Tag Archives: NATO

Bob McCarty Weekly Recap: Nov. 8-14, 2015

The past week was full of news about a multitude of events in which many of the participants attached themselves to their own definition of justice. In my weekly recap below, I offer a review of those events and how I followed them Nov. 8-14, 2015.

Mizzou Bowl-Eligible?

If resignations count as victories, does that mean the Missouri Tigers are bowl-eligible? Click on image above to read about political correctness on campus.

Sunday, Nov. 8

On my website, BobMcCarty.com, I shared nothing new. I did, however, share a few things on my Facebook page.

The week began with good news and bad news, depending upon who your favorite college football team is. For me, good news surfaced when my two favorite football teams, Oklahoma State and Oklahoma in that order, were ranked #8 and #12, respectively, in the college football playoff rankings for Week 11. For many of my neighbors, bad news surfaced when football players at the University of Missouri went on strike and prompted me — and many others in cyberspace — to ask, “Haven’t the Missouri Tigers been on strike all season? Ahem, 4-5?”

I also shared a few political points, including one aimed at Eric Greitens, a former Navy SEAL and Rhodes Scholar who’s running for governor as a Democrat Republican in Missouri. It seems he not only aligns with Al Gore and other liberals in promoting climate change propaganda, but he’s also a big fan of global governance. As a result, I’m siding with a trustworthy Marine, John Brunner, to be the Show-Me State’s next Republican governor.

On a more personal note, Sunday marked Day 100 of the fitness regimen I started Aug. 1, and I reported the loss of 17 pounds toward my goal of 30 that will bring me to the “ultimate fighting weight” at which I graduated from Air Force Officer Training School more than 30 years ago.

Monday, Nov. 9

My first article of the week appeared Monday under the headline, GREEN BERET: ‘The next thing you know, it felt like someone put lighter fluid on me and caught me on fire.’ An excerpt from my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August, it casts a light on details of an Army Special Forces Soldier’s brush with death following his conviction on bogus sexual assault charges.

Kelly Stewart returns from a mission in Iraq.

Kelly Stewart returns from a mission in Iraq.

Among the day’s updates on my Facebook page, I pointed to news about a Jordanian policeman waging an “insider attack” that killed two Americans as a stark reminder of some of the subject matter I covered in my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo. In addition, I dubbed The University of Missouri at Columbia “Ferguson West” as protests continued at the school with the football team that’s 4-5.

I also wondered, after reading an article about the Pentagon retracting a report on male-on-male sexual trauma, how long it will take before Defense Department leaders come clean and bring an end to the Pentagon’s insane efforts to convict men on sexual assault charges regardless of whether such assaults took place.

Tuesday, Nov. 10

My second article appeared Tuesday under the headline, Something’s Seriously Wrong When Military Justice System Sides With Psychics, Convicted Felons and Porn Queens. In it, I pointed readers to details about three cases that began with sexual assault allegations made against military men by three unique women: a self-described psychic, a convicted felon and a convicted felon. I couldn’t make this stuff up if I tried!

My third article appeared under the headline, Someone Else at Mizzou Should Resign or Be Fired ASAP, and actually produced results, though I’m not about to claim full credit.

Among the day’s updates on my Facebook page was one that featured a list of questions that came to mind after I read an article in The New York Times about the protests at Mizzou:

• What will happen when a journalist calls the campus police at the University of Missouri at Columbia to report students are trampling upon his freedom of the press?

• Will the campus police come to the aide of the journalist?

• What if the police don’t come to the aide of the journalist? That will make for some interesting reporting. It will also lead to some interesting explanations by the campus police.

• How long will it take for Reverend Al Sharpton and his gang of race hustlers to arrive on campus and begin stoking the fires of discontent?

• MOST IMPORTANT: Will Mizzou football fans stage a mass boycott of the team’s next home game or will it simply look as if they have taken the drastic step when so many stadium seats appear empty as the Tigers trudge through another forgettable season? So many questions. So little time.

Also on Facebook Tuesday, I managed to photograph members of an anarchist group appearing to break the law at my favorite St. Louis-area lake, and I asked a tongue-in-cheek question: Does notching two same-day victories (i.e., getting both the university system president and the chancellor to resign their positions), make the previously 4-5 University of Missouri Tigers football team bowl eligible? Inquiring minds want to know.

Wednesday, Nov. 11

On Veterans Day, I shared my fourth article under the headline, WW II Soldier About Brothers: ‘We All Came Home Alive!’ The piece includes some of my father’s reflections about his personal experiences during World War II.

Click on the image above to read my pieces about Veterans Day.

Click on the image above of my dad in his World War II Army uniform to read my pieces about Veterans Day.

I also shared two related pieces, Story of Four Not-So-Famous Brothers Inspires and V-MAIL: World War II Soldier Writes to Parents Back Home, on my Facebook page Wednesday.

And there was more:

• Related to the student protests at Mizzou, I shared a link to the abstract of the doctoral dissertation, “It’s ‘a good thing’: The commodification of femininity, affluence, and whiteness in the Martha Stewart phenomenon,” completed by Dr. Melissa Click at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst six years before she made headlines for all the wrong reasons at Mizzou;

• I observed how the folks at the state’s largest university had scheduled Mizzou Transgender Day of Remembrance on Veterans Day; and

• I reminded folks of how at least four Republican hopefuls are ineligible to serve as president, according to a man I trust who served twice as a member of the Electoral College.

Thursday, Nov. 12

My fifth article of the week, published Thursday, was more crass commercial message than news, because I asked people to do two things: 1) buy my books; and, afterward, 2) copy Steve Jennings’ example and send me photos of themselves holding copies of my books. Soon after, Ivan Nikolov took the bull by the horns and sent me a photo of himself holding up his copy of The Clapper Memo. Thanks, friend!

Facebook friend Ivan Nikolov holds a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Facebook friend Ivan Nikolov holds a copy of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo.

On my Facebook page Thursday, I shared an excerpt from my first crime-fiction novel, The National Bet, after teasing it with the question, “Ever imagine how horrible it would be if President Obama hijacked your retirement savings?” I also mentioned speaking to an Air Force officer who found himself in the midst of the sexual assault scandal at the Air Force’s Basic Military Training Program and is working on a book about it that I can’t wait to read.

Finally, I shared a priceless video (above) that features Fox Business Channel‘s Neil Cavuto interviewing Keely Mullen, Million Student March National Organizer, about her group’s demand that rich people pay for everyone else’s college costs, that all student loan debt is cancelled and that the minimum wage be raised to $15 an hour for workers on college campuses. After watching it, you’ll understand why I prefaced it with the comment, “I thought I heard the wind whistling through her head, ear to ear, as she spoke.”

Friday, Nov. 13

On Friday, my final article of the week offered another excerpt from my book, Three Days In August. Appearing under the headline, TDIA Book Excerpt: ‘I Wasn’t Going To Be That Dog,’ it is much like the excerpt I shared Monday’ except for that it describes what went through the mind of the elite Green Beret, whose life is the subject of the book, after he was railroaded by the politically-correct military justice system.

Among the items on my Facebook page Friday, I saluted a Medal of Honor recipient, noted the announcement about Gary Pinkel’s plan to retire as the U of Missouri’s football coach (more bad news for Tigers fans) and commented on a variety of other matters, the most important among them being the terror attacks in Paris.

Another five-star review of Three Days In August appeared on Amazon Friday, but I didn’t come across it until today; hence, this is the first mention I’ve made of it. Regardless, the review (below) is a good one and appears to have been written by an attorney:

I had a court-martial at Fort Benning where the Military Judge was the same judge who was presided over US v. Stewart. Both my client and I bought this book to obtain some G-2 on him. It is a really quick read and an informative look on the evolution of military justice in regards to sexual assault prosecutions, which has only grown worse. Bob McCarty has a keen knack for writing about military justice, and this book is by no means dull, particularly if you are a military justice practitioner, or you would like some insight to what it’s like to be sitting in a chair next to your TDS counsel if you are thrown into the military justice machine.

FYI: TDS is the Army acronym for Trial Defense Services (i.e., uniform-wearing defense attorneys).

Thanks in advance for reading and sharing the articles above and those to follow. For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter. Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same. To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Until next time.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

GREEN BERET: ‘The next thing you know, it felt like someone put lighter fluid on me and caught me on fire’

Having already survived several combat deployments in Iraq, Army Special Forces Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart never expected to come face to face with death during a tour of “schoolhouse duty” at a NATO training center in Germany, but he did. Some of the details of the Green Beret’s brush with death appear in the excerpt below from my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August:

Kelly Stewart returns from a mission in Iraq.

Kelly Stewart returns from a mission in Iraq.

Panicking because they had eaten up some time, they began hooking up bottles and IVs and then another bad thing happened: Stewart had an allergic reaction to a drug the German doctors used and went into anaphylactic shock.

“(There’s) nothing like being double-handcuffed and (having) your feet shackled and strapped to a bed (while) going into anaphylaxis,” Stewart said. “I’ve seen a lot of people go through it, but being conscious and going through it is very difficult.

“It just started off as being real tight in the chest,” he continued. “The next thing you know, it felt like somebody put lighter fluid on me and caught me on fire.

“I couldn’t breathe at all, and everybody was kind of panicking around me, trying to give me medication to stop what was happening.”

Soon, the Germans said they didn’t have a doctor who could treat him, that he was probably having liver and kidney failure and was probably going to die. Their message to the American cops: “We need to get him out of here.”

“Of course, I’m understanding what the Germans are saying and what they’re telling the cops,” Stewart said. “They’re kind of underhanded, saying, ‘We can’t treat him here. We need to send him over to Landstuhl,’” the U.S. Army’s largest hospital in Europe.

“What they’re saying in German is, ‘We need to get him out of here, because he’s not going to survive,’ and they didn’t want that (outcome) in their hospital.”

To learn details about the events leading up to and following Stewart’s hospital stay, order a copy of Three Days In August today!

Show your support and help keep these articles coming by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same. To learn how to order signed copies, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Preventable ‘Green-on-Blue’ Attack Costs Two American Lives

Two U.S. Airmen were killed early Thursday in Afghanistan in what appears to have been another “Green-on-Blue (a.k.a., ‘Insider’)” attack at Camp Antonik in Helmand province. According to an Air Force news release, Capt. Matthew D. Roland, 27, and Staff Sgt. Forrest B. Sibley, 31, were at a vehicle checkpoint when two individuals wearing Afghan National Defense and Security Forces uniforms opened fire on them. NATO service members returned fire and killed the shooters.

"Green-on-Blue" Casualties: Capt. Matthew D. Roland, 27, and Staff Sgt. Forrest B. Sibley, 31.

“Green-on-Blue” Casualties: Capt. Matthew D. Roland, 27, and Staff Sgt. Forrest B. Sibley, 31.

The attack on the special tactics experts came three years and 17 days after three Marines, Staff Sgt. Scott Dickinson, Lance Cpl. Greg Buckley Jr. and Cpl. Richard Rivera Jr., died as a result of a similar attack at Forward Operating Base Delhi. And it comes as only the most recent attack among dozens of attacks over the years that have resulted in hundreds of American and coalition casualties, including at least 150 dead and 186 wounded.

Believing they had been systematically misled about the death of their loved one at the hands of an Afghan “ally” during the days and weeks following the attack, family members of Lance Corporal Buckley filed a lawsuit against DoD seeking only information, not money. The complaint, according to a Washington Post report, was filed Oct. 16, 2014, in U.S. District Court in New York, and named the Department of Defense, the Navy Department and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service as defendants. In addition, it named Gen. James F. Amos, the now-retired commandant of the Marine Corps as defendants. The lawsuit is still active, according to Lance Corporal Buckley’s aunt, MaryLiz Grossetto, whom I contacted today by phone.

News of the lawsuit brought back memories of Grossetto’s response to a question — Should families of U.S. Soldiers be able to sue Department of Defense? — I raised Aug. 23, 2013, and posted on the Facebook page dedicated to her 21-year-old nephew who was killed during a “Green-on-Blue” (a.k.a., “Insider”) attack in Afghanistan Aug. 10, 2012.

Click on image above to read article.

Click on image above to read article.

Excerpts from her response appear below with only minor edits:

Bob, if you had asked anyone in my family that question a year ago I’m pretty sure the answer would have been “NO.”

What a difference a year makes!

A year ago, I would have thought, “God forbid something happens, that’s the risk you were willing to take.”

Of course, a year ago I was under the mistaken impression that this country was doing all it could to protect & provide for our military. Sadly, today I know that is not the case. This administration is more concerned with how the Afghans will perceive things than making sure our own men are as safe as possible.

Having learned a lot during the first year after her nephew’s death, Grossetto asked and answered some pointed questions late in her response:

Did we take measures to ensure our military would be safe? Did we order our men to carry loaded weapons at all times? Did we provide “Guardian Angels” to watch over our soldiers when they were most vulnerable? NO! WHY? Because we were too busy handing out pamphlets & ordering our soldiers to attend “culture & sensitivity training” so our heroes would not “offend” Afghans.

Did we use the best, most advanced equipment when it came to vetting these Afghan soldiers / police? NO!

Have we thoroughly investigated what happened to Extortion 17? NO!

Have we investigated & spoken the truth about Benghazi? NO!

Grossetto concluded her response this way:

So, in answer to your question, I guess we should start suing. Maybe that will help this administration get it’s priorities in order! Until Then, God Help Us All!

After reading my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, Grossetto recognized how I had connected the dots between three memos — including one issued by James R. Clapper Jr., now the nation’s top intelligence official — and the toll from Green-on-Blue attacks like the one that killed her nephew. In addition, she offered the following endorsement of my book:

“Read this book & you will see how our government has for many, many years deprived our military of the best possible tool for vetting & weeding out the enemy.”MaryLiz Grossetto.

Grossetto’s endorsement joined those of five others, including a former U.S. Navy SEALs commander, a former U.S. Army general, the parents of a member of the U.S. Navy’s SEAL TEAM SIX and the man who served as chief investigative counsel during the impeachment of President Bill Clinton. Read their conclusions about the book here.

To learn more about The Clapper Memo, read other posts about the book.

To understand everything I’ve uncovered, including details about how “Green-on-Blue” attacks can be prevented, order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

SEE ALSO:

Did Pentagon Do Enough to Prevent ‘Green-on-Blue’ Attacks? Questions Remain on Third Anniversary of Deadly Attack;

News About Lawsuit Filed By Marine’s Family Gains Traction;

Veteran Interrogator’s Words Strike Chord With Author;

Family Members of Fallen Marine File Lawsuit Against DoD.; and

DoD Still Keeping Best Vetting Technology From Warfighters.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Did Afghan Officials Play Role in ‘Extortion 17′ Deaths?

Could untrustworthy officials at the highest levels of the Afghan government be responsible for the single-largest loss of life in the history of U.S. Naval Special Warfare?  Almost a year after asking that question for the first time, I’m convinced they are. Below, I share information from an article I published Sept. 16, 2013.

Extortion 17 KIAs

Extortion 17 KIAs

On Aug. 6, 2011, a CH-47 “Chinook” — call sign “Extortion 17” — was shot down during the pre-dawn hours while on a mission to capture a bad guy in Afghanistan’s Wardak Province.  Among the dead, 30 Americans, most of whom were members of the U.S. Navy’s elite SEAL TEAM SIX.

Because the deaths of these “quiet professionals” came only weeks after Vice President Joe Biden compromised operational security by disclosing details about their unit’s involvement in a raid on Osama bin Laden‘s compound in Pakistan, some people — including some family members and friends of SEALs killed in the crash — believe the SEALs may have been sacrificed by the Obama Administration to appease followers of bin Laden.  More likely, however, is that they were set up by unvetted or poorly-vetted Afghan officials allowed to work closely with U.S. and Coalition Forces decision-makers.

Is it beyond the realm of possibilities to think Afghan officials are corrupt enough to engage in such activities?  Hardly  According to a report issued last week by the Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction, the following is true:

Widespread corruption in Afghanistan is a significant problem and remains a threat to the success of reconstruction and assistance programs. In 2012, Transparency International ranked Afghanistan in a tie with Somalia and North Korea as the most corrupt country in the world.  NOTE:  Here’s the link to the 2012 Corruption Perceptions Index if you want to see it for yourself.

These are likely the same kind of people who, after surviving a supposedly-thorough vetting process, have excelled at waging hundreds of often-deadly “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attacks against American and Coalition Forces mentors and advisors while wearing the uniforms of their country’s military, police and security agencies instead of the attire of government officials.

Exactly who are the Afghans officials who likely set up the warriors aboard Extortion 17?  Based on what I read among the more than 1,300 pages that make up the Extortion 17 crash investigation report produced by U.S. Central Command, I’d say its the high-level Afghans who serve on the Operational Coordination Group (OCG).

Early in the report, I found the transcript of a briefing conducted nine days after the crash by an American intelligence officer who, at one point, describes himself as “an SF guy by trade.”  His audience is a group of about 18 people assembled at Bagram Air Base as part of the investigation process that followed the crash.  The topic is the OCG’s participation in the war effort.  NOTE:  Because the copy of the report I received was redacted, the briefing officer’s branch of service and rank remain a mystery.  His words from the transcript, however, appear below:

“We made some real money with the OCG; they are the Operational Coordination Group and they assist us with the planning, and the vetting, and de-confliction of our operation,” said the intelligence officer on page 6 of one 134-page document.  “Likewise, once we are done executing the operation, they are able to send the results report, the result of the operations, up through their various administrates.  They are made up of the Afghan National Army, the National Director of Security, as well as the Afghan National Police Force.  They are here on site, but we also have them down at the regional level in RC-South and, in September, we are going to stand up region site up in RC-North.”

“So they have visibility on every operation?” asked the deputy investigating officer.

“Every operation,” the intel officer replied.

“So they knew about the operations?” the deputy asked, apparently wanting to confirm what he had just heard.

“Oh yea,” the intel officer confirmed.

“And they were briefed on it?” the deputy followed, again seeking confirmation.

“Absolutely,” came the reply.

Further down the same page, the deputy investigating officer asked another OCG-focused question – “So they have the ability, do they have approval authority on that, to cancel an operation?” – and the conversation continued:

“Technically, they do,” the intel officer replied.  “They don’t exercise it, but technically they do have (the) authority.”

“So they either task or approve the operation?” the deputy investigating officer said, seeking confirmation.

The answer:  “Yep.”

More than 50 pages deeper into the document, the investigating officer — then-Brig. Gen. Jeffrey N. Colt before being promoted in 2012 — asked for and received confirmation from the officer representing the Joint Special Operations Task Force Intelligence Directorate (J3) that every mission is vetted through the OCG.  He also received some background knowledge about the group.

“(The Operational Coordination Group),” the J3 representative told him and others in the room, “was formed over two years ago when we said we needed to have really better legitimacy in the eyes of (Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan) in order to maintain our freedom of maneuver. So, these guys are high level officials from Ministry of Defense, Ministry of Interior, and the National Directorate of Security.”

“Really the only thing we keep from them, obviously, is the (Top Secret) level how we got to the target piece of it,” he added a short time later.  “They are briefed on all the targets prior to execution and, you know, technically speaking if they would come to us and say, ‘I don’t want you to execute this mission,’ we wouldn’t do it.”

So, according to transcript, members of the OCG knew about the Extortion 17 mission in advance, were involved in assigning and/or approving the mission and could have vetoed the mission, but did not.

After realizing how deeply involved OCG members are in each mission, I asked myself a question — “Did a failure to properly screen top Afghan government officials before they were allowed to serve on the OCG help bring down Extortion 17?” — and set out to answer it.

SEARCH FOR AN ANSWER

I began by searching online for accurate information about the OCG.  Unfortunately, I found very little information about the group’s existence prior to the crash of Extortion 17. Even the International Security Assistance Force/NATO website contained no mentions of the OCG prior to the crash.

The only online mention of the OCG prior to the crash appeared in a Spring 2007 NATO Review article.  In it, the author, British Army Gen. David Richards, described the introduction of the OCG as a “significant development.”  NOTE:  “Spring 2007″ is a lot earlier than the “two years ago” description (i.e., August 2009) given by the J3 officer as the approximate date of the OCG’s launch.

Eight months after the crash, a DoD news release did mention the OCG, stating that the group had been given the authority to review and approve all special operations missions and to participate in intelligence fusion, monitor mission execution and make notifications to provincial governors.  Two months after that, an ISAF news release confirmed the same.

QUESTIONS ASKED

In addition to searching online, I submitted a list of questions to ISAF public affairs officers via email the morning of Sept. 11.  I wanted to know when and why the OCG was established and who participates in the OCG or comprises its membership.  Most importantly, I wanted to know if non-American and non-NATO individuals are vetted prior to their involvement in OCG and asked for a description of the vetting process if they are.

Two days later, the response I received from Lt. Col. Will Griffin, an Army public affairs officer assigned to ISAF Headquarters, was vague at best:

The OCG was established in 2010 to communicate ISAF Special Operations Forces headquarters’ intentions to our Afghan partners in an expedient and concise manner and likewise provide a means for Afghan National Security Force to convey their concerns and intentions to ISAF SOF HQ.

The OCG is comprised of representatives from coalition forces and Afghan liaison officers.  All Afghan partners are screened and certified by their ministries, as well as completing the same verification process as all liaison officers that work in secure ISAF installations.

Ten minutes after reading Colonel Griffin’s response, I replied by pointing out to the colonel that he had not included a requested description of the vetting process used to screen non-American and non-NATO members of the OCG.   Then I waited for another 15 hours.  Rather than receive a description of the vetting process, however, I received the following message:

The vetting process is a comprehensive look at the individual’s background, associates, personal history, etc.  Operational security considerations prevent me to go into further depth.

After Colonel Griffin offered little in terms of knowledge about the process used — if, in fact, there is one — to vet OCG members, I conducted a less-than-scientific survey of other sources, including friends and acquaintances who’ve spent varying lengths of time in Afghanistan and family members of American “Green-on-Blue” casualties.  The general consensus:  Afghans cannot be trusted.

QUESTIONS REMAIN

Does this information prove, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that some Afghan members of the OCG are corrupt?  No.

Does it prove that Afghan members of the OCG engaged in an effort to down Extortion 17?  No.

Does it prove the OCG has been comprised by Afghans who may be subject to a vetting process that’s even less stringent than that the one used to screen entry-level policemen, security guards and soldiers?  No.

Do negative answers to the three questions above mean the case is closed?  No!  Instead, they should prompt Americans to demand answers from their elected officials about Extortion 17 in much the same way they’ve demanded answers to questions surrounding the deaths of four Americans at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11, 2012.

In addition, I recommend reading, BETRAYED: The Shocking True Story of Extortion 17 as told by a Navy SEAL’s Father, by Billy Vaughn.  Along with his wife, Karen, the author of this book has spent a great deal of time and energy looking into the cause of the crash for one very personal reason:  Extortion 17 was the final mission of their son, Navy SEAL Aaron Carson Vaughn.

As you near the end of Vaughn’s book, you’ll find references to The Clapper Memo, my latest nonfiction book in which I share in-depth details about “Green-on-Blue”/”Insider” Attacks discovered during my four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph. I hope you’ll order a copy of my book, too.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.