Does FBI Have More Boston Marathon Bombing Video Than They’re Willing to Share?

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As I watched the 14-minute segment, Manhunt: Inside the Boston Marathon Bombing Investigation, on 60 Minutes on CBS yesterday, I noticed FBI officials seemed more than willing to share imagery recorded by security cameras along the route and near the finish line of the world-famous foot race.  At the same time, I couldn’t help but wonder if they are keeping a lid on other video footage that might tell a different story about the attack that killed three and injured more than 250 others.  After all, they’ve done it before.

Unbeknownst to many Americans, including those who did not read my Sept. 9 post, a new trial to determine the fate of video footage recorded by security cameras in downtown Oklahoma City prior to 9:02 a.m. April 19, 1995, is set to begin July 28 in federal court in Salt Lake City after originally being scheduled May 5.  Why a trial?  Because FBI officials refuse to hand over that footage, and Judge Clark Waddoups seems to have a problem with that.

The plaintiff in the case, Salt Lake City attorney Jesse Trentadue, hopes the trial will resolve his long-running legal battle with the FBI over the videotape footage he believes will help him unravel the mystery surrounding the death of his brother, Kenneth Trentadue, while also shedding light on the identity of the man referred to as “John Doe #2″ during the chaotic days following the bombing.

Untold Stories of the OKC BombingAs I’ve reported numerous times during the past five years in my series, Untold Stories of the Oklahoma City Bombing, Kenneth Trentadue died under suspicious circumstances while in custody at the U.S. Bureau of Prisons Federal Transfer Center in Oklahoma City several months after the horrific events unfurled in in downtown Oklahoma City.

Via the Freedom of Information Act, Jesse Trentadue has spent most of the past five years trying to obtain copies of the videotape images captured by more than 20 surveillance cameras operating in the vicinity of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City prior to the detonation of the truck bomb that killed 268 168 people.

While the FBI did produce tapes from the buildings around the Murrah Building, the tapes had been edited, Trentadue said.  As for the tapes from the cameras on the Murrah Building, the contents of which are described in a timeline prepared by the Secret Service, the FBI does not dispute that the existence of the unedited versions of the surveillance tapes recorded prior to the blast; instead, they say they cannot find them.  In addition, FBI officials have refused to provided the one-time star athlete at the University of Southern California with a copy of the original videotape showing the arrest of Timothy McVeigh as recorded on the dashboard camera of Oklahoma Highway Patrol Trooper Charles Hanger’s vehicle the day of the bombing.

Call me skeptical, but I’m hesitant to believe FBI officials will share everything they should with the American public after the trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the lone remaining suspect in the Boston Marathon Bombing.  I hope they prove me wrong.

To learn more about Trentadue’s legal battle, I recommend you watch the video above.  In addition, I suggest you read my piece, Truth Remains Elusive 18 Years After Oklahoma City Bombing and other articles in my series about the OKC BombingAnd, of course, thanks in advance for sharing this article!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

FBI’s ‘Sensitive Informant Program’ Back in the News

Nine months after Jesse Trentadue filed a motion aimed at convincing a federal judge in Utah to allow him access to information about the FBI’s “Sensitive Information Program,” FBI officials provided the Salt Lake City attorney with what he described as “another dump of documents.”

Trentadue Motion for Limited Disc 2-27-13

Click to download motion filed 2-27-13.

Via email this afternoon, Trentadue said the documents he received were declassified a little more than a month ago and reveal the FBI has a sophisticated program to recruit sensitive informants and its agents are going to withhold as much information as possible about that program.

Once Trentadue obtains more details about the “Sensitive Informant Program,” he hopes those details will help him learn more about the brutal death of his brother, Kenneth Trentadue, under suspicious circumstances while in custody at the U.S. Bureau of Prisons Federal Transfer Center in Oklahoma City in 1995 and about the connection he believes exists between his brother’s death and the investigation of the Oklahoma City Bombing.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  As I reported in a Nov. 23 update to a piece published Sept. 9, a new Oklahoma City Bombing trial is set to take place May 5, July 28-30, 2014 in Salt Lake City.  With Judge Clark Waddoups presiding in the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah, Central Division, the trial is scheduled to begin at 8:30 a.m. local time and is expected to last three days.  Hopefully, the upcoming trial will grab the attention of more Americans who, like Trentatude, merely want to know the truth.

Untold Stories of the OKC BombingTo learn more about Jesse Trentadue’s quest to learn more about his brother’s deaths, read my posts in the series, Kenneth Trentadue Murder Case, or watch this chilling one-hour video in which he recounts his long-running battle for truth.

To learn more about the bigger picture surrounding this case, read my series, UNTOLD STORIES of the OKLAHOMA CITY BOMBING, which includes my Exclusive Interviews About the Oklahoma City Bombing Investigation.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

New Oklahoma City Bombing Trial Set for Spring 2014

UPDATE #3 2/28/2014 at 4:40 p.m. Central:  I just learned from a source close to the case that it has been pushed back to July 28-30.

UPDATE #2 11/23/2013 at 9:56 a.m. Central:  Judge Clark Waddoups has set May 5, 2014, as the date on which the next Oklahoma City Bombing trial will begin in the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah, Central Division.  The trial will begin at 8:30 a.m. local time and is expected to last three days.  For more details about the trial, see Memo Filed in Advance of 2014 Oklahoma City Bombing Trial.

UPDATE 9/15/2013 at 4:55 p.m. Central:  Fox News Channel’s Eric Shawn is finally on the case.  See video below:

A federal judge in Utah ruled today that a trial will be held to resolve a long-running legal battle between Jesse Trentadue and the FBI over videotape footage recorded in downtown Oklahoma City April 19, 1995 — footage the Salt Lake City attorney believes will help him unravel a mystery almost two decades old.

Untold Stories of the OKC BombingThe mystery in this case surrounds the death of Jesse Trentadue’s brother, Kenneth Trentadue, who died under suspicious circumstances while in custody at the U.S. Bureau of Prisons Federal Transfer Center in Oklahoma City several months after the Oklahoma City Bombing.

Via the Freedom of Information Act, Jesse Trentadue has spent most of the past five years trying to obtain copies of videotape images captured by more than 20 surveillance cameras operating in the vicinity of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City prior to 9:02 a.m. on that fateful spring day.

While the FBI did produce tapes from the buildings around the Murrah Building, the tapes had been edited, Trentadue said.  As for the tapes from the cameras on the Murrah Building, the contents of which are described in a timeline prepared by the Secret Service, the FBI does not dispute that the existence of the unedited versions of the surveillance tapes recorded prior to the blast; instead, they say they cannot find them.  In addition, FBI officials have refused to provided the one-time star athlete at the University of Southern California with a copy of the original videotape showing the arrest of Timothy McVeigh as recorded on the dashboard camera of Oklahoma Highway Patrol Trooper Charles Hanger’s vehicle the day of the bombing.

In a piece published 29 months ago, I shared an excerpt from a memo Jesse Trentadue presented to the judge overseeing this case, Judge Clark Waddoups of the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah, Central Division, who made today’s ruling.  Shown below, it highlights how FBI officials seem to want to limit the public’s access to the videotapes by ignoring transparency laws such as FOIA:

The American public has a right to know what happened in Oklahoma City on the morning of April 19, 1995 and, more importantly, why?  Yet, it is obvious that for some reason FBI Defendants do not want the truth about the Oklahoma City bombing made public.  Perhaps the reason is as simple as: the Federal Government’s prior knowledge of that planned attack and failure to prevent it, or that there were others involved whom the Federal government chose not to expose and/or prosecute.  But whatever the reason, that is precisely why the FOIA became law: to protect the right of American citizens to know their own history and, more importantly, their government.  And that is why the Court should reject the FBI Defendants’ claim that their only obligation is to search their computerized records for this evidence knowing that it is not there and once that search they knew would fail has been concluded, they need do no more.

Today’s ruling could force the FBI to hand over the videotape footage which they’ve never denied existed but have been more than reluctant to have anyone see.

To gain a better understanding of why Jesse Trentadue has pursued this information so diligently, watch the video below — the pertinent segment of which begins just before the 3-minute mark:

Jesse Trentadue told me he expects the trial will be scheduled to take place Spring 2014.

To learn more about this case, read Truth Remains Elusive 18 Years After Oklahoma City Bombing and other articles in my series, Untold Stories of the Oklahoma City Bombing.  Dating back to April 2009, it includes more than 30 original articles.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Are FBI Informants Working Inside America’s Churches?

Jesse Trentadue’s ongoing effort to obtain information from the FBI continued this week when he filed a motion (PDF) Wednesday aimed at convincing a federal judge in Utah to allow him access to information about the FBI’s “Sensitive Informant Program.  The move was made one month after the Salt Lake City attorney filed his first motion — the details of which appeared in a post Jan. 30 — seeking, among other things, to learn whether the FBI has informants working inside American churches.

Trentadue Motion for Limited Disc 2-27-13

Click to download motion (PDF).

Why is Trentadue seeking the information?  Because he believes it will lead him closer to the truth about the 1995 death of his brother, Kenneth Trentadue, under suspicious circumstances while in custody at the U.S. Bureau of Prisons Federal Transfer Center in Oklahoma City.

Below, I share the fascinating details of his most-recent motion (PDF).  Beginning with the “Background” which begins on page one of the document, the details contained in the document appear below, minus the footnotes contained in the actual document:

The FBI devotes a considerable portion of the Memorandum that it submitted in opposition to Plaintiff’s Motion to arguing that this is a typical Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”) case involving the adequacy of the FBI’s search for responsive documents and/or the applicability of the exemptions claimed by the FBI for not releasing the documents/records.  But this is not a typical FOIA case. Neither is it an isolated or stand alone case. This case, as the FBI well knows, is the latest front in Plaintiff’s long war with the Bureau to discover and uncover the truth about the Oklahoma City Bombing and a related matter: the murder of his brother, Kenneth Michael Trentadue.

Untold Stories of the OKC BombingThe first battle in this almost decade long FOIA war was fought before this very Court in Trentadue v. FBI, which revealed that persons other that Timothy McVeigh, Terry Nichols and Michael Fortier had participated in the Bombing. That first battle, and the documents/records that Plaintiff obtained as a result, also disclosed: (1) the existence of the FBI’s I-Drive and S-Drive computer systems wherein evidence related to the Bombing was kept hidden so as not to be subject to a FOIA request and/or not made part of the FBI’s official Bombing case file; (2) the CIA’s involvement in the Oklahoma City Bombing; (3) “Patriot Conspiracy” or “PATCON” that was a decade or more long FBI undercover operation designed to infiltrate and monitor or perhaps even incite various right-wing organizations; and (4) the existence of a surveillance camera videotape taken on the morning of April 19, 1995, which according to federal government documents purportedly shows not only the destruction of the Alfred P. Murrah Building, but also the persons who carried out that attack.  That first FOIA battle also disclosed the existence of the FBI’s “Sensitive Informant Program,” which is at the heart of this current FOIA discovery dispute.

The Sensitive Informant Program is the FBI’s disturbing practice of using private citizens as spies on the staffs of members of Congress and perhaps even federal judges, in the national media, within other federal agencies, on defense teams in high profile federal and/or state criminal prosecutions, inside state and local law enforcement agencies and even among the clergy of organized religions. The Sensitive Informant Program is designed to and does result in the circumvention of the protections guaranteed to American citizens by the Bill of Rights and the Separation of Powers Doctrine.

In response to Plaintiff’s FOIA request for the policies, rules, protocols and/or procedures governing the FBI’s recruitment and use of such informants in this secret surveillance program which spies on United States’ citizens on United States’ soil, the FBI produced 205 pages, which appear to be but a small portion of its: “Corporate Policy Directive” on the use of confidential human sources, “Confidential Human Source Validation Standards Manual,” “Confidential Human Source Policy Manual,” and “Domestic Investigations and Operations Guide” (collectively the “Manual”). Those portions of the Manual that the FBI actually provided to Plaintiff were heavily redacted. The FBI withheld all of these portions of the Manual on the basis of various exemptions from disclosure under FOIA.

It is Plaintiff’s belief, however, that NO exemption can be asserted to conceal this unconstitutional domestic spy/surveillance program. Simply put, FOIA, which has as its stated purpose the disclosure of the federal government’s wrongdoing, cannot and should not be used to shield the FBI’s unconstitutional actions undertaken on what appears to be a national scale. However, in order to properly frame and present to the Court his challenge to the FBI’s claims of exemption Plaintiff needs to conduct limited discovery into the scope and duration of this Sensitive Informant Program.

In the “Summary of the Argument,” beginning on page four of the motion, he presents the latest details:

Plaintiff’s need for this discovery is simple. If, for example, the FBI has never embedded a Sensitive Informant on the staff of a member of Congress and/or a federal judge, in the national media, within another federal agency, on the defense team in high profile federal and/or state criminal prosecution, inside of a state or local law enforcement agency or among the clergy of an organized religion, it will admittedly be difficult for Plaintiff to assert that NO FOIA exemptions should apply to those portions of the Manual being withheld from him. This is so because a rare or isolated violation of the Constitution by the use of Sensitive Informants may not be sufficient for the Court to override the FBI’s exemption claims.

However, if the FBI’s Sensitive Informant program has been in operation for years and/or involves the placement of many Sensitive Informants on the staffs of members of Congress and perhaps even federal judges, in the national media, within other federal agencies, on defense teams in high profile federal and/or state criminal prosecutions, inside state and local law enforcement agencies or among the clergy of organized religions, then it is obvious that the Manual is designed to and/or does result in the circumvention of the protections guaranteed to American citizens by the Bill of Rights and the Separation of Powers Doctrine. If this is so, then it is Plaintiff’s position that the FBI cannot lawfully assert any FOIA exemption to keep secret a clearly unconstitutional nationwide program of domestic spying.

The information that Plaintiff’s seeks by way of this discovery will also be necessary for the Court to determine whether the (b)(1) exemption claimed by the FBI applies. Exemption (b)(1) allows the FBI to exempt certain records provided it declares them “secret” on the basis of national security AND pursuant to an Executive Order allowing for that “secret” designation.

In order to obtain information with respect to the scope and duration of the FBI’s Sensitive Informant Program, Plaintiff has moved to conduct limited discovery consisting of just eleven (11) Interrogatories, the answers to which will document the unconstitutionality of the FBI’s Sensitive Informant Program, thereby allowing Plaintiff to challenge the FBI’s assertion of FOIA exemptions to conceal and/or withhold the Manual from Plaintiff and the American public, and the Court to determine the validity/applicability of those exemptions to the Manual. The FBI, however, vehemently opposes that Motion.

Of course, there is a lot more to the case, but Trentadue’s approach, summed up under the “ISSUE” section of the motion and shared below, seems brilliant to this non-lawyer:

The issue in this case is not the adequacy of the FBI’s search for the Manual. The FBI found the Manual. The issue for the Court to decide is (1) whether the FOIA exemptions advanced by the FBI for withholding portions of the Manual apply and (2), even if they do apply, can those exemptions be lawfully asserted to conceal FBI activities that clearly subvert the Constitution? Furthermore, this issue cannot and should not be decided without the discovery that Plaintiff is seeking to obtain through his Motion to Conduct Limited Discovery.

During an email exchange late Friday, Trentadue used layman’s terms to boil the matter down to one key issue.

“The FBI argues that the discovery (he) seeks would be futile since ‘illegal’ activity by the federal government is shielded from disclosure under FOIA if covered by an exemption,” he explained.

He went on to question how the FBI can, in good faith, claim that a national security exemption allows the Bureau to declare its unconstitutional domestic spying program “secret” and, in turn, allows them to keep their illegal activities hidden from the public.

“It is an absurd — no, arrogant — position for the FBI to take,” he said.

Stay tuned for details about how this case turns out.  Also, be sure to read earlier articles in my series, UNTOLD STORIES of the OKLAHOMA CITY BOMBING.

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Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Brother of Murder Victim Seeks Details of FBI’s ‘Sensitive Informant Program’

Salt Lake City attorney Jesse Trentadue filed a motion Monday asking a federal judge to determine whether he is entitled to limited discovery into the FBI’s “Sensitive Informant Program.”

Trentadue Motion for Discovery 1-28-13

Click to download copy of motion (pdf).

In his motion, Trentadue described the program as one used by the bureau “to recruit and/or place informants on the staffs of members of the United States Congress and perhaps even federal judges, in the national media, within other federal agencies as well as the White House, on defense teams in high-profile federal and/or state criminal prosecutions, inside state and local law enforcement agencies, and even among the clergy of organized religions.”

Trentadue’s interest in the program stems from questions that have surfaced during his ongoing investigation into the death of Kenneth Trentadue, his brother who died in 1995 under suspicious circumstances while in custody at the U.S. Bureau of Prisons Federal Transfer Center in Oklahoma City, months after the Oklahoma City Bombing.

Kenneth-Trentadue_Pic

Click to learn more at http://KennethTrentadue.com.

With his latest legal maneuver, Trentadue hopes to convince Judge Clark Waddoups to compel the FBI to provide all documentation outlining what he describes in the motion as an “unlawful and unconstitutional domestic spying program.”

The maneuver comes almost four weeks after the FBI answered a federal court complaint Trentadue filed under the Freedom of Information Act to obtain copies of the manual the FBI uses to recruit and place “sensitive informants.”  Citing national security concerns as the basis for their response, FBI officials answered that complaint by saying they “can neither confirm nor deny the allegations [of the Complaint] regarding its confidential informant program.”

Shown below, Trentadue’s definition of a “sensitive informant” is, perhaps, the most interesting aspect of his motion:

“…the term ‘Sensitive Informant’ is defined as anyone acting, directly or indirectly and with or without any compensation, on behalf of the FBI as a member of, person associated with or otherwise a participant in or observer of the activity or activities of an entity, organization, group, governmental agency or unit, association of organizations or individuals, public official, member of Congress, judge, cleric and/or religious or political organization AND who does not disclose or reveal to such entity, organization, group, governmental agency or unit, association of organizations or individuals, public official, member of Congress, judge, cleric and/or religious or political organization his or her FBI affiliation.

“A Sensitive Informant is, in other words, some one who is acting, directly or indirectly, on behalf of the FBI as an undisclosed participant in or observer of the activity or activities of an entity, organization, group, governmental agency or unit, association of organizations or individuals, public official, member of Congress, judge, cleric and/or religious or political organization.

“The term ‘Sensitive Informant’ likewise includes what the FBI’s current terminology refers to as a ‘Confidential Human Source’ including any and all sub-categories of Confidential Human Sources such as, but not limited to, what the FBI refers to as a ‘Privileged Confidential Human Source,’ who is someone reporting confidential information to the FBI in violation of a privilege such as an attorney reporting his client’s confidential communications, a physician reporting upon his patient’s medical or mental condition, a cleric informing on a member of his or her church or other religious organization, etc.

In his motion, Trentadue requested the judge order FBI officials to answer 11 critical questions about the scope of their “Sensitive Informant Program” prior to a yet-to-be-scheduled hearing during which, according to Trentadue, FBI officials have said they will file a motion for summary judgment to prevent him access to the information he seeks.

Looking only for numbers of Sensitive Informants and not for specific names from the FBI, Trentadue’s questions target the time frame, “since January 1, 1995.”  In short, he wants to know whether or not the agency has had Sensitive Informants inside a variety of government and non-governmental organizations.

Among the government organizations mentioned in his queries were the state and federal court systems, the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate, federal agencies other than the FBI, federal prosecutors’ offices, and law enforcement agencies at the municipal, county and state levels.

Among non-governmental agencies, he listed management positions inside news organizations, including but not limited to, the following:  Associated Press, ABC, CBS, CNN, FOX, MSNBC, NBC, NPR, PBS, Reuters or Scripps-Howard; Boston Globe, Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, Miami Herald, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and/or Washington Post; The Daily Beast, Mother Jones, The New American, Newsweek, TIME and/or U.S. News & World Report.

Curiously, he also asked whether the FBI has had a Sensitive Informant(s) who was a cleric or member of the clergy in any religious organization.

Though I doubt the FBI will answer Trentadue’s questions, I’m convinced the attorney will continue fighting until he learns the whole truth about his brother’s death and, perhaps, about the Oklahoma City Bombing, too.

Untold Stories of the OKC Bombing

Click to read other posts in my series, “Untold Stories of the OKC Bombing.”

To appreciate the full scope and breadth of Trentadue’s latest effort, I suggest you read the motion.  It’s one of more than two-dozen posts I’ve published in my series, Untold Stories of the Oklahoma City Bombing.  Included in the series are more than a dozen posts about Trentadue’s pursuit of the truth.

If you don’t have time to peruse it all, simply read my Sept. 11, 2012, post, One-Hour Video Will Chill You, or watch the video below.

"Three Days In August" Promotional PhotoBob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August: A U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier’s Fight For Military Justice, a nonfiction book that’s available in paperback and ebook via most online booksellers, including Amazon.com. His second book, The CLAPPER MEMO, is coming soon was released May 2013.

Attorney Relentless in Pursuit of Truth About Brother’s Death

Since September 2009, I’ve written more than a dozen posts about Jesse Trentadue’s quest for answers about the death of his brother, Kenneth Trentadue, who died in 1995 under suspicious circumstances while in custody at the U.S. Bureau of Prisons Federal Transfer Center in Oklahoma City months after the Oklahoma City Bombing.  If there’s one thing I’ve learned about the Salt Lake City attorney along the way, it’s that he is relentless.

Today, less than seven weeks after sharing a chilling one-hour video of Jesse Trentadue speaking to an audience about his pursuit of truth, I share new details about a  24-page complaint he filed Thursday.

Via email Saturday afternoon, Trentadue told me his latest legal move was made in an effort to convince a federal court judge in Utah to compel the FBI to provide all documentation outlining what he describes as the agency’s “practice/program to recruit and place informants in the national media; on staffs of Senators, Congressmen and perhaps even federal judges; on defense teams in high profile federal criminal prosecutions; in the clergy; in other federal agencies, including the White House; and in local law enforcement.”  To date, the FBI has provided only a portion of the manuals.

Trentadue uncovered the existence of this secret surveillance program, according to the complaint, as the result of his related Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the FBI defendants to obtain a copy of the videotape taken on the morning of April 19, 1995, by external surveillance cameras mounted on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City, which federal government records state recorded both the delivery of the bomb which destroyed the Murrah Building that morning and the perpetrators of that attack.

It will be interesting to see what, if any, tactics the FBI employs to keep the remaining documents out of Jesse Trentadue’s hands.

Stay tuned!

UPDATE 11/02/2012 at 7:55 p.m. Central:  I haven’t had time to write an update myself, so take a look at this one – The Good, The Fast, and The Furious.

Bob McCarty is the author of “Three Days In August: A U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier’s Fight For Military Justice,” a nonfiction book that’s available in paperback and ebook via most online booksellers, including Amazon.com. His second book, “The CLAPPER MEMO,” is set for release this fall.

One-Hour Video Will Chill You

If you think Islamic terrorists are the only people Americans should be concerned about on this 11th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, think again.

If you think what you’ve heard about Operation Fast and Furious is about as bad as anything can get when it involves the U.S. Department of Justice, think again.

Beginning at the 4-minute mark of the video above, the story of one man’s investigation into the August 1995 murder of Kenneth Trentadue inside the U.S. Bureau of Prisons’ Federal Transfer Center in Oklahoma City will chill you to the bone.  The story is told by Trentadue’s brother, Salt Lake City attorney Jesse Trentadue.

After watching the video, please take time to share it.

FYI:  I also invite you to read some of the more than two-dozen pieces I’ve written about the Oklahoma City Bombing, a dozen of which either focus upon or mention the Kenneth Trentadue murder case.  Thanks in advance!

Bob McCarty’s first nonfiction book, “Three Days In August: A U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier’s Fight For Military Justice,” is available in paperback and ebook via most online booksellers, including Amazon.com.  His second nonfiction book, “The CLAPPER MEMO,” is set for release this fall.