Tag Archives: Constitutional Rights

Saint Louis Police Admit to Using Illegal Surveillance Tech

A St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department official confirmed today that its officers are using cell phone simulator technology many believe is illegal and violates citizens’ privacy.

This screenshot shows the text of an email I received today from Schron Jackson of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department.

This screenshot shows the text of an email I received today from Schron Jackson of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department.

As a follow-up to a piece I wrote and published Nov. 17 and as a result of reading several articles (see examples here and here) about the technology, I fired off two questions to SLMPD spokesperson Schron Jackson Feb. 23:

1) Has the department purchased, or obtained via any other means, any items under any of the names Kingfish, AmberJack, HailStorm or Stingray? and

2) Has the department purchased, or obtained via any other means, any items from Harris Corporation of Melbourne, Florida, during the past 10 years?

In an email message received today, 31 days later, at 12:52 p.m. Central, Jackson wrote the following:

The St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department does possess a cell site simulator that is designed to allow our personnel to locate a lawfully targeted cellphone. The cell site simulator is a particularly effective tool and has assisted greatly in keeping the citizens of our community safe.  Unfortunately, there are widely held misconceptions about the usage of cell site simulators, partly as a result of law enforcement’s decision to not disclose specific information about the devices.  In the case of cell site simulators, numerous federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies have determined that the public release of technical details, applications, and operational procedures would create a significant detriment to the protection of their communities by providing criminal elements with the ability to circumvent the devices.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not anti-law enforcement. I am, however, against government agencies infringing upon my Constitutional right against unlawful search and seizure.

If you agree with me, contact  SLMPD Chief Sam Dotson via Twitter (@ChiefSLMPD) or through Jackson via her email address (MEDIA@slmpd.org or syjackson@slmpd.org) or phone (314-444-5603 or 314-444-5604). Be forewarned, however, that it might take her a month or longer to respond.

UPDATE 4/19/2015 at 10 a.m. Central:  According to this St. Louis Post-Dispatch article, the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department’s use of illegal cell phone simulator technology forced prosecutors to drop more than a dozen charges against three defendants.

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Are STL Cops Using Illegal Surveillance Equipment?

I’m not anti-law enforcement, but I am against government agencies infringing upon my Constitutional right against unlawful search and seizure. So when I came across evidence members of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Board of Police Commissioners solicited bids for Stingray II surveillance system, I simply had to share it.

My discovery came Sunday afternoon, three months after reading a Popular Science article about one man’s discovery of phony cell towers installed at 17 locations across the country and only a few minutes after reading a learn about cell tower lease rates here if you have spare land you’d like to capitalise on. But not all cell towers are as innocent as that.
=”https://www.rutherford.org/publications_resources/freedom_watch/documents_houston_police_use_stingray_surveillance_technology_to_sweep_up_c” target=”_blank”>Rutherford Institute piece about police in Houston using Stingray II equipment (a.k.a., “interceptors”) to illegally intercept and steal data from cell phones.

Curious, I conducted a quick web search which led to the discovery of a document, the Oct. 16, 2012, edition of The City Journal: Official Publication of THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS, posted online by the ACLU. Though I rarely rely upon the ACLU for any information, an entry on page 15 of the document reveals members of the St. Louis Board of Police Commissioners issued an “INVITATION TO BID” for “Stingray II System/Parts/Training, Installation & Integration of Stingray II System in Chevrolet Tahoe, and a 2012 Chevrolet Tahoe.”

Now, I’m left with two questions: 1) Did members of the St. Louis Board of Police Commissioners follow through and purchase the Stingray II surveillance equipment and related items? and 2) Are members of the Metropolitan St. Louis Police Department using the technology?

I suspect answers to the two questions above will not be forthcoming. Why? Because, according to The Rutherford Institute folks, many local police departments across the nation have obtained the technology and have kept its use secret, citing nondisclosure agreements with Harris Corporation, the technology’s manufacturer, and the FBI. Still, I’ll try to find out.

Stay tuned!

UPDATE 12/16/2014 at 8:24 p.m. Central: After waiting three days for an answer, the folks at the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department replied, saying, “The item was never purchased.”

UPDATE 3/11/2015 at 6:28 p.m. Central: On Feb. 23, after reading this article, I submitted the two follow-up questions below to Schron Y. Jackson, public information officer, at the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department:

1) Has the department purchased, or obtained via any other means, any items under any of the names Kingfish, AmberJack, HailStorm or Stingray?

2) Has the department purchased, or obtained via any other means, any items from Harris Corporation of Melbourne, Florida, during the past 10 years?

Sixteen days and two follow-up attempts later, I’m still waiting for an answer. Why?

UPDATE 3/16/2015 at 9:12 p.m. Central: Despite leaving phone messages and sending follow-up emails. Still no answer. Why?

UPDATE 3/18/2015 at 7:51 a.m. Central: Another email sent without results. Are they hiding something? Certainly looks that way.

UPDATE 4/19/2015 at 10:01 a.m. Central: According to this St. Louis Post-Dispatch article, the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department’s use of illegal cell phone simulator technology forced prosecutors to drop more than a dozen charges against three defendants. FYI: Same update posted to new article, Saint Louis Police Admit to Using Illegal Surveillance Tech.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Polygraph Examiner’s Tactics Cost Taxpayers Millions

How much does it cost American taxpayers when polygraph is used in a criminal investigation? Members of a federal court jury in Putnam County, N.Y., decided Thursday it would cost them millions.

Click image above to learn more about Jeff Deskovic at The Innocence Project.

Click image above to learn more about Jeff Deskovic at The Innocence Project.

Jurors awarded Jeffrey Deskovic $40 million, according to one news report, after finding that ex-Putnam Sheriff’s Investigator Daniel Stephens fabricated evidence and coerced Deskovic’s false confession to the 1989 murder and rape of a Peekskill High School classmate. A pre-trial agreement, however, will limit the payout to $10 million.

The verdict comes almost eight years after DNA evidence proved Deskovic, now 41, was not involved in the crime. As far as I’m concerned, the most interesting aspect of this story can be found in a single paragraph:

The federal jury found that Stephens fabricated the ejaculation statement and, through his aggressive, hours-long polygraph examination, coerced Deskovic into confessing when he was interrogated again by Peekskill Detective Thomas McIntyre. Jurors also found Stephens conspired with detectives to violate Deskovic’s constitutional rights.

Why the interest on my part? Because Deskovic’s wrongful conviction was one of several I highlighted in my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo.

To learn more about The Clapper Memo, read other posts about the book.

To understand everything I’ve uncovered about the polygraph and other credibility assessment technologies, order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

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What Did Soldier’s Accuser Have to Hide From the Court?

“There was never a discussion about what Greta (Heinrich) was in (the mental institution) for,” said former U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart.  “She testified that she was only in for simple ‘burnout,’ but she would never provide her medical records (and) the jurors never got to know that.”

Kelly A. Stewart

Kelly A. Stewart

Unfortunately for the Special Forces member and elite Green Beret, his German accuser invoked her rights under German law to not disclose her medical records. Likewise, the German government refused to release copies of her medical records.

That led David Court, Stewart’s civilian defense attorney, to conclude that “She has obviously got something that she wishes to withhold.”

“If I was a juror and I found out that this chick was saying that someone had raped her, that she had spent time in a mental institution… and now she’s saying that this American service member…is being accused of rape, it would add a shadow of doubt in my mind and any normal person’s mind,” said Stewart.

In Three Days In August, I reveal details about this issue and many others that surfaced during the courtroom drama that, in less than 48 hours, resulted in Stewart being found guilty on sexual assault charges; and, in less than 72 hours, saw him sentenced to eight years behind bars. Based almost solely on the testimony of his accuser. No physical evidence. No eyewitnesses.

To learn more about Kelly Stewart and his brush with military justice, order a copy of Three Days In August.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

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