Tag Archives: hospital

GREEN BERET: ‘The next thing you know, it felt like someone put lighter fluid on me and caught me on fire’

Having already survived several combat deployments in Iraq, Army Special Forces Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart never expected to come face to face with death during a tour of “schoolhouse duty” at a NATO training center in Germany, but he did. Some of the details of the Green Beret’s brush with death appear in the excerpt below from my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August:

Kelly Stewart returns from a mission in Iraq.

Kelly Stewart returns from a mission in Iraq.

Panicking because they had eaten up some time, they began hooking up bottles and IVs and then another bad thing happened: Stewart had an allergic reaction to a drug the German doctors used and went into anaphylactic shock.

“(There’s) nothing like being double-handcuffed and (having) your feet shackled and strapped to a bed (while) going into anaphylaxis,” Stewart said. “I’ve seen a lot of people go through it, but being conscious and going through it is very difficult.

“It just started off as being real tight in the chest,” he continued. “The next thing you know, it felt like somebody put lighter fluid on me and caught me on fire.

“I couldn’t breathe at all, and everybody was kind of panicking around me, trying to give me medication to stop what was happening.”

Soon, the Germans said they didn’t have a doctor who could treat him, that he was probably having liver and kidney failure and was probably going to die. Their message to the American cops: “We need to get him out of here.”

“Of course, I’m understanding what the Germans are saying and what they’re telling the cops,” Stewart said. “They’re kind of underhanded, saying, ‘We can’t treat him here. We need to send him over to Landstuhl,’” the U.S. Army’s largest hospital in Europe.

“What they’re saying in German is, ‘We need to get him out of here, because he’s not going to survive,’ and they didn’t want that (outcome) in their hospital.”

To learn details about the events leading up to and following Stewart’s hospital stay, order a copy of Three Days In August today!

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Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Letters From 1918 Speak Volumes as Ebola Threat Looms

Because of the Ebola threat now facing the United States and the world, I thought I’d share links to three letters written during the influenza epidemic of 1918 that killed more than 50 million people worldwide. These letters should help to remind people of the horrors that have previously occurred in the world. Hopefully, this will make them take extra precautions to ensure that Ebola will not have as much of an impact as it did in 1918.

Ebola is a fatal disease that spreads from person to person through close contact. Previous outbreaks have shown that many people are vulnerable to this disease, so it’s vital that communities pull together to try and prevent an outbreak like the one in 1918, that unfortunately took so many lives.

Back then, hospital technology and protective wear were limited. This meant that a lot more people were able to catch and spread the disease. However, these days, we are lucky to have technology and science on our side to try and prevent another outbreak. Hopefully, we can take steps towards preventing the virus.
Should an Ebola outbreak occur again, we should be able to protect ourselves more effectively than the people in 1918 were able to do. Our medical staff, and the people of the United States, will be able to find a procedure face mask that can help us to prevent the spread, potentially reducing the number of deaths that Ebola can cause.

These letters that I have shared on this page should be able to inspire people to stay strong when times get tough, especially through scary times where fatal viruses and infections are spreading through communities. After reading these letters from 1918, I think you’ll agree that they speak volumes about man’s ability to deal with adversity. Stay safe everyone.

Click to download nurse's letter (PDF).

Click to download nurse’s letter (PDF).

Links to the letters appear below:

Letter from nurse to her friend at the Haskell Indian Nations University, Kansas, October 17, 1918;

Letter from visiting doctor reporting situation to superintendent, Albuquerque Day School, New Mexico, December 20, 1918; and

Record book of patients in South Beach, Washington hospital, 1918. Army Air Corps.

To view several images from the same time period, visit the National Archives page, THE DEADLY VIRUS: The Influenza Epidemic of 1918.

See also: Missouri Doctor Says ‘CDC IS LYING!’

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.