Why Can’t Elected Officials Force DIA to Comply With the Law?

I stand amazed at how much the responses I’ve received from Sen. Roy Blunt, Sen. Claire McCaskill and U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner have varied since Jan. 13 when I contacted the offices of these people who purport to represent me and my fellow citizens in the Show-Me State in the U.S. Congress and asked for help in dealing with officials at the Defense Intelligence Agency.

Ann Wagner FB Screen shot 2014-01-13 at 8.22.07 AM

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Congresswoman Wagner’s staff has been most responsive.  In fact, I received a phone call the same day I sent her both an email message and a message via Facebook.  Since then, I’ve exchanged multiple email messages with members of her staff.

Sadly, the congresswoman’s staffers have, so far, been able to generate only a cursory reply letter (dated Feb. 28 and received March 3) from James L. Kaplan, DIA’s Chief of Congressional Relations.

Senator Blunt’s staffers, on the other hand, have been a bit less responsive than Congresswoman Wagner’s, but not the worst among the Missouri delegation.  My correspondence with them began when I used the senator’s online communication tool to submit the following message:

Eighteen months ago, I filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the Defense Intelligence Agency.  In it, I requested copies of unclassified documents related to polygraph contracts.  To date, I have been thoroughly stonewalled.  Now, I need Senator Blunt’s help to find out why.

Beyond that, I included a link to an article in which I had outlined my experience to date with the DIA.  Senator Blunt’s staffers responded — via snail mail letter dated Feb. 12, not the much-quicker email — by sending me a Privacy Act Release Statement which I had to complete and return by snail mail.

Blunt-Blunt-McCaskill-LtrsIn an auto-signed letter dated March 11 and received a few days later, Senator Blunt informed me that he made contact with DIA officials and that they had responded to his inquiry.  Attached to it was a letter from Kaplan that was virtually identical to the one Congresswoman Wagner had received from Kaplan 11 days earlier.

639 Days (so far)

Click on image above to read about my DIA FOIA saga.

Dragging up the rear in this race to serve their constituent are members of Senator McCaskill’s staff.  Despite the fact I had reached out to “Claire Bear” on the same day and in the exact same manner as I had Senator Blunt, it took her staff 92 days — or 34 days longer — to reply with a letter (dated April 9) almost identical to the initial reply received from her Republican counterpart.

So, what is all of the fuss about?  As of today, I’ve waited exactly 21 months for DIA officials to comply with requirements of the Freedom of Information Act and fulfill my request for copies of unclassified documents related to Department of Defense purchases of polygraph equipment since Jan. 1, 2000.

And why have DIA officials worked so hard to keep this information out of my hands? Read my book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, and you’ll begin to understand their reluctance.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman’s Conflict of Interest Slows Benghazi Investigation

Like so many people, I’ve wondered why members of the Republican-controlled U.S. House of Representatives have dragged their feet so long on investigating the Benghazi debacle.  Now Dick Morris offers the answer:  House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) is to blame!  Watch the video!

In a just-released video, Morris reports that Rogers has been dragging his feet on the matter, because his wife, Kristi Clemens Rogers, was president and CEO of Aegis, L.L.C., the company that had the security contract at the time the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi was attacked.

Shocked?  Don’t be!  This isn’t the first time the Michigan congressman has been accused of acting in ways that would benefit his wife.  TechDirt reported on another issue less than a year ago under the headline, Oh Look, Rep. Mike Rogers Wife Stands To Benefit Greatly From CISPA Passing….

And does anyone think it’s a coincidence that the House Intelligence Committee chairman is giving up his seat for a job in talk radio after his current term ends?  I’m not!

SEE ALSO:  Dots Connect Bradley Manning, Benghazi, Afghanistan and Nation’s Top Intelligence Official.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Author Needs Honest Answers From Speakers at Nation’s Largest Intelligence Gathering

Originally scheduled to take place six months ago but postponed due to the government shutdown, GEOINT 2013* Symposium is now set for April 14-17 in Tampa, Fla.  Touted as the largest intelligence event in the U.S., according to a news release issued by the United States Geospatial Intelligence Foundation, this event stands as a target-rich environment for someone like me who needs some honest answers from a handful of the event’s keynote speakers.

GeoInt_2013Atop the list of speakers from whom I’d like answers is Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., the man whose name appears in the title of my second and most-recent nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.  I’d like to ask DNI Clapper why, as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence seven years ago, he issued a memo declaring the polygraph the only authorized credibility assessment tool for use by Department of Defense personnel when a newer, more reliable and more effective credibility assessment technology was — and still is — available to U.S. military and intelligence personnel.

Second on my list is Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael T. Flynn. I’d like to ask the Army three-star general why I’ve had to wait 632 days (so far) for DIA officials to fulfill my Freedom of Information Act request for unclassified information related to DoD purchases of portable polygraph equipment during the past 12 years.  Specifically, I asked for the following information in my request July 16, 2012:

“…copies of any and all initial and follow-up contracts (i.e., solicitations, contracts, statements of work and task orders) related to the Portable Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) or Preliminary Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) that have been awarded by any Department of Defense Agency to Lafayette Instrument Company of Lafayette, Indiana, and any other contractors, academic institutions, laboratories and subcontractors from January 1, 2000, to present.”

Unfortunately, DIA’s only fulfillment to date, a mail parcel that I received May 9, 2013, fell far short of expectations.  It contained only 12 pages of documentation dating back only as far as June 25, 2010 — not to Jan. 1, 2000, as requested.  Coincidentally, the date that appeared atop the letter, May 2, 2013, was the exact day THE CLAPPER MEMO, the book for which I was seeking the information, was released.  Coincidence?  I think not.

Of course, there are others on the list of keynoters with whom I’d like to speak.

I’d like to ask three flag officers — Gen. Lloyd J. Austin III, commander of U.S. Central Command, Adm. William H. McRaven, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, and Lt. Gen. Raymond P. Palumbo, Director for Defense Intelligence for Warfighter Support in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence how they can look in the mirror each day while knowing a tool proven more effective and reliable than the century-old polygraph is being kept out of the hands of their front-line warriors.

U.S. Rep. C.A. "Dutch" Ruppersberger (D-Md)

U.S. Rep. C.A. “Dutch” Ruppersberger (D-Md)

Finally, I’d like to ask Maryland Congressman C.A. “Dutch” Ruppersberger why he, as Ranking Member of the U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, hasn’t shown more interest in this topic.  He was, after all, among the several dozen members of Congress who received copies of my book in which I point fingers and name names.

Based on the findings of my exhaustive four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of so-called credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, THE CLAPPER MEMO has received rave reviews from people who know what it’s like to have a “dog in the fight.”

To learn more about the book, visit http://TheClapperMemo.com.  To order a copy, click here or on the graphic below.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Author Not Surprised to Hear Retired General Say Muslim Brotherhood Inside Pentagon

When I heard retired Army Lt. Gen. Jerry Boykin telling an interviewer in the video below that he knows our government — including the Pentagon! — has been infiltrated at the highest levels by members of the radical Muslim Brotherhood, I wasn’t the least bit surprised. Why? I’ll explain after you watch the video below.

I wasn’t surprised, because I spent four years conducting an exhaustive investigation of the credibility assessment tools relied upon by federal government agencies and members of the contractor community as they screen individuals for employment, conduct background investigations and interrogate individuals suspected of criminal, terrorist and/or treasonous activities.

Along the way, I uncovered three separate memos — one of which was issued by then-Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., who now serves as Director of National Intelligence — via which senior Department of Defense officials informed all DoD personnel that the century-old polygraph was the only credibility assessment technology authorized for their use.

I also revealed the existence of a “turf war” that’s been raging silently for more than 40 years between polygraph loyalists unwilling to embrace a newer, more-reliable technology that’s already been embraced by more than 1,900 local and state law enforcement agencies nationwide.

General Boykin’s claims begin to make sense when one takes into consideration how well the polygraph has performed in several key areas:

• Despite what International Security Assistance Force officials once posted and later removed from the ISAF Facebook page, the portable polygraph deployed to Afghanistan certainly hasn’t improved the vetting process used to screen Afghan recruits or prevented record numbers of “Green-on-Blue” Attacks during the past five years.

• Periodic polygraph exams should have helped prevent the unauthorized disclosure of millions of classified and/or sensitive documents by people like Edward Snowden. Instead, he was able to pass the very polygraph exams that were supposed to have caught him.

• During the early days of the so-called “Global War on Terror,” officials at Guantanamo Bay found themselves unable to count on support from polygraph loyalists when it came time to interrogate detainees. And when they turned to a non-polygraph technology and began to realize extraordinary results, DoD officials removed the non-polygraph tool from their arsenal!

The general’s claim also makes sense when one considers that a Freedom of Information Act request, via which I seek to obtain copies of unclassified documents related to DoD contracts for purchases of polygraph equipment, is about to turn 20 months old.

Click image above to order.

Click image above to order.

It’s worth noting that I’m not the only one who believes what I share on this topic in my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely, a retired U.S. Army general who once served as deputy commander of U.S. Army Pacific, endorsed the book, wrote, “Bob McCarty has uncovered a high-tech ‘turf war’ pitting those who want the best for our troops against others who seem to be focused on their own self-interests. Sadly, it seems the wrong people are winning this war. I highly recommend THE CLAPPER MEMO.”

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, a retired U.S. Navy officer who once served as commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs training program, characterized what I expose in the book as “clearly an unconscionable cover-up of a capability of the U.S. military and intelligence community to vet incoming Afghan (or any other) military personnel.”

David P. Schippers, the man who served as Congressman Henry Hyde‘s chief investigative counsel during the Clinton Impeachment Hearings in the U.S. House of Representatives, described the book as “perhaps the most thorough investigative reporting I have encountered in years. I direct the attention of the so-called major media to it. This is how it’s done!”

Gold Star family members have praised the book, too.

MaryLiz Grossetto, the aunt of LCpl. Greg Buckley Jr., a 21-year-old Marine who died in Afghanistan in August 2012 as the result of a “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attack, read the book. Afterward, she offered this review: “Read this book & you will see how our government has for many, many years deprived our military of the best possible tool for vetting & weeding out the enemy.”

Billy and Karen Vaughn shared their observations about the book almost two years after their son, U.S. Navy SEAL Aaron Carson Vaughn, lost his life along with 29 other Americans when their helicopter, call sign “Extortion 17,” was shot down in Afghanistan Aug. 6, 2011. In their endorsement, they wrote, “THE CLAPPER MEMO by Bob McCarty gives the reader an in-depth look into the dirty little secrets of politics and greed triumphing over safety and security for our fighting men and women as well as the average American citizen.”

I hope you’ll take the opportunity to read the book, too!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Week Filled With Praise, Threats, Blunders and Prize Money

Those of you who follow me on Facebook know I’m on the homestretch of my first fiction novel with more than 300 pages completed and, I estimate, 100 pages to go.  When I wasn’t busy working on the novel, however, I found time to share four new pieces related to my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Click on image above to connect to article.

Click on image above to connect to article.

Under the Sunday headline, Townhall Columnist Praises My Latest Book, The Clapper Memo, I shared news about Townhall.com columnist Mark Baisley‘s review of the book, When Technology War Kills Our Own Soldiers.

In the last four words of the Monday headline, DoD Spokesman Labels “Insider Threat” to Troops in Afghanistan “As Dangerous As It Ever Was,” I highlighted the words of Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby after he was quoted in Stars and Stripes as saying the “insider threat” against American forces in Afghanistan is “as dangerous as it ever was.”  After he failed to mention them, I offered details about “insider attacks” in Afghanistan that I uncovered during the four-year investigation upon which THE CLAPPER MEMO is based.  Consider it a public service.

Click on image above to connect to article.

Click on image above to connect to article.

On Thursday, I was excited to see Washington Times reporter Rowan Scarborough had written an article about U.S. troops being left to fend for themselves in Afghanistan.  In particular, he shared details about the same type of poor Pentagon decision-making I exposed in THE CLAPPER MEMO.  Read about it under the headline, Defense Department Contracting Blunders Highlighted by Writers.  [Warning:  It might set your nose hairs on fire.]

Also on Thursday, I shared something from the STRANGE-BUT-TRUE files under the headline, Intel Chief Launches Contest to Find Already-Existing Technology.  Of course, it involves Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. and the decision by his folks at the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity to hold a contest that awards prize money to people who develop something that already exists.  That “something,” by the way, is at the heart of what I write about in THE CLAPPER MEMO.

I hope you’ll take a look at the stories above and, after you do, share your favorite articles with your friends and ORDER A COPY of THE CLAPPER MEMOThanks in advance!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Intel Chief Launches Contest to Find Already-Existing Technology

Officials at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence surprised me today when they issued a news release about the launch of a contest for which they plan to award $50,000 in prize money. Why was I surprised? Because the proven credibility assessment technology allegedly being sought by DNI James R. Clapper Jr. via his gang at the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity already exists!  Details are in my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Click image above to link to ODNI news release page.

Click image above to link to ODNI news release page.

During four years of exhaustive investigation into the use of credibility assessment technologies by federal government agencies, I learned how some 2,000 local and state law enforcement agencies are currently using the technology — known as the Computer Voice Stress Analyzer® — which relies on a proprietary computer algorithm that measures microtremors in the human voice.

In addition, I interviewed military, intelligence and private security company officials about their positive experiences with CVSA® in places like Guantanamo Bay and Iraq before the technology was stripped from their control by, among other things, a memo signed by DNI Clapper.

Interestingly, I also reviewed and dissected several of the available studies — including one done by officials at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory.

By the time I finished my research, I realized what — or, more accurately, who — is keeping CVSA® from being adopted on a widespread basis throughout the federal government. It’s the polygraph loyalists (i.e., people unwilling to change horses midstream even after realizing the century-old horses they’re riding are dead).

Click image above to order book.

Click image above to order book.

It’s worth noting that I’m not the only one who believes my findings!

When Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely, a retired U.S. Army general who once served as deputy commander of U.S. Army Pacific, endorsed the book, he wrote, “Bob McCarty has uncovered a high-tech ‘turf war’ pitting those who want the best for our troops against others who seem to be focused on their own self-interests. Sadly, it seems the wrong people are winning this war. I highly recommend THE CLAPPER MEMO.”

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, a retired U.S. Navy officer who once served as commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs training program, characterized what I expose in the book as “clearly an unconscionable cover-up of a capability of the U.S. military and intelligence community to vet incoming Afghan (or any other) military personnel.”
David P. Schippers, the man who served as Congressman Henry Hyde‘s chief investigative counsel during the Clinton Impeachment Hearings in the U.S. House of Representatives, described the book as “perhaps the most thorough investigative reporting I have encountered in years. I direct the attention of the so-called major media to it. This is how it’s done!”

MaryLiz Grossetto, the aunt of LCpl. Greg Buckley Jr., a 21-year-old Marine who died in Afghanistan in August 2012 as the result of a “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attack, read the book. Afterward, she offered this review: “Read this book & you will see how our government has for many, many years deprived our military of the best possible tool for vetting & weeding out the enemy.”

Finally, Billy and Karen Vaughn shared their observations about the book almost two years after their son, U.S. Navy SEAL Aaron Carson Vaughn, lost his life along with 29 other Americans when their helicopter, call sign “Extortion 17,” was shot down in Afghanistan Aug. 6, 2011. In their endorsement, they wrote, “THE CLAPPER MEMO by Bob McCarty gives the reader an in-depth look into the dirty little secrets of politics and greed triumphing over safety and security for our fighting men and women as well as the average American citizen.”

Rather than trust an INSTINCT, the acronym for the contest that looks somewhat like a federal government bureaucrat’s job title when spelled out (i.e., Investigating Novel Statistical Techniques to Identify Neurophysiological Correlates of Trustworthiness), they should trust the proven track record of CVSA® and save the government some prize money.

Want to learn more about this mess?  Order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO today!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Author Receives New DIA Letter as Freedom of Information Act Request Turns 19 Months Old

Three days after publishing an update about the status of a Freedom of Information Act request I submitted to officials at the Defense Intelligence Agency almost 19 months ago, I received another letter from the DIA.  In short, I was told I’ll have to keep waiting for DIA officials to come clean by providing copies of the unclassified polygraph contracts-related documents I requested.

DIA FOIA Ltr Recd 2-8-14

The image above is from a letter I received from DIA Feb. 8, 2014.

“This is an interim response to your December 16, 2013, Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Appeal request, appealing the denial of information in your FOIA request, identified as case number FOIA-0329-2012,” wrote Alesia Y. Williams, chief of the DIA’s FOIA Office staff.  “Based on your conversation with DIA’s General Counsel, we are going to treat your e-mail as the appeal.”

What Williams ignored in the opening salvo of her letter is the fact that I followed all of the steps required to appeal the outcome of my original FOIA request July 16, 2012.  Further, the December email she mentioned was sent as a follow-up to an appeal I had submitted Oct. 22, 2013.  Receipt of my appeal was acknowledged the same day by Jim Hogan, the top official at the Defense Freedom of Information Policy Office and ten days later by an official at the Office of Government Information Services at the National Archives and Records Administration.

DIA Ltr July 2012

The image above is from a letter I received from DIA early in my FOIA process.

“We will be unable to respond to your request within the FOIA’s 20 day statutory time period due to unusual circumstances,” Williams’ letter continued.  “These unusual circumstances could be:  (a) the need to search for and collect records from a facility geographically separated from this office; (b) the potential volume of records responsive to your request; and (c) the need for consultation with one or more other agencies which have substantial interest in either the determination or the subject matter of the records.  For these reasons, your request has been placed in our queue and will be worked in the order the request was received.  Our current administrative workload is in excess of 210 requests.”

Williams’ recent response was similar to the one she sent me in an interim response 10 days after I submitted my original FOIA request.  One difference, however, can be seen in her description of her office’s “current administrative workload.”  It’s down to a backlog of only 210 requests, many fewer than the 1,352 in July 26, 2012.

Since it took more than nine months to process my request was one of 1,352, I suppose it should take about six weeks to process my appeal is one of only 210 requests.  But I’m not going to hold my breath as I wait to receive the unclassified information described below as it appeared in my FOIA request:

Click image above to order.

Click image above to order.

“…copies of any and all initial and follow-up contracts (i.e., solicitations, contracts, statements of work and task orders) related to the Portable Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) or Preliminary Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) that have been awarded by any Department of Defense Agency to Lafayette Instrument Company of Lafayette, Indiana, and any other contractors, academic institutions, laboratories and subcontractors from January 1, 2000, to present.”

To find out why DIA officials — and their top boss, Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. — don’t want me to see these documents, read THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Based on the findings of my exhaustive four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, THE CLAPPER MEMO has received high praise from several individuals who appreciate its implications; among them, a retired Navy SEALs training program commander who described the scandal I share in my second nonfiction book “an unconscionable cover-up.”

Order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO, and see if you agree.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

SEE ALSO:

Coincidence or DIA Cover-Up? Timing of Response to FOIA Request Raises Questions; and

DIA Fulfillment of FOIA Request Falls Far Short of Expectations.