Tag Archives: mental institution

Sean Hannity Accomplice to Crime of Military Injustice

When the folks at “The Sean Hannity Show” published an article under the headline, U.S. Army Eating it’s Own: A Green Beret Needs Our Help, my head nearly exploded! Then I concluded Sean Hannity can only be described as an accessory to the crime of military injustice committed by the U.S. Army against one of its own, Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Stewart.

Click on image above to read article at Hannity.com.

Click on image above to read article at Hannity.com.

Why? Because I’ve been plugging away for almost four years, trying to get anyone in the mainstream news media — Sean Hannity included — to pay attention to Stewart’s case.

Stewart, a Green Beret medic and Level One sniper, was falsely accused in November 2008 of rape and kidnapping by a then-28-year-old German woman. Nine months later, he was convicted during a military trial that took place during three days in August 2009.

Interestingly, no physical evidence or eyewitnesses were presented by the Army prosecutor during that trial. The guilty verdict seemed to hinge solely on the words of the accuser, a woman who not only spent months in a mental institution prior to meeting Stewart but also stood to gain financially (i.e., her government would compensate her as a “victim of sexual assault”) if Stewart was found guilty. In the end, she made money.

During a post-trial hearing months after the conviction, several individuals who did not know Stewart testified that his accuser had told multiple lies while on the witness stand during the trial. After hearing their testimony, however, the military judge decided to ignore it.

Today, after serving time behind bars at the U.S. Military Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Stewart lives as a convicted sex offender with nothing to show after a stellar career during which he served in places like Kosovo and Iraq and rose to the top one percent of the Army without a single blemish on his record until he was falsely accused.

One would think such a story might interest Hannity, but no.

Even with an inside track to one of Hannity’s radio show producers, whom I don’t hold responsible for Hannity’s poor decisions, Hannity hasn’t devoted a moment of on-air attention to the case of the highly-decorated combat veteran whose life story is chronicled in my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August.

Even with endorsements of the book by New York Times best-selling author Richard Miniter, anti-Islamic terrorism activist and Atlas Shrugs founder Pam Geller, The Band of Mothers founder Beverly Perlson and others, Hannity has opted to ignore the military injustice suffered by this elite Soldier.

Hannity may have high ratings on radio and television, but I’ve turned him off.

Click on image above to order copy of book.

Click on image above to order copy of book.

To learn more about Stewart, visit ThreeDaysInAugust.com or read other articles about his case. To order a copy of the book, click here or on one of the links below.

FYI: Yes, I realize I’m burning a bridge by publishing this piece, but who cares; it was a bridge to nowhere.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

‘SUDDEN JIHAD’ SYNDROME? Missouri Bus Station Murder Shares Much in Common with Boston Marathon Bombing

The Boston Marathon Bombing trial garnered a lot of media attention in recent days, in part, because the men suspected of committing the attack were Muslims and the attack itself bore earmarks of Islamic terrorism.  Conversely, a deadly shooting that took place in Missouri almost four years ago involved a Muslim man as the alleged shooter but has received little news coverage beyond the Show-Me State.

Mohamed H. Dawod

Mohamed H. Dawod

Less than 48 hours before the 10th anniversary of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, witnesses say then-25-year-old Mohamed H. Dawod shot to death Justin Hall, 32, of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, at a Greyhound bus station in Springfield, Mo. Soon after the shooting, Dawod found himself facing charges of first-degree murder and armed criminal action.

Almost two years of hearings and mental health assessments followed, and Dawod was committed to a mental institution to face mental evaluations every six months until he is deemed competent to stand trial or permanently committed.

Should Dawod face trial instead of remaining in a mental institution?

Some might claim Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the 19-year-old Boston Marathon bomber, was crazy when he participated in the plot that killed three spectators and wounded more than 260 others at the site of the famous footrace. Still, he was found guilty of multiple crimes, including murder, for his actions in concert with his 26-year-old brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who died in a shootout with police hours after the bombing.

Witnesses reported Dawod and his alleged victim were passengers on a bus traveling from Amarillo, Texas, but did not to know each other, and were preparing to board the bus for the last leg of the journey to St. Louis when the shooting took place.

Soon after the shooting took place, police officials in Missouri’s third-largest city were quick to label the incident involving the Glendale, Ariz., native as “random,” according to a Sept. 9, 2011, report in the Springfield News-Leader.

According to a local television report the same day, those same police officials said that, because of a language barrier, they had only learned Dawod’s name and had asked the FBI to help them with the investigation.  Also in that report was this:

Ten separate witnesses say they did not notice the men fighting or arguing before the shooting.  One passenger said she watched the suspect wander around the terminal until the call to line up to re-board the bus.  “She then observed the suspect remove a silver and black handgun from a back pack he was carrying,” the officer wrote.  “The suspect then pointed the handgun upward while saying something.  The witness could not understand what the suspect said and didn’t know if he was speaking English.”  No matter what was said the witness said Hall didn’t react or turn around.  Shortly after the witness says Dawod shot him from a few feet away.

Soon after the shooting, I wondered aloud whether the words Dawod reportedly shouted as he pointed his gun in the air could have been “Alluh Akbar,” the cry that’s been heard coming from the mouths of so many Islamic extremists moments before they suffer from so-called “sudden jihad syndrome.”  Unable to answer that question with certainty, I pointed readers to a same-day report in the Springfield News-Leader that contained more insight about the supposed “language barrier.”

Click image above to read charges filed against Mohamed H. Dawod in Greene County, Mo.

Click image above to read charges filed against Mohamed H. Dawod in Greene County, Mo.

Based largely on interviews with three people who were at the scene of the shooting, the article noted two observations I had made early on in my coverage of the case — that is, the shooter tried to fire again but could not because his gun jammed and witnesses believed the shooter intended to shoot several people.  In addition, however, it noted that Patrick Beeman, Hall’s traveling companion, said Dawod asked police a question in English after he was arrested:  “He said, ‘if I quit shooting at people, can I get back on the bus?’”  In other words, he does speak English!

Because I haven’t seen any news coverage of the Dawod case since the report of Dawod being committed, I sent email messages to two people — Dawod’s defense attorney, Stuart Paul Huffman, and Greene County, Mo., Prosecutor Dan Patterson — this morning. In my message, I requested “as much detail as possible” about Dawod’s status.

As soon as I hear back from these men, I will provide an update in this space. Stay tuned.

UPDATE 5/15/2015 at 1:25 p.m. Central:  Dawod has been declared incompetent to proceed with trial, according to Greene County Prosecutor Dan Patterson as reported in this article published Thursday. The next step? A probate court proceeding will take place and Keith Schafer, director of the Missouri Department of Mental Health, will decide whether to move forward with either commitment or guardianship proceedings.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

What Did Soldier’s Accuser Have to Hide From the Court?

“There was never a discussion about what Greta (Heinrich) was in (the mental institution) for,” said former U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart.  “She testified that she was only in for simple ‘burnout,’ but she would never provide her medical records (and) the jurors never got to know that.”

Kelly A. Stewart

Kelly A. Stewart

Unfortunately for the Special Forces member and elite Green Beret, his German accuser invoked her rights under German law to not disclose her medical records. Likewise, the German government refused to release copies of her medical records.

That led David Court, Stewart’s civilian defense attorney, to conclude that “She has obviously got something that she wishes to withhold.”

“If I was a juror and I found out that this chick was saying that someone had raped her, that she had spent time in a mental institution… and now she’s saying that this American service member…is being accused of rape, it would add a shadow of doubt in my mind and any normal person’s mind,” said Stewart.

In Three Days In August, I reveal details about this issue and many others that surfaced during the courtroom drama that, in less than 48 hours, resulted in Stewart being found guilty on sexual assault charges; and, in less than 72 hours, saw him sentenced to eight years behind bars. Based almost solely on the testimony of his accuser. No physical evidence. No eyewitnesses.

To learn more about Kelly Stewart and his brush with military justice, order a copy of Three Days In August.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.