Campbell where troops often referred to him as “Stammer the Hammer.” Like so many of his fellow graduates of “charm school,” the course where general officer selectees undergo grooming prior to their first star-studded assignments, General Stammer knew he would never get a second star if he didn’t “play ball” with his Pentagon bosses who were — and still are — under intense pressure from politically-correct politicians in Washington, D.C., demanding military leaders deliver swift and severe punishment for anyone accused of sexual assault.


As important as it is to understand what has taken place in the case already and what lies ahead, it’s equally important to understand the man at the center of this sexual assault witch hunt.

As a young man, Martin earned the rank of Eagle Scout before joining the U.S. Army Reserve a a private in 1986 and working his way up to E-5. Soon after, he worked a full-time job at night while studying during the day at the University of Nebraska-Omaha. Four years later, he graduated with honors as the distinguished graduate of its ROTC program. More importantly, he received his coveted Regular Army commission as a second lieutenant and began his new life. That life included marrying his first love, Stacey, in 1991, and welcoming a daughter into their world two years later, followed by two sons. He was on the right path.

Gen. Raymont T. Odierno, USA Ret.

Gen. Raymont T. Odierno, USA Ret.

During his first three years as an officer, Martin completed Ranger School and served a stint at Fort Ord, Calif., before moving on to Fort Lewis, Wash. There, he served as a company executive officer for Raymond T. Odierno, a lieutenant colonel who would go on to earn four stars and serve as chief of staff of the Army before retiring this year. A man who wrote Martin a “top of the line” officer evaluation and made note of his “unquestionable integrity.”

In December 1993, Martin left active duty and joined the Tennessee Army National Guard. One month later, he began flight school at Fort Rucker, Ala. After graduation one year later, he began a stint with TNARNG that would last almost 11 years and involve flying OH-58, UH-60, AH-64 and AH-1F Cobra attack helicopters and serving as commander of a Cobra company and as Brigade Aviation Officer for the 278 Armored Cavalry Regiment under Max Haston, a colonel who went on to earn several promotions before being named Adjutant General for the Tennessee National Guard.

While Martin’s work with TNARNG prepared him well for his professional future, his marriage to his first wife didn’t fare as well and, as the family’s time in Tennessee neared it’s end in early 2004, they divorced amicably. Martin’s wife soon remarried and, he maintains, his relationships with her and their three children — one daughter and two sons — are very good.


A few months after the divorce, Major Martin was contacted by a woman via Yahoo! Personals, and they began a relationship. During the first year of their relationship, Martin said, the woman told him about the two men who had fathered her children. He recalled her telling him that the father of her oldest child, a boy, had been decapitated prior to his birth in a logging accident in Oregon; and he remembered her talking about having had to obtain a restraining order against the Guatemala-born father of her two girls after he allegedly sexually abused them. On top of that, he said she claimed he was still stalking them at the time.

Taking her at her word and believing her children might truly be at risk, Major Martin said he rented a U-haul and moved her and her children to a rental house he owned. In addition to allowing the four to live there for free, he provided money for food and other necessities and gave her time to adjust. At the same time, he considered ending their dating relationship but did not. Instead, the relationship continued.

Major Martin said the courtship flourished and, after a whirlwind seven-month relationship, they exchanged vows Dec. 7, 2004. At that time, he assumed much of the parental and all of the financial responsibilities for her three children — two girls and a boy, then ranging in age from 7 years to 9 months.

In July 2005, Major Martin applied to return to active duty and was approved. One month later, he and his new family began a five-year stint in Germany that included three deployments to Iraq  and led to him to receive — with the help of a letter of recommendation from a three-star general — a coveted slot at the U.S. Navy War College in Newport, R.I.

Major Christian "Kit" Martin is shown at the controls of an AH-64A Apache helicopter in Iraq.

Major Christian “Kit” Martin is shown at the controls of an AH-64A Apache helicopter in Iraq.

After relocating his family to Rhode Island in May 2010, Major Martin completed the one-year course with honors and earned his master’s degree before moving his family back to Fort Campbell. There, his adult daughter became a member of the household. It was while he began serving in the vaunted 101st Airborne Division the proverbial “shit” began to hit the fan and he probably began to wonder if getting married on the 63rd anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor had been such a good idea after all.


Though warning signs had surfaced earlier in their relationship, Major Martin pointed to one milestone date — Sept. 5, 2012 — on which he decided he had had enough of what he described as “the cheating, abuse, and turmoil the woman seemed intent on dishing out” and asked her for a divorce. In response, he said she threatened him in front of his adult daughter, screaming words to the effect of “I will ruin your life if you divorce me. I will ruin your career, I can do it. I’ll tell them you’re abusive….”

Rather than wait for her to take action, Major Martin called the police, and officers who came to the home and investigated found no evidence of a physical confrontation.  After that, he and his daughter left for the night.

The next day, Major Martin said, the woman responded by seeking an emergency protection order from a local judge. As a result of the EPO being issued automatically and temporarily until a hearing could take place, he and his adult daughter were forced to vacate the home for several weeks. While they were away, the woman and a male neighbor with whom she was close ransacked the home and destroyed its contents, including many irreplaceable items.

Two weeks later at a family court hearing about validating the EPO, the extension was denied after questions arose regarding the truthfulness of statements made by the woman and her children.

Two months into the drama, Major Martin said, his lawyer found evidence the woman he was trying to divorce had never legally been divorced from the father of her two youngest children. He reported her bigamy to Army agencies, but no action was taken.

Soon after she learned about the lawyer’s findings during divorce negotiations, she and the aforementioned male neighbor went to the FBI with an outlandish claim that Major Martin was an international spy and proceeded to hand over an inoperable $60 laptop computer and several compact discs allegedly containing classified information as “evidence” of his alleged illicit activities. Though their statements about the time and the place they supposedly found these items did not match, FBI officials still alerted the Army about the claims. Soon after, Army counter-intelligence officials began an extensive investigation that included surveillance and wiretapping as well as an extensive search of his off-post home and interrogation sessions that included a lengthy polygraph exam.

Major Martin said he knew he was innocent. He knew he had never visited or had contact with anyone at the Maryland-based military intelligence unit to which the computer had belonged, and he had been assigned to Germany during the entire period the laptop in question was in the Army inventory. On top of that, he had never mishandled classified materials — more less, taken such materials home with him.

While under investigation, Major Martin said he was not only blacklisted by the Army and ordered to undergo domestic violence counseling for one year — a career killer for an officer, but he was also reassigned by General Stammer — and later fired from the coveted aviation officer position with his unit. He also lost the chance to deploy to Afghanistan with his unit and, afterward, to attend British Advanced Command and Staff College. While checking on the status of the latter, he learned his personnel file had been “flagged” and took his concerns about that action to the Army Inspector General. His career hung in limbo for two years.

In the end, the Army counter-intelligence investigators cleared Major Martin of any wrongdoing connected to the allegedly-stolen items, including the laptop that had been out of the Army inventory for seven years. But the damage had already been done. And more would follow.


After learning about the aforementioned “flag” on his personnel file, Major Martin said members of his family — including his father, a retired Air Force chief master sergeant, and his sister, a retired Air Force nurse — contacted General Stammer and warned him they would “go public” about the “irregularities” in the case. Soon after, the general ordered Military Police Investigations to launch a new investigation and tried to give the major an Article 15 — another career killer for an officer.

When Major Martin tried to request an unbiased adjudicating authority, he said Army prosecutors blocked his meeting with the division commander and began trying to dig up new reasons to charge him and force a court-martial, ignoring the fact he had already been cleared by military and civilian investigatory agencies.

On June 18, 2014, Major Martin learned he was facing 13 new charges which seemed to be a product of Army prosecutors working with his accuser to find something — anything — with which to charge him. This time, he said, the angry woman in his life alleged he had sexually abused the woman and her three children on diverse occasions between 2007 and 2012. Interestingly, he said he learned later that the allegations were almost identical to ones she had made against the father of her two girls ten years earlier. Those allegations were never prosecuted because, according to Martin, the local prosecutor had been unable to locate the woman’s husband.

Major Martin denied all of the charges against him and was, at one point, willing to resign his Regular commission simply to bring the matter to an end and not stress his family, including his elderly parents, any more. His offer did not, however, mean he was guilty. Instead, he simply wanted to avoid the possibility of being found guilty by the severely-flawed Army criminal justice system — the same one that’s under pressure to punish individuals for even being the target of allegation — and being sentenced to 58 years in prison. General Stammer, however, recommended he not be allowed to resign. In doing so, he opted to ignore two key findings:

First, he ignored the findings of the investigating officer who, because he was aware investigators with the Commonwealth of Kentucky’s Cabinet for Health and Family Services had issued a finding almost 18 months earlier that all allegations of child abuse and/or neglect against Major Martin were unsubstantiated, recommended no action be taken against Major Martin; and

Second, he ignored similar advice from LTC Robert Insani, his top legal advisor as the staff judge advocate at Fort Campbell.

General Stammer, it seems, was simply unwilling to risk his chance for promotion over the fate of a mere field-grade officer. The prosecution of Major Martin would continue!


On July 15, 2014, the prosecutor for the Commonwealth’s Attorney for Christian County, Ky., announced news that should have weighed heavily on General Stammer’s decision to move toward a court-martial date. She had been charged with one count of felony bigamy. Four days later, she was arrested, taken to the county jail and released on $5,000 bond until her trial begins Oct. 22, less than two weeks after Major Martin’s court-martial is set to begin.

Six months later, a grand jury in Coffee County, Tenn., indicted her for the same thing. She has not, however, been tried. Beyond those charges, I’m told she could face additional federal charges for defrauding TRICARE, the military healthcare system, for eight years while posing as Major Martin’s spouse.

Of course, there are many more sordid details in this case, but I think I’ve given enough to show Major Martin is on his way to becoming a victim of a kangaroo court-martial if someone in power — be it General Stammer or Brig. Gen. John E. Novalis II, the new commanding general who assumed command at Fort Campbell Aug. 17 — doesn’t step up and take action.

To show people in charge of this kangaroo court-martial effort how you feel about the case against Major Martin, contact your elected officials as well as the officials listed below and let them know the prosecution of this Soldier, who’s already been cleared of wrongdoing by multiple investigations, needs to end immediately!

Maj. Gen. Mark R. Stammer
c/o CJTF-HOA Public Affairs Office
Phone: +253 21-359-523
Email: africom.cldj.cjtf-hoa.mbx.public-affairs@mail.mil

Maj. Gen. Gary Volesky
c/o 101st Airborne Division
Bldg. 2700, Indiana Avenue
Fort Campbell, KY 42223
(270) 798-3025

Mr. Ashton Carter
Secretary of Defense
1400 Defense Pentagon
Washington, DC 20301-1400

Mr. Jon T. Rymer
Inspector General
U. S. Department of Defense
4800 Mark Center Drive
Alexandria, VA 22350-1500

John M. McHugh
Secretary of the Army
1400 Defense Pentagon
Washington, DC 20301-1400

General Mark A. Milley
Chief of Staff, United States Army
1400 Defense Pentagon
Washington, DC 20301-1400

Senator Rand Paul
167 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington DC, 20510
(202) 224-4343

Senator Mitch McConnell
317 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2541

Senator Lamar Alexander
455 Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224-4944

Senator Bob Corker
425 Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3344

NOTE: Contact information for officials listed above has been updated since first publication.

Please share this news and stay tuned for updates about this case as it moves forward!

UPDATE: The trial date was moved back to Dec. 1. More details at here.

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