Tag Archives: McClatchy News

YOU Might Be On A Federal Watch List!

Fifteen months after news broke about federal investigators targeting people engaged in the cottage industry of teaching others how to pass polygraph exams, I suspect many who purchased my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, might be on a federal watch list.

Polygraph Exam

Why? Because, according to a report Nov. 14, 2013, officials with multiple federal government agencies confirmed to McClatchy News reporter Marisa Taylor that they had collected and shared the personal information of thousands of Americans in an attempt to root out untrustworthy federal workers.  Specifically, those officials confirmed that people who had no direct ties to the U.S. government and had simply purchased certain books — about polygraph-beating techniques — had been scrutinized.

Perhaps most disturbing is that the government agencies contacted by Taylor said they plan to retain the list of people who purchased the aforementioned books in case any of those on the list take polygraphs for federal jobs or criminal investigations in the future.

Again, I suspect most people who purchased The Clapper Memo, a book in which a person can read about many countermeasures available to defeat the polygraph, have no such direct ties and, therefore, meet the description above.

If you’re tempted to believe it makes sense for government officials to build lists of people based on their book-purchasing habits — for future reference, of course — then I implore you to look deeper into the subject matter by reading The Clapper Memo. The product of an exhaustive four-year investigation into the government’s use of credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, the book will open your eyes to troubling decisions made by federal government officials — including Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., the man now serving as our nation’s top intelligence official — that have far-reaching and extremely-dangerous implications for the American people.

Many influential people who read The Clapper Memo were stunned at what they learned.

Capt. Larry W. Bailey, U.S. Navy (Ret.), a former commander of the U.S. Navy’s Basic Underwater Demolition/SEALs (BUD/S) Training Program, believes I have revealed “An unconscionable cover-up.”

Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely, U.S. Army (Ret.), former deputy commander, U.S. Army Pacific, said, “Bob McCarty has uncovered a high-tech ‘turf war’ pitting those who want the best for our troops against others who seem to be focused on their own self-interests.  Sadly, it seems the wrong people are winning this war.  I highly recommend The Clapper Memo.”

David P. Schippers, U.S. House of Representatives chief investigative counsel during the impeachment of President Bill Clinton, said, “Bob McCarty’s book, The Clapper Memo, represents perhaps the most thorough investigative reporting I have encountered in years.  I direct the attention of the so-called major media to it.  This is how it’s done!”

Others have spoken favorably of the book as well. Click here for details.

For a complete understanding of what I uncovered, order a copy of The Clapper Memo today.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Intel Boss ‘Truly Insane,’ According to Former CIA Director

In a McClatchy News article today, Marisa Taylor reports that Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. issued a new polygraph policy Sept. 14 which requires federal government agencies conducting polygraph exams to ask applicants and employees if they have leaked classified information to the media. Doing so places him among the “truly insane,” according to one former CIA director.

Former CIA Director John Deutch quoted in New York Times 12/10/1995.

Former CIA Director John Deutch quoted in New York Times 12/10/1995.

On page 6 of a New York Times article published Dec. 10, 1995, reporter Tim Weiner quoted former CIA Director John Deutch talking about the CIA, saying, “Their reliance on the polygraph is truly insane,” and I couldn’t agree more.

What Clapper, the nation’s top intelligence official, ignores by issuing a new polygraph policy and, more importantly, by remaining joined at the hip with backers of century-old polygraph technology, is a long list of polygraph failures.

In Chapter 15 of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, I not only challenge readers to conduct their own research of convicted spies such as John Anthony Walker Jr., Jonathan Jay Pollard, Ana Belen Montes, and other U.S. government employees, but I let them know what they’ll find — that is, that the vast majority of those convicted of spying for foreign governments had been subject to regular polygraph examinations as a condition of their federal government employment. Some spied for years and years before being caught! Edward Snowden is merely the most recent example of an intelligence professional with a high-level security clearance to make reliance on the polygraph appear foolish.

Further into the same chapter, I share details about other well-known top government officials and their feelings about the polygraph.

I cite an article published Dec. 20, 1985, in the Los Angeles Times. In it, Norman Kempster reported that George Schulz, then serving as President Ronald Reagan’s Secretary of State, was not a fan of the polygraph and, in fact, had threatened to resign rather than submit to a polygraph examination.

I also point to an article, published in the March 8, 1994, edition of The New York Times. In it, Ronald Kessler shared details about how former CIA Director R. James Woolsey seemed to harbor the same sentiment about the polygraph:

The day after the arrest of the accused spy Aldrich H. Ames was announced, the Director of Central Intelligence, R. James Woolsey, met with several hundred C.I.A. employees in the agency’s auditorium at Langley, Virginia. After recounting what employees already knew from the news media, Mr. Woolsey — whose address was seen on closed-circuit television by every C.I.A. employee — spent five minutes explaining why he himself had refused to take a polygraph test, as other recent directors had done. Besides the fact that political appointees are not required to take such tests, Mr. Woolsey said he remained “skeptical” about the polygraph’s effectiveness.

Why does Clapper stick with this highly-suspect technology? To answer that question, I conducted a four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of so-called credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph. My findings appear inside The Clapper Memo, a book that has received rave reviews from several top-flight people whose names you might recognize.

To learn more about the findings of my investigation, read other posts about the book.

To understand everything I’ve uncovered, order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.