Tag Archives: James R Clapper

Dr. Ben Carson Raises Good Question About Syrian Refugees

I’m not ready to cast my vote for Dr. Ben Carson, but I applaud the Republican presidential candidate. On Monday night, the retired neurosurgeon from Maryland raised the same question I raised earlier the same day — How Will We Screen Out Terrorists Among Syrian Refugees?

Raised during an interview with CNN’s John Berman Monday, Dr. Carson’s concerns came, much like mine did, less than 48 hours after President Barack Obama announced the United States will welcome 10,000 Syrian refugees for resettlement over the next 12 months. Now, I’m left wondering if he read the article I published yesterday. But I digress. UPDATE 9/16/2015 at 4:01 p.m. Central: It turns out that the president is going to allow 10,000 more than originally planned. For details, see this Bloomberg report published today.

If you have a close or direct connection to Dr. Carson’s campaign team, please let me know. I’d love to send him a copy of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, or meet with members of his team to bring them up to date on the proven vetting technology discussed in the book.

The technology discussed in The Clapper Memo was proven highly accurate and effective in places like Afghanistan, Guantanamo Bay and Iraq before it was unceremoniously banned by the powers that be inside the Department of Defense, including James R. Clapper Jr., the man now serving as director of National Intelligence. It’s now being used by more state and local law enforcement agencies than any other, including polygraph. And it should must be used on every prospective refugee trying to enter the country, regardless of their country of origin.

Hope to hear from someone in the Carson Camp soon!

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

How Will We Screen Out Terrorists Among Syrian Refugees?

Over the weekend, President Barack Obama announced the United States will welcome 10,000 Syrian refugees for resettlement over the next 12 months. Now, sane Americans must wonder how government officials will screen out terrorists among the refugees entering the country through refugee processing centers in almost every state.

This U.S. Department of State map shows where refugees, including those from Syria, will be sent.

This U.S. Department of State map shows where refugees, including those from Syria, will be sent.

The transcript of a State Department background briefing for reporters Sept. 9 offers some clues about how those ostensibly in charge of the nation’s foreign affairs programs — including Secretary of State John “F’n” Kerry and other left-wing political appointees — plan to ensure no members of the Islamic State and other Islamic terror groups enter the United States under the guise of being refugees. Michael Gordon of The New York Times asked the first question:

“Could you tell us, please, what the range of numbers is? You say you want to – the Secretary wants to increase the number of refugees that are admitted, so what is the range you’re looking at and what does that cost? And then it seems that part of the problem is vetting, in that the UN has submitted a list but it takes a long time to vet these people. Are you looking at committing more resources to speed up that vetting process? Thank you.”

As someone who spent four years investigating the federal government’s use of so-called credibility assessment technologies in places like Afghanistan, Guantanamo Bay and Iraq, I’m more aware than most of the capabilities that exist within our defense and intelligence agencies for conducting background checks and vetting (a.k.a., “screening”) foreign nationals. That awareness makes me more than a bit interested in the response of an unidentified “senior State Department official” to Gordon’s question. It appears below with acronyms deciphered by yours truly:

“The Secretary talked about a range of different numbers, but I will not be sharing them with you today. And there was varying views within the group from the judiciary committees of the House and Senate about how receptive they were to increasing the numbers of refugees coming.

“And the process to bring refugees here is careful and deliberate, and that’s – as a result, it takes a while. It takes between 18 to 24 months between when a refugee is referred to us and when they – if approved, when they end up arriving in the United States. And a big reason for this is the care that’s put into the security vetting for them. It involves several aspects. Part of it is that every refugee has their sort of case file put together with help from organizations that we fund overseas, and then those files and the refugees’ families themselves are interviewed by someone from the Department of Homeland Security, from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. And then we also check their names against a whole series of U.S. Government databases to make sure that they’re not already in there – some sort of derogatory information about them.

“What we’re trying to do is weed out people who are liars, who are criminals, or would-be terrorists. And this is something that slows down the process and it’s taken very seriously by everyone involved in it.”

The response, especially the description of the security vetting process having “several aspects” and being “careful and deliberate,” reminds me of what I was told repeatedly over a period of several months in 2012 by U.S. military public affairs officers speaking on behalf of the now-defunct International Security Assistance Force, precursor to the Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan. An excerpt from a July 12, 2012, statement appears below:

“We (ISAF) have today, just as we discussed back in April, advise the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) in assisting them to develop improvements to the overall vetting and recruitment process for the ANSF. The 8-step vetting process, which we have discussed in the past, is the result of our advising on this issue. Just like everything else that we (ISAF) advise on in Afghanistan, it is an ongoing and continuous process. We continually advise our Afghan partners on ways to improve processes. Again, the Afghans have the lead and are responsible for vetting their recruits into their security forces.”

Two months after receiving the statement above via email, I learned Afghans had not been in charge of all of the vetting taking place in that country. Instead, U.S. Army personnel were doing much of the vetting and, by September 2012, had grown “increasingly frustrated” with the eight-step vetting process that turned out to be largely ineffective at stopping so-called “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attacks, the often-deadly surprise attacks waged against U.S. and coalition forces by allegedly-trustworthy Afghans wearing the uniforms of Afghan military, police or security agencies.

And therein lies the problem with vetting 10,000 Syrian refugees, a group Nicholas Rasmussen, director of the National Counterterrorism Center, described as “clearly a population of concern” during a meeting of the House Committee on Homeland Security last week. [UPDATE at 7:55 p.m. Central: UK Prime Minister David Cameron has been warned that two out of every 100 Syrian refugees are Islamic State fighters.]

If federal government officials are not willing to subject Syrian refugees to the same highly-effective interrogation technology that was used to interrogate members of Saddam Hussein’s inner circle (a.k.a., “The Deck of Cards”) as well as hundreds of al-Qaeda and Taliban terrorists and other detainees at Guantanamo Bay and elsewhere around the world, then we might as well plan to see a significant increase in the number of terror attacks waged on U.S. soil.

At a bare minimum, we will likely see more cities experience the types of refugee problems the folks in Minneapolis are facing.

Click on image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo by Bob McCarty.

Click on image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo by Bob McCarty.

To learn more about the no-touch, no-torture, no-pain non-polygraph interrogation technology that was used with great success before its use by Department of Defense personnel was banned in October 2007 by James R. Clapper Jr., then Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence and now Director of National Intelligence (i.e., nation’s top intelligence official), visit TheClapperMemo.com. There, you’ll find an overview of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, as well as several stellar endorsements the book has received. FYI: You’ll also be able to order a copy of the book!

h/t Zero Hedge

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Fictional Superheroes: Wonder Woman, Polygraph Machine

An article about Jill Lepore’s recently-released book, The Secret History of Wonder Woman, caught my attention today for two reasons: first, I was a teenage boy when the “Wonder Woman” television series launched; and, second, I developed more than a passing interest in a technology, still in use today, that was developed by the same man who created the fictional superhero.

Click image above to order book.

Click image above to order book.

Again, why did it catch my attention? Because it mentions the fact that the creator of the Wonder Woman character is none other than William Moulton Marston, the same man credited with developing the now-century-old polygraph machine.

One paragraph in the article, in particular, caught my eye:

Coincidentally I was reading a book called Born Liars: Why We Can’t Live Without Deceit when this hefty tome rocked up, and was just embarking on the section about Marston himself. Describing him as ‘irrepressibly optimistic’, it goes on to claim that the lie detector, or ‘polygraph machine’ as it was more pompously known, was so useless that in 1986 when Aldrich Ames, a CIA operative spying for the USSR, informed his paymasters that the government intended to give him a routine polygraph test, they simply advised him to get a good night’s sleep and relax. He did so and passed — and passed again, in 1991, when the CIA were carrying out a search for an internal mole (i.e. Ames himself).

Writer Julie Burchill’s explanation above of how the polygraph was a colossal failure, especially when it comes to catching people like notorious CIA spy Aldrich Ames, jives with what I shared in both a previous article and in my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, which is based upon four years of exhaustive investigative work. Her mention of Marston’s name in the next paragraph, along with the phrase, “snake-oil salesman,” surely made me laugh.

Despite facts like the one involving Aldrich, the Department of Defense continues to rely on the polygraph as its only credibility assessment technology authorized for use by its employees. Why? Because, as I explained in a piece three days ago, people like Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. worked hard — and went against the advice and counsel of military and intelligence experts on the ground — to ban the use of a more-reliable and more-effective credibility assessment technology.

To learn more about this non-polygraph technology, order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

To learn what others think about the book, read some of the high-profile endorsements it has received.

If you like this article and my other efforts, please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

YOU Might Be On A Federal Watch List!

Fifteen months after news broke about federal investigators targeting people engaged in the cottage industry of teaching others how to pass polygraph exams, I suspect many who purchased my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, might be on a federal watch list.

Polygraph Exam

Why? Because, according to a report Nov. 14, 2013, officials with multiple federal government agencies confirmed to McClatchy News reporter Marisa Taylor that they had collected and shared the personal information of thousands of Americans in an attempt to root out untrustworthy federal workers.  Specifically, those officials confirmed that people who had no direct ties to the U.S. government and had simply purchased certain books — about polygraph-beating techniques — had been scrutinized.

Perhaps most disturbing is that the government agencies contacted by Taylor said they plan to retain the list of people who purchased the aforementioned books in case any of those on the list take polygraphs for federal jobs or criminal investigations in the future.

Again, I suspect most people who purchased The Clapper Memo, a book in which a person can read about many countermeasures available to defeat the polygraph, have no such direct ties and, therefore, meet the description above.

If you’re tempted to believe it makes sense for government officials to build lists of people based on their book-purchasing habits — for future reference, of course — then I implore you to look deeper into the subject matter by reading The Clapper Memo. The product of an exhaustive four-year investigation into the government’s use of credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, the book will open your eyes to troubling decisions made by federal government officials — including Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., the man now serving as our nation’s top intelligence official — that have far-reaching and extremely-dangerous implications for the American people.

Many influential people who read The Clapper Memo were stunned at what they learned.

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, U.S. Navy (Ret.), a former commander of the U.S. Navy’s Basic Underwater Demolition/SEALs (BUD/S) Training Program, believes I have revealed “An unconscionable cover-up.”

Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely, U.S. Army (Ret.), former deputy commander, U.S. Army Pacific, said, “Bob McCarty has uncovered a high-tech ‘turf war’ pitting those who want the best for our troops against others who seem to be focused on their own self-interests.  Sadly, it seems the wrong people are winning this war.  I highly recommend The Clapper Memo.”

David P. Schippers, U.S. House of Representatives chief investigative counsel during the impeachment of President Bill Clinton, said, “Bob McCarty’s book, The Clapper Memo, represents perhaps the most thorough investigative reporting I have encountered in years.  I direct the attention of the so-called major media to it.  This is how it’s done!”

Others have spoken favorably of the book as well. Click here for details.

For a complete understanding of what I uncovered, order a copy of The Clapper Memo today.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

DoD Ban on Non-Polygraph Technology Continues

Almost 28 months ago, I came across a Military.com article about the Army telling Soldiers they could use only government-issued magazines with their M4 carbines.  In essence, they were told they could no longer — without violating orders, that is — use the widely-popular PMAG polymer M4 magazine manufactured by Magpul Industries Corp. Barely one month later, the ban was rescinded, according to this article, because it didn’t make sense. Now, it’s time to rescind another Defense Department ban on technology that doesn’t make sense.

I Company, 3rd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment live fire exercise 'Iron Anvil.' U.S. Army photo

I Company, 3rd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment live fire exercise ‘Iron Anvil.’ U.S. Army photo

In 2004, then-Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence Stephen Cambone declared the polygraph the only credibility assessment tool authorized for use by DoD personnel, but it didn’t take.  They kept using one they liked, because it worked.

In 2007, then-Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. issued a nearly-identical order, and it was largely ignored.

Only after a third ban was issued — this one by Admiral Eric T. Olson, then-commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, in 2008 — were all challengers to the polygraph finally cast adrift.

Why did it take DoD leaders three tries to make warfighters stop using their preferred non-polygraph credibility assessment technology? Because those warfighters refused to give up a tool they knew worked best — in places like Baghdad and Guantanamo Bay.

Want to learn more about the non-polygraph technology warfighters refused to stop using?  Details about it appear in my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo.

To learn more about the book and read some of the endorsements it has received, click here. To order a copy, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.