DIA Continues to Stonewall Freedom of Information Act Request — 639 Days (So Far)

Unless something unexpected happens during the next two days, a Freedom of Information Act request I submitted to the Defense Intelligence Agency will turn 639 days old Wednesday, and a citizen’s access to unclassified details about government purchases of polygraph machines will continue to be squelched.

James R. Clapper Jr.

James R. Clapper Jr.

I don’t expect a response sooner than Friday since DIA officials will be in Tampa until Thursday, attending GEOINT, the nation’s largest intelligence gathering that was originally set to take place six months ago but was postponed due to the government shutdown. Truth be told, I don’t anticipate a response at all after almost two years of waiting. DIA officials don’t want to make their top boss, Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., look any worse than he already does after lying to Congress and allowing things like the Edward Snowden scandal to occur on his watch. But I can dream, can’t I?

What unclassified information do I want so badly that DIA officials do not want me to have? It’s described below as it appeared in my FOIA request July 16, 2012:

“…copies of any and all initial and follow-up contracts (i.e., solicitations, contracts, statements of work and task orders) related to the Portable Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) or Preliminary Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) that have been awarded by any Department of Defense agency to Lafayette Instrument Company of Lafayette, Indiana, and any other contractors, academic institutions, laboratories and subcontractors from January 1, 2000, to present.”

Don’t get me wrong. DIA officials did respond to my initial request. In a piece May 24, 2013, I described how their response fell far short of expectations by providing only 12 pages of documentation dating back only as far as June 25, 2010 — not Jan. 1, 2000, as requested — and how, coincidentally or not, the agency’s response arrived one week after the release of my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, for which I was seeking the information. In addition, I highlighted a portion (below) of the appeal letter I mailed the same day:

PolygraphIn responding to my request, you included only 12 pages of documentation dating back as far as June 25, 2010. That, by any stretch of the imagination, is UNSATISFACTORY; therefore, I must contest the $155.80 assessment for “professional search and review time of 3.5 hours at $44.00 per hour, reproduction and release costs of 12 pages at 15¢ per page.” Until such time as a genuine effort is made on behalf of your agency to provide the requested documentation, I shall not remit payment as requested.

In a letter dated Feb. 28 and received March 3, DIA Chief of Congressional Relations James L. Kaplan even had the nerve to stonewall my Congressional representative, U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner.

While I could wax poetic about my frustration related to this stonewalling, I won’t. Instead, I’ll point you to my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, and recommend you read it if you truly want to understand why I’m so interested in the documents being withheld from me and why so many high-profile people have endorsed my book.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Author Needs Honest Answers From Speakers at Nation’s Largest Intelligence Gathering

Originally scheduled to take place six months ago but postponed due to the government shutdown, GEOINT 2013* Symposium is now set for April 14-17 in Tampa, Fla.  Touted as the largest intelligence event in the U.S., according to a news release issued by the United States Geospatial Intelligence Foundation, this event stands as a target-rich environment for someone like me who needs some honest answers from a handful of the event’s keynote speakers.

GeoInt_2013Atop the list of speakers from whom I’d like answers is Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., the man whose name appears in the title of my second and most-recent nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.  I’d like to ask DNI Clapper why, as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence seven years ago, he issued a memo declaring the polygraph the only authorized credibility assessment tool for use by Department of Defense personnel when a newer, more reliable and more effective credibility assessment technology was — and still is — available to U.S. military and intelligence personnel.

Second on my list is Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael T. Flynn. I’d like to ask the Army three-star general why I’ve had to wait 632 days (so far) for DIA officials to fulfill my Freedom of Information Act request for unclassified information related to DoD purchases of portable polygraph equipment during the past 12 years.  Specifically, I asked for the following information in my request July 16, 2012:

“…copies of any and all initial and follow-up contracts (i.e., solicitations, contracts, statements of work and task orders) related to the Portable Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) or Preliminary Credibility Assessment Screening System (PCASS) that have been awarded by any Department of Defense Agency to Lafayette Instrument Company of Lafayette, Indiana, and any other contractors, academic institutions, laboratories and subcontractors from January 1, 2000, to present.”

Unfortunately, DIA’s only fulfillment to date, a mail parcel that I received May 9, 2013, fell far short of expectations.  It contained only 12 pages of documentation dating back only as far as June 25, 2010 — not to Jan. 1, 2000, as requested.  Coincidentally, the date that appeared atop the letter, May 2, 2013, was the exact day THE CLAPPER MEMO, the book for which I was seeking the information, was released.  Coincidence?  I think not.

Of course, there are others on the list of keynoters with whom I’d like to speak.

I’d like to ask three flag officers — Gen. Lloyd J. Austin III, commander of U.S. Central Command, Adm. William H. McRaven, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, and Lt. Gen. Raymond P. Palumbo, Director for Defense Intelligence for Warfighter Support in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence how they can look in the mirror each day while knowing a tool proven more effective and reliable than the century-old polygraph is being kept out of the hands of their front-line warriors.

U.S. Rep. C.A. "Dutch" Ruppersberger (D-Md)

U.S. Rep. C.A. “Dutch” Ruppersberger (D-Md)

Finally, I’d like to ask Maryland Congressman C.A. “Dutch” Ruppersberger why he, as Ranking Member of the U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, hasn’t shown more interest in this topic.  He was, after all, among the several dozen members of Congress who received copies of my book in which I point fingers and name names.

Based on the findings of my exhaustive four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of so-called credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, THE CLAPPER MEMO has received rave reviews from people who know what it’s like to have a “dog in the fight.”

To learn more about the book, visit http://TheClapperMemo.com.  To order a copy, click here or on the graphic below.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Sometimes, I Feel Like A Government Watchdog

Take a look at the weekly recap below, and you’ll understand why I sometimes feel like a government watchdog:

Click on image above to read article.

Click on image above to read article.

On Sunday, I watched the 14-minute segment, Manhunt: Inside the Boston Marathon Bombing Investigation, on CBS News’ 60 Minutes.  One day later, I felt compelled to ask the question, Does FBI Have More Boston Marathon Bombing Video Than They’re Willing to Share?  Read my article and see if you think my question is valid.

Later on Monday, I reported a Top Intelligence Community Lawyer Made Me Laugh.  To find out what Robert Litt, general counsel in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, said at a recent Freedom of Information Day event in the D.C. area, read the article.

Click on image above to read article.

Click on image above to read article.

In my third and final piece Monday, I shared news that proves why National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden was able to pass two polygraphs and gain access to America’s most precious secrets.  Read about it under the headline, Newspaper Reporter Reveals How He ‘Beat’ Polygraph Exam.

On Wednesday, I shared video of former Army Ranger officer Michael Behenna‘s first television interview after being paroled and released from the military prison at Fort Leavenworth.  The video appears in my piece, Michael Behenna Gives First Television Interview Since Release From Military Prison.

Click on image above to read article.

Click on image above to read article.

On Thursday, I revisited a subject more than two and a half years old under the headline, Woman Continues Fight After Losing Mother, Granddaughter.  Read it and let me know what you think my next step(s) in reporting about this case should be.

On Friday and Saturday, I’ll be spending most of my time editing the 400-plus pages of the final draft of my still-untitled first fiction novel.  I hope to have this, a “reality-based action thriller,” available for purchase early this summer and hope you’ll order a copy!

This photo shows the slightly more than 400 pages of the final draft of my first fiction thriller. Notice the red pen? I'm getting ready to put it to work.

This photo shows the slightly more than 400 pages of the final draft of my first fiction thriller. Notice the red pen? I’m getting ready to put it to work.

FYI:  If you need something to read while waiting for Book #3 to be released, order my two previous books by clicking here or on the graphic below.  Thanks in advance!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Top Intelligence Community Lawyer Made Me Laugh

I laughed today after reading a Secrecy News post in which appeared the following words, said to have been spoken five days ago by Robert Litt, general counsel in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence:

Robert Litt, ODNI General Counsel

Robert Litt, ODNI General Counsel

“There is no question that overclassification of information is a genuine problem.”

I found Litt’s words especially humorous in light of the fact that (1) he uttered them at a Freedom of Information Day program at American University Washington College of Law and (2) I’ve waited 616 days, so far, for officials at the Defense Intelligence Agency to fulfill my Freedom of Information Act request for copies of unclassified contract documents related to Pentagon polygraph equipment purchases dating back to Jan. 1, 2000, and continuing through July 16, 2012, the day I filed the FOIA request.

I understand Litt doesn’t work for DIA, but the three-letter intelligence agency is one of 17 such agencies that full under the purview of Litt’s boss, Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr.; therefore, I have to believe Litt and Clapper might wield some influence over DIA officials who have turned FOIA stonewalling into something of an art form.

DNI James R. Clapper Jr.

DNI James R. Clapper Jr.

In related news, officials at George Washington University’s National Security Archive named DNI Clapper the 2013 recipient of the Rosemary Award. Named for President Richard M. Nixon’s secretary, Rose Mary Woods, whose spectacular stretch allegedly erased 18 1/2 minutes of a Watergate tape, the (dis)honor recognizes the worst open-government performance by a government officials.

If you’re curious as to why DIA officials might not want to fulfill my FOIA request, you’ll be able to hazard a pretty good guess after reading my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

To learn more about it, visit http://TheClapperMemo.com. To order a copy of the book, click here or on the graphic below.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

REPORT: Four More GITMO Detainees Returned to Terror

In a new semi-annual report, “Re-Engagement of Detainees Formerly Held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,” released Wednesday, Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. reveals that four more former GITMO detainees returned to terrorism/insurgent activities and 74 others are suspected to have done so.

Click image above to download the latest ODNI report.

Click image above to download the latest ODNI report.

The new DNI report bumps up to 29 percent the number of GITMO detainees returning to terrorism, up from 28 percent six months ago.

Click image above to order book.

Click image above to order book.

The “silver lining” in this report can be found in the fact that three of the four detainees confirmed as having reengaged are no longer among the living.

In my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, I share details about GITMO detainees obtained from the high-ranking interrogation officials who interrogated them there. Most importantly, I share how they describe the damage done to national security by a Pentagon decision to strip GITMO interrogators of their most-effective tool for learning about detainees’ past exploits and future plans. And, of course, DNI Clapper plays a key role in this story one retired Navy SEALs training program commander called “an unconscionable cover-up.”Learn more by ordering a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO, a book which has received a number of high-profile endorsements.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Author Not Surprised to Hear Retired General Say Muslim Brotherhood Inside Pentagon

When I heard retired Army Lt. Gen. Jerry Boykin telling an interviewer in the video below that he knows our government — including the Pentagon! — has been infiltrated at the highest levels by members of the radical Muslim Brotherhood, I wasn’t the least bit surprised. Why? I’ll explain after you watch the video below.

I wasn’t surprised, because I spent four years conducting an exhaustive investigation of the credibility assessment tools relied upon by federal government agencies and members of the contractor community as they screen individuals for employment, conduct background investigations and interrogate individuals suspected of criminal, terrorist and/or treasonous activities.

Along the way, I uncovered three separate memos — one of which was issued by then-Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., who now serves as Director of National Intelligence — via which senior Department of Defense officials informed all DoD personnel that the century-old polygraph was the only credibility assessment technology authorized for their use.

I also revealed the existence of a “turf war” that’s been raging silently for more than 40 years between polygraph loyalists unwilling to embrace a newer, more-reliable technology that’s already been embraced by more than 1,900 local and state law enforcement agencies nationwide.

General Boykin’s claims begin to make sense when one takes into consideration how well the polygraph has performed in several key areas:

• Despite what International Security Assistance Force officials once posted and later removed from the ISAF Facebook page, the portable polygraph deployed to Afghanistan certainly hasn’t improved the vetting process used to screen Afghan recruits or prevented record numbers of “Green-on-Blue” Attacks during the past five years.

• Periodic polygraph exams should have helped prevent the unauthorized disclosure of millions of classified and/or sensitive documents by people like Edward Snowden. Instead, he was able to pass the very polygraph exams that were supposed to have caught him.

• During the early days of the so-called “Global War on Terror,” officials at Guantanamo Bay found themselves unable to count on support from polygraph loyalists when it came time to interrogate detainees. And when they turned to a non-polygraph technology and began to realize extraordinary results, DoD officials removed the non-polygraph tool from their arsenal!

The general’s claim also makes sense when one considers that a Freedom of Information Act request, via which I seek to obtain copies of unclassified documents related to DoD contracts for purchases of polygraph equipment, is about to turn 20 months old.

Click image above to order.

Click image above to order.

It’s worth noting that I’m not the only one who believes what I share on this topic in my second nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely, a retired U.S. Army general who once served as deputy commander of U.S. Army Pacific, endorsed the book, wrote, “Bob McCarty has uncovered a high-tech ‘turf war’ pitting those who want the best for our troops against others who seem to be focused on their own self-interests. Sadly, it seems the wrong people are winning this war. I highly recommend THE CLAPPER MEMO.”

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, a retired U.S. Navy officer who once served as commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs training program, characterized what I expose in the book as “clearly an unconscionable cover-up of a capability of the U.S. military and intelligence community to vet incoming Afghan (or any other) military personnel.”

David P. Schippers, the man who served as Congressman Henry Hyde‘s chief investigative counsel during the Clinton Impeachment Hearings in the U.S. House of Representatives, described the book as “perhaps the most thorough investigative reporting I have encountered in years. I direct the attention of the so-called major media to it. This is how it’s done!”

Gold Star family members have praised the book, too.

MaryLiz Grossetto, the aunt of LCpl. Greg Buckley Jr., a 21-year-old Marine who died in Afghanistan in August 2012 as the result of a “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attack, read the book. Afterward, she offered this review: “Read this book & you will see how our government has for many, many years deprived our military of the best possible tool for vetting & weeding out the enemy.”

Billy and Karen Vaughn shared their observations about the book almost two years after their son, U.S. Navy SEAL Aaron Carson Vaughn, lost his life along with 29 other Americans when their helicopter, call sign “Extortion 17,” was shot down in Afghanistan Aug. 6, 2011. In their endorsement, they wrote, “THE CLAPPER MEMO by Bob McCarty gives the reader an in-depth look into the dirty little secrets of politics and greed triumphing over safety and security for our fighting men and women as well as the average American citizen.”

I hope you’ll take the opportunity to read the book, too!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Counterintelligence Expert: One-Size-Fits-All Approach Harms National Security

After reading a report issued Feb. 11 by the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, I contacted a retired counterintelligence operative with whom I’ve been friends for several years and asked him to offer feedback about the report that had been released almost five months after Aaron Alexis murdered 12 people and injured four others at the DC Navy Yard.  He agreed.

House COGR DC Navy Yard ReportThough he spoke on condition of anonymity due to the nature of his past and present work, his observations about the SLIPPING THROUGH THE CRACKS report deserve your attention.

“It just goes to show the Feds continue to use antiquated policies and procedures for vetting U.S. persons who require security clearances,” he said, noting that federal government agencies are using the same security policies and procedures that have been used as “templates” in Iraq and Afghanistan and produced high levels of infiltration by individuals hostile toward U.S. personnel.  For more details, read my articles about “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attacks in Afghanistan.

Click to read my articles about "Green-on-Blue" or "Insider" attacks in Afghanistan.

Click to read my articles about “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attacks in Afghanistan.

Knowing I had authored THE CLAPPER MEMO, a book about a long-fought “turf war” between polygraph loyalists and all challengers to their century-old technology, he told me one could show a nexus between flawed policies and procedures and the broken polygraph program currently embraced by the federal government.

“Clearly, the old timers such as (Director of National Intelligence James R.) Clapper have not kept up with the advances that have taken place both with technology and with vetting procedures,” he explained.  “Even most major police departments and many smaller police departments conduct a more thorough investigation and have a more thorough vetting process than the federal government agencies.”

Part of the blame lies with following a one-size-fits-all approach and catering to the common denominator.

“Things were better when each agency was required to vet and investigate its own people.  Now you have the entire process contracted out, and the people doing the investigations are being paid by their production (i.e.., the number of cases/leads they complete) instead of by the quality of their investigations.”  For more details, read my articles about Edward Snowden.

Click image above to read article.

Click image above to read article.

“The federal government should study the ‘best practices’ of local police departments when it comes to screening, vetting and investigating employees,” he explained after noting that more U.S. police agencies use non-polygraph technologies than polygraph and “may learn some valuable lessons” by doing so.

Then he shared an example of how the current misguided approach trickles into other federal government programs.

“What does it say about how serious they really are when they are hiring known criminals as (ObamaCare) health care navigators because of a policy that requires no background checks?   This is just another ‘eye wash’ report that will do nothing to fix the broken system that is in place.

“They could easily fix it if they wanted to,” he concluded, “but the federal behemoth will continue doing business as usual — as they have demonstrated with the polygraph.”

Wise words from someone with decades of experience in the world of counterintelligence.

To learn more about the turf war mentioned above, ORDER A COPY of THE CLAPPER MEMO.

FOR WHAT IT’S WORTH:  The same committee that produced the report mentioned above is set to hold a hearing Thursday at 10 a.m. Eastern to discuss the deaths of 30 Americans, including 17 members of the U.S. Navy’s SEAL TEAM SIX, aboard a single helicopter in Afghanistan Aug. 6, 2011.  For more details, read my articles about “EXTORTION 17.”

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.