Tag Archives: endorsement

Throwback Thursday: Intelligence Agency Spotlights Clapper

Something interesting showed up in my inbox a few minutes after noon today under the headline, Throwback Thursday: DNI Clapper as DIA director.

Click on image above (if you dare) to read full article on DNI website.

Click on image above (if you dare) to read full article on DNI website.

Released by the Defense Intelligence Agency Office of Corporate Communications, this nostalgic piece begins by reminding all of how then-Air Force Lt. Gen. James R. Clapper Jr. was sworn in as the DIA’s 11th director Nov. 18, 1991. It ends by noting that Clapper now serves as director of national intelligence. I, however, am more interested in an action Clapper took while serving as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence, before he assumed his present role as our nation’s top intelligence official.

As our nation’s fourth USDI in October 2007, Clapper issued a memo in which he declared the polygraph to be the only credibility assessment technology authorized for use by employees of the Department of Defense. In doing that, according to Army Green Berets and Navy SEALs with whom I spoke during a four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of credibility assessment technologies, he effectively removed the best interrogation technology in existence from warfighters’ toolkits.

To understand the serious implications of Clapper’s directive, read some of the endorsements of the book — including two from retired, high-ranking military officers — that appear near the bottom of this page. To learn even more, order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Santa Claus Endorses The National Bet

Lo and behold, I ran into Santa Claus while this afternoon! Much to my surprise, he was holding an advance copy of my first fiction novel, The National Bet! Don’t know about you, but I’ll consider that an endorsement!

Santa Claus holds advance copy of The National Bet.

Santa Claus holds advance copy of The National Bet.

Be sure to add The National Bet to your Christmas shopping lists. You can pre-order the e-book now for virtual delivery Nov. 26. The paperback version of the novel goes on sale late next week. Stay tuned for details!

While you wait for The National Bet‘s release, feel free to order copies of my two nonfiction books, Three Days In August (October 2011) and The Clapper Memo (May 2013). Thanks!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Afghans in USA Missing After Vetting Process Fails Again

This morning, I came across a recent CBS News article about the disappearance of two Afghans who were in the United States to receive specialized training from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Based on what I learned during a four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, I believe Americans have reason to be concerned about these men.

Left to right: Mohd Naweed Samimi and Mohammad Yasin Ataye.

Left to right: Mohd Naweed Samimi and Mohammad Yasin Ataye.

Alarm bells began ringing in my mind after I read that, according to a DEA spokesperson cited in the article, Mohammad Yasin Ataye, 22, and Mohd Naweed Samimi, 24, were part of a group of 31 Afghan police officers participating in an intensive five-week training program to combat drug trafficking in Quantico, Va. Why? Because I learned long ago about the vetting process used to screen Afghans seeking positions with Afghan military, police and security agencies. It has worked so well that, during the seven years since Defense Department officials began keeping records of such attacks, 144 coalition members — mostly Americans — have been killed and 183 have been wounded [source] by supposedly-vetted individuals committing so-called “Green-on-Blue” attacks.

Click on image above to order book.

Click on image above to order book.

Alarm bells continued to sound off after I read the first sentence of the article’s fourth paragraph:  According to the DEA, each candidate is extensively vetted and polygraphed. A long line of Americans whose initial and continuing employment with federal government agencies (CIA, FBI, NSA et al) were subject to passing periodic polygraph examinations went on to be convicted of espionage against the United States. Most recently, Edward Snowden made the news for allegedly leaking a plethora of highly-classified intelligence data after passing polygraph exams.

To learn more about why I’m troubled by the disappearance of these Afghans, read The Clapper Memo. My second nonfiction book, it features never-before-published details obtained from top government officials, including individuals who interrogated members of Saddam Hussein‘s inner circle (i.e., “Deck of Cards”) and detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Plus, it has received rave reviews from some high-profile individuals.

To read other posts about The Clapper Memo, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

DoD Ban on Non-Polygraph Technology Continues

Almost 28 months ago, I came across a Military.com article about the Army telling Soldiers they could use only government-issued magazines with their M4 carbines.  In essence, they were told they could no longer — without violating orders, that is — use the widely-popular PMAG polymer M4 magazine manufactured by Magpul Industries Corp. Barely one month later, the ban was rescinded, according to this article, because it didn’t make sense. Now, it’s time to rescind another Defense Department ban on technology that doesn’t make sense.

I Company, 3rd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment live fire exercise 'Iron Anvil.' U.S. Army photo

I Company, 3rd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment live fire exercise ‘Iron Anvil.’ U.S. Army photo

In 2004, then-Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence Stephen Cambone declared the polygraph the only credibility assessment tool authorized for use by DoD personnel, but it didn’t take.  They kept using one they liked, because it worked.

In 2007, then-Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. issued a nearly-identical order, and it was largely ignored.

Only after a third ban was issued — this one by Admiral Eric T. Olson, then-commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, in 2008 — were all challengers to the polygraph finally cast adrift.

Why did it take DoD leaders three tries to make warfighters stop using their preferred non-polygraph credibility assessment technology? Because those warfighters refused to give up a tool they knew worked best — in places like Baghdad and Guantanamo Bay.

Want to learn more about the non-polygraph technology warfighters refused to stop using?  Details about it appear in my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo.

To learn more about the book and read some of the endorsements it has received, click here. To order a copy, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.