Sometimes, I Feel Like A Government Watchdog

Take a look at the weekly recap below, and you’ll understand why I sometimes feel like a government watchdog:

Click on image above to read article.

Click on image above to read article.

On Sunday, I watched the 14-minute segment, Manhunt: Inside the Boston Marathon Bombing Investigation, on CBS News’ 60 Minutes.  One day later, I felt compelled to ask the question, Does FBI Have More Boston Marathon Bombing Video Than They’re Willing to Share?  Read my article and see if you think my question is valid.

Later on Monday, I reported a Top Intelligence Community Lawyer Made Me Laugh.  To find out what Robert Litt, general counsel in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, said at a recent Freedom of Information Day event in the D.C. area, read the article.

Click on image above to read article.

Click on image above to read article.

In my third and final piece Monday, I shared news that proves why National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden was able to pass two polygraphs and gain access to America’s most precious secrets.  Read about it under the headline, Newspaper Reporter Reveals How He ‘Beat’ Polygraph Exam.

On Wednesday, I shared video of former Army Ranger officer Michael Behenna‘s first television interview after being paroled and released from the military prison at Fort Leavenworth.  The video appears in my piece, Michael Behenna Gives First Television Interview Since Release From Military Prison.

Click on image above to read article.

Click on image above to read article.

On Thursday, I revisited a subject more than two and a half years old under the headline, Woman Continues Fight After Losing Mother, Granddaughter.  Read it and let me know what you think my next step(s) in reporting about this case should be.

On Friday and Saturday, I’ll be spending most of my time editing the 400-plus pages of the final draft of my still-untitled first fiction novel.  I hope to have this, a “reality-based action thriller,” available for purchase early this summer and hope you’ll order a copy!

This photo shows the slightly more than 400 pages of the final draft of my first fiction thriller. Notice the red pen? I'm getting ready to put it to work.

This photo shows the slightly more than 400 pages of the final draft of my first fiction thriller. Notice the red pen? I’m getting ready to put it to work.

FYI:  If you need something to read while waiting for Book #3 to be released, order my two previous books by clicking here or on the graphic below.  Thanks in advance!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

War Against Men in the Military: Cases Bear Shocking Similarities

While reading a WRAL.com article today, I couldn’t help but notice shocking similarities between the sexual assault prosecutions of Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair and Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart, the man whose wrongful conviction is chronicled in my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August.

Click image above to read other articles in my series, "War on Men in the Military."

Click image above to read other articles in my series, “War on Men in the Military.”

One example can be found in the three paragraphs that follow an explanation of how the military judge in the case decided to prosecute despite a recommendation from the lead prosecutor that General Sinclair’s plea to a charge of adultery be accepted. The example begins in paragraph four as follows:

The defense contends that the captain, who served with Sinclair in Iraq and Afghanistan, committed perjury in a January hearing about finding text messages form Sinclair on an old cellphone, making her a poor witness on which to build a case against the general.

The captain said in the January hearing that she came across the old phone in December and charged it up to see if there was anything on it that would affect Sinclair’s court-martial. A defense forensics expert contradicted her testimony, saying she had turned the phone on several times in the months before she said she found it packed in a box.

The defense argues in the motion that the Army continues to press the case only to support a get-tough policy against sex assault in the military.

Click image above to read reviews of Three Days In August.

Click image above to read reviews of Three Days In August.

Notice the word, perjury, and how a forensics expert proved it? Apparently, perjury by a female in a military sexual assault case isn’t cause for concern.

In the case of Stewart, a highly-decorated Green Beret combat veteran, several instances of perjury surfaced during and after his court-martial.

Two that surfaced during the trial involved a German police detective and a taxi driver whose memory issues are highlighted in the article, German Police Detective Has Memory Issues Like Accuser.

One arose during the pre-sentencing phase and involved the accuser offering a strange definition of “contact.”

Yet another was brought to the court’s attention by a long-time friend of the accuser who made a post-trial statement that should have netted Stewart a new trial.

I, for one, can’t wait to read the trial transcript if or when General Sinclair’s case reaches the trial phase. Why? Because I suspect it will be as chock full of half-truths, lies and innuendo as Stewart’s trial was as the War on Men in the Military continues.

UPDATE 3/16/2014 at 8:13 p.m. Central: Sexual assault charges dropped against general after case tainted by political influence.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Intel Chief Launches Contest to Find Already-Existing Technology

Officials at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence surprised me today when they issued a news release about the launch of a contest for which they plan to award $50,000 in prize money. Why was I surprised? Because the proven credibility assessment technology allegedly being sought by DNI James R. Clapper Jr. via his gang at the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity already exists!  Details are in my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Click image above to link to ODNI news release page.

Click image above to link to ODNI news release page.

During four years of exhaustive investigation into the use of credibility assessment technologies by federal government agencies, I learned how some 2,000 local and state law enforcement agencies are currently using the technology — known as the Computer Voice Stress Analyzer® — which relies on a proprietary computer algorithm that measures microtremors in the human voice.

In addition, I interviewed military, intelligence and private security company officials about their positive experiences with CVSA® in places like Guantanamo Bay and Iraq before the technology was stripped from their control by, among other things, a memo signed by DNI Clapper.

Interestingly, I also reviewed and dissected several of the available studies — including one done by officials at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory.

By the time I finished my research, I realized what — or, more accurately, who — is keeping CVSA® from being adopted on a widespread basis throughout the federal government. It’s the polygraph loyalists (i.e., people unwilling to change horses midstream even after realizing the century-old horses they’re riding are dead).

Click image above to order book.

Click image above to order book.

It’s worth noting that I’m not the only one who believes my findings!

When Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely, a retired U.S. Army general who once served as deputy commander of U.S. Army Pacific, endorsed the book, he wrote, “Bob McCarty has uncovered a high-tech ‘turf war’ pitting those who want the best for our troops against others who seem to be focused on their own self-interests. Sadly, it seems the wrong people are winning this war. I highly recommend THE CLAPPER MEMO.”

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, a retired U.S. Navy officer who once served as commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs training program, characterized what I expose in the book as “clearly an unconscionable cover-up of a capability of the U.S. military and intelligence community to vet incoming Afghan (or any other) military personnel.”
David P. Schippers, the man who served as Congressman Henry Hyde‘s chief investigative counsel during the Clinton Impeachment Hearings in the U.S. House of Representatives, described the book as “perhaps the most thorough investigative reporting I have encountered in years. I direct the attention of the so-called major media to it. This is how it’s done!”

MaryLiz Grossetto, the aunt of LCpl. Greg Buckley Jr., a 21-year-old Marine who died in Afghanistan in August 2012 as the result of a “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attack, read the book. Afterward, she offered this review: “Read this book & you will see how our government has for many, many years deprived our military of the best possible tool for vetting & weeding out the enemy.”

Finally, Billy and Karen Vaughn shared their observations about the book almost two years after their son, U.S. Navy SEAL Aaron Carson Vaughn, lost his life along with 29 other Americans when their helicopter, call sign “Extortion 17,” was shot down in Afghanistan Aug. 6, 2011. In their endorsement, they wrote, “THE CLAPPER MEMO by Bob McCarty gives the reader an in-depth look into the dirty little secrets of politics and greed triumphing over safety and security for our fighting men and women as well as the average American citizen.”

Rather than trust an INSTINCT, the acronym for the contest that looks somewhat like a federal government bureaucrat’s job title when spelled out (i.e., Investigating Novel Statistical Techniques to Identify Neurophysiological Correlates of Trustworthiness), they should trust the proven track record of CVSA® and save the government some prize money.

Want to learn more about this mess?  Order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO today!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

DoD Spokesman Labels ‘Insider Threat’ to Troops in Afghanistan ‘As Dangerous As It Ever Was’

Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby was quoted in Stars and Stripes Friday as saying the “insider threat” against American forces in Afghanistan is “as dangerous as it ever was.” And he’s right. What he did not mention, however, is the fact that many “insider attacks” are preventable.

Click image above to read more posts about "Green-on-Blue" or "Insider" attacks.

Click image above to read more posts about “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attacks.

Admiral Kirby’s comments likely stem from the fact that he’s been kept in the dark about decisions made by senior Department of Defense officials during the past decade that have resulted in the best screening and interrogation tools available being kept out of the hands of U.S. military and intelligence officials. Out of the hands of interrogation officials in places like Afghanistan and Iraq. And, most recently, out of the vetting process used to screen recruits hoping to serve in Afghanistan’s military, police and security agencies.

Click image above to order.

Click image above to order.

In my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, I share never-before-published details about decisions made by DoD officials at the highest levels — including Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. when he was serving as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence — and about decisions that should be made in the future.

Unfortunately for good men like Spc. John A. Pelham, 22, of Portland, Ore., and Sgt. First Class Roberto C. Skelt, 41, of York, Fla., any decisions to change policy will come too late. The Army Special Forces Soldiers were killed Wednesday when, according to the aforementioned Stripes report, two individuals wearing Afghan National Army uniforms opened fire on them with machine guns. They became casualties of yet another “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider Attack.”

Click image above to read endorsements of THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Click image above to read endorsements of THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, U.S. Navy retired, came to understand the gravity of this situation after reading THE CLAPPER MEMO. In fact, the former commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs training program described what I reveal in the book as “an unconscionable cover-up.” Others have offered similar assessments.

See if you agree. Order your copy today!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Nation’s Top Intelligence Official Advised to ‘Look in the Mirror!’

Though I’d never label Edward Snowden a hero for his actions, I will offer some advice to Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. on the heels of his testimony Wednesday before members of the Senate Intelligence Committee:  “LOOK IN THE MIRROR!”

Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. delivers his opening statement to members of the Senate Intelligence Committee Jan. 29.

Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. delivers his opening statement to members of the Senate Intelligence Committee Jan. 29. CLICK TO WATCH VIDEO.

Speaking of Snowden and the damage the former National Security Agency contractor employee caused by leaking intelligence documents to which he had access, the nation’s top intelligence official said Snowden put lives of U.S. intelligence operatives at risk.  Talk about the pot calling the kettle black!

DNI Clapper did the same thing seven years ago when, as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence, he issued a memo in which he declared the polygraph the only authorized credibility assessment tool for use by Department of Defense personnel.  After all, there was — and still is — a newer, more reliable and more effective credibility assessment technology available to U.S. military and intelligence personnel.

In my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, I expose details of Clapper’s memo and the impact it has had on our nation’s defense and intelligence capabilities.  I share interviews with people who’ve had their “boots on the ground” — in places like Afghanistan, Iraq, Kuwait, Mexico and Qatar — as end users of the non-polygraph credibility assessment technology now locked out of the DoD marketplace.  In addition, I share never-before-published documents obtained from individuals who were in charge of the interrogation element at Guantanamo Bay during the early days of the so-called “Global War on Terror.”  And there’s more you’ll only find out about by reading the book!

Though it has yet to gain the kind of attention the Snowden/NSA scandal, THE CLAPPER MEMO has received glowing endorsements from several high-level individuals who appreciate its implications.  For example, a retired Navy SEALs training program commander described what I reveal inside the book as “an unconscionable cover-up.”

To learn more about what I reveal inside THE CLAPPER MEMO, you’ll have to order a copy of the book.  It’s available in paperback and ebook versions at Amazon.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

New Book Reveals How Top US Government Officials Withheld Key Information From Senators

EDITOR’S NOTE:  Slightly modified for stand-alone publication, the excerpt (below) from my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, reveals how officials inside the Departments of Defense and Justice withheld key information about interrogation technologies from members of Congress.

100707-F-3431H-016Since 2008, a number of reports have been produced by a variety of governmental and nongovernmental entities.  While some focused on the situation involving detainees at the Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility (a.k.a., “GITMO”) in Cuba, others looked at the progress — or lack thereof — being made in the war in Afghanistan. From among the reports available, three warrant special attention.

Amidst media-flamed fires of concern regarding allegations GITMO detainees were being mistreated, members of the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee took steps in 2008 to make themselves appear proactive as the war approached its seven-year mark.

TCM Graphic 2-17-13In addition to holding hearings, they deployed a team of investigators to look into allegations of torture being inflicted upon detainees at GITMO and at other detention facilities in Iraq (i.e., Abu Ghraib, Camp Cropper and Camp Bucca).  The investigation resulted in the publication of an unclassified 263-page report, “INQUIRY INTO THE TREATMENT OF DETAINEES IN U.S. CUSTODY,” dated November 20, 2008.

Over the course of their investigation, according to the report, the committee reviewed more than 200,000 pages of classified and unclassified documents, including detention and interrogation policies, memoranda, electronic communications, training manuals and the results of previous investigations into detainee abuse.  While the majority of those documents were provided to the committee by the Department of Defense, the committee also reviewed documents provided by the Department of Justice, documents in the public domain, a small number of documents provided by individuals and a number of published secondary sources including books and articles in popular magazines and scholarly journals.

PapersIn addition, according to the report, the committee interviewed more than 70 individuals in connection with its inquiry.  Most were current or former DoD employees, and some came from the current and former ranks of DoJ, including the FBI.

The committee issued subpoenas, heard testimony from subpoenaed witnesses, sent written questions to more than 200 individuals, and held public hearings June 17 and September 25, 2008.

Though one might have expected to see several mentions of it, since it is the only approved credibility-assessment tool for use within DoD, the SASC report included only one mention of the word, polygraph.  It appeared in a heavily-redacted paragraph in which interrogators and analysts were said to have attributed the cooperation of one detainee, Mohammed al-Khatani, to several factors, one of which was “his failing a polygraph test.”

Only one detainee cooperated.

The report also included mentions of interrogation techniques that were part of the curriculum at U.S. Military Survival Evasion Resistance and Escape schools and other non-polygraph interrogation techniques that had been authorized by U.S. Joint Forces Command for use during the interrogation of detainees in U.S. military custody by members of a Joint Personnel Recovery Agency team deployed to Iraq in September 2003.

Saddam_Hussein_LRMost remarkable about the committee’s findings, however, were the things not mentioned.

The committee’s report failed to mention a non-polygraph technology that had been used successfully to interrogate detainees at GITMO, to interrogate members of Saddam Hussein’s inner circle (a.k.a., “The Deck of Cards”) in Iraq, and to interrogate a diverse range of subjects at locations around the world.

Likewise, it failed to include a single mention of that non-polygraph technology or anyone remotely related to it.

As a result of the omissions, the polygraph’s leading challenger would remain unknown to anyone relying solely upon the SASC investigators’ report for information upon which to make critical decisions.

To learn about the two other reports and about the non-polygraph technology senior DoD officials continue to keep out of the hands of those who interrogate terror and criminal suspects and out of the hands of our fighting men and women on the front lines of war, order a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO.

The 268-page product of an exhaustive four-year investigation, THE CLAPPER MEMO is available in paperback and ebook versions.  Order your copy today!

FYI:  THE CLAPPER MEMO has received several notable endorsements.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

U.S. Supreme Court Rejects Oklahoma Army Officer’s Appeal

A crucial milestone in the military’s case against Army Ranger 1st Lt. Michael Behenna passed today as the U.S. Supreme Court announced justices rejected the appeal filed on behalf of the Edmond, Okla., native who was convicted in 2009 of unpremeditated murder after he shot and killed Ali Mansur, a known al-Qaeda operative, in what he said was self-defense near Baghdad May 16, 2008.

Clockwise from upper left:  Michael's family; Michael; Michael as a youngster; and Michael and his girlfriend, Shannon.

Clockwise from upper left: Michael’s family; Michael; Michael as a youngster; and Michael and his girlfriend, Shannon.

Though I’ve written more than 60 articles about the lieutenant’s case since June 4, 2009, I share links to a handful of the most important ones below:

Army 15-6 Investigation Report Proves Elusive (Jan. 15, 2013);

• Is Army Protecting Someone in Officer’s Chain of Command? (Aug. 20, 2012);

• American Warfighters Deserve Same Consideration as Taliban (July 17, 2012); and

Photos Show Scene Where Trail of Injustice Began (Feb. 10, 2010).

With almost 11 years remaining on his sentence, it remains unclear as to how many of those years he must serve before being given the opportunity for parole.  Until then, I hope you will write to him at the address below to show your support:

Michael Behenna #87503
1300 N. Warehouse Road
Fort Leavenworth, KS  66027-2304

FYI: Behenna and Kelly Stewart, the man whose life is chronicled in my book, Three Days In August, were good friends while both were behind bars at Fort Leavenworth.

Order Books Graphic LR 6-15-13

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.