Tag Archives: Navy

Bob McCarty’s Weekly Recap: Jan. 25-31

My recap for the week of Jan. 25 offers looks at a wide variety of topics — some of them radioactive!  Hope you enjoy and share what you find at BobMcCarty.com!

On Jan. 25, I found a check — dated Sept. 14, 1970, and payable to yours truly that appears to have never been cashed — and decided to look up the bank online to see if I might be able to cash it today.  I was astounded by what I discovered. Details in my post, Author Finds Uncashed Check in Box of Memories!

I found this check while rummaging through a box of old photos recently acquired from my parents.

Click on image above to read article.

As an author who recently spoke to law enforcement investigators from around the world about my second nonfiction book, I was intrigued by the findings of a recent scientific study about why innocent people confess to crimes. Read about it in my Jan. 26 post, Why Innocent People Confess to Crimes; Scientific Study Supports Findings of Nonfiction Book, The Clapper Memo.

Click image above to read article.

Click on image above to read article.

On Jan. 27, I shared a link on my Facebook page to an article about former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko who is thought to have been poisoned with polonium-210 on Oct. 16 and Nov. 1, 2006. Along with that link, I wrote, “This reminds me of something I read — after I wrote it, that is — in my just-released crime-fiction novel, The National Bet.”

Click image above to order a copy of the book.

Click image above to order a copy of the book.

Twenty-nine years ago this week, I was a young Air Force second lieutenant attending the Public Affairs Officer Course at the Defense Information School, then located at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indianapolis. During a break from morning classes, I gathered with a dozen or so of my classmates from the Army, Navy and Marine Corps in front of a breakroom television to watch the Space Shuttle Challenger launch. I share more details about that day in my Jan. 28 post, Challenger Disaster Recalled 29 Years Later.

This photograph of the space shuttle Challenger accident Jan. 28, 1986, was taken by a 70mm tracking camera at UCS 15 south of Pad 39B, at 11:39:16.795 EST. (NASA photo)

Click on image above to read article.

After reading about Andrew Sullivan informing his readers about his decision “to stop blogging in the near future,” I felt obligated to offer him a belated “thank you” for the sarcastic honor he conferred upon me a few years back. Find out why I thanked him in my Jan. 28 post, Former Blogger Offers Sarcastic ‘Thank You’ to Sullivan.

McCarty Hewitt Nomination 4-01-2010

Click on image above to read article.

On Jan. 29, I offered a look back at a subject to which Americans should pay attention as the 2016 swings into gear. Details appear under the headline, FLASHBACK 2009: Saul Alinsky’s ‘Rules for Radicals’ Reviewed.

Saul Alinsky 'Rules for Radicals' Rule 13

Click on image above to read article.

Also on Jan. 29, my attention was drawn to news about the Malaysian government declaring the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 an “accident. On my Facebook page, I wrote:

No worries. It was simply an accident. Barely a month ago at http://bobmccarty.com/?p=1654, I couldn’t help but try to draw connections between Malaysia Airlines Flight MH-370 that disappeared in March and a second Malaysia-owned jetliner that also disappeared. Do you believe MH-370 was an accident? Do you think there’s a connection between the two incidents?

The last item worth noting about Jan. 29 is the fact that I went to see the film, American Sniper, at a theater. Upon returning from that experience, I had a Facebook message conversation with Kelly Stewart, the former Army Green Beret sniper — and sniper instructor — whose life story is chronicled in my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August:

Me: “I went and saw American Sniper today. Did you see it Saturday? Thoughts? I thought it seemed a little too much Hollywood. Am I right?

Stewart:  “Haven’t seen it yet. Gonna wait ’til it’s on DVD.”

Me: “I wish I had saved my money until it was at RedBox instead of wasting big $$ at theater.”

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Click image above to order book.

While Chris Kyle’s exploits are legendary, the film seemed to lack the kind of emotion I expected to see. And, perhaps I’m biased, but I think Stewart’s story would make a better film.

Because another updated Weldon Spring (Mo.) Cancer Report is due to be released by early January 2016, I decided to revisit the subject of radioactive contamination dangers in the St. Louis area. Read about it in my Jan. 30 post, New Weldon Spring Cancer Report Due Out Early 2016.

Gravel-covered stairs lead to the top of the 75-foot-tall disposal cell at the Weldon Spring Site.

Click on image above to read article.

Thanks for stopping by!  Hope you’ll buy my books to ensure my work continues.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Challenger Disaster Recalled 29 Years Later

Twenty-nine years ago today, I was a young Air Force second lieutenant attending the Public Affairs Officer Course at the Defense Information School, then located at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indianapolis. During a break from morning classes, I gathered with a dozen or so of my classmates from the Army, Navy and Marine Corps in front of a breakroom television to watch the Space Shuttle Challenger launch. Back then, shuttle launches were still big events. None of us imagined what would happen before our eyes.

The Challenger crew takes a break during countdown training Jan. 9, 1986, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Left to right are Teacher-in-Space payload specialist Sharon Christa McAuliffe; payload specialist Gregory Jarvis; and astronauts Judith A. Resnik, mission specialist; Francis R. (Dick) Scobee, mission commander; Ronald E. McNair, mission specialist; Mike J. Smith, pilot; and Ellison S. Onizuka, mission specialist. (NASA photo)

The Challenger crew takes a break during countdown training Jan. 9, 1986, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. Left to right are Teacher-in-Space payload specialist Sharon Christa McAuliffe; payload specialist Gregory Jarvis; and astronauts Judith A. Resnik, mission specialist; Francis R. (Dick) Scobee, mission commander; Ronald E. McNair, mission specialist; Mike J. Smith, pilot; and Ellison S. Onizuka, mission specialist. (NASA photo)

Seventy-three seconds after launch, the shuttle exploded in flight high above the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Fla., killing all seven crew members — including the nation’s first teacher in space, Christa McAuliffe.

Later that day, President Ronald Reagan spoke to the nation during a televised address that ended with the following words:

“There’s a coincidence today. On this day 390 years ago, the great explorer Sir Francis Drake died aboard ship off the coast of Panama. In his lifetime the great frontiers were the oceans, and a historian later said, ‘He lived by the sea, died on it, and was buried in it.’ Well, today we can say of the Challenger crew: Their dedication was, like Drake’s, complete.

“The crew of the space shuttle Challenger honored us by the manner in which they lived their lives. We will never forget them, nor the last time we saw them, this morning, as they prepared for their journey and waved good-bye and ’slipped the surly bonds of earth to touch the face of God.’”

It was a day, much like April 19, 1995, and Sept. 11, 2001. Days I will never forget.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Thirty-Six Reasons Why You Should Read The Clapper Memo

Sometimes, people ask me why they should read my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo. For them, I offer the 36 reasons below:

Click image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

1. If you have ever had to submit to a polygraph examination in order to land or keep a job, you should read The Clapper Memo.

2. If you hold a security clearance and are subject to periodic polygraph examinations, you should read The Clapper Memo.

3. If you are now serving in any branch of the Armed Forces of the United States, you should read The Clapper Memo.

4. If you are a veteran who served in any branch of in the Armed Forces of the United States, you should read The Clapper Memo.

5. If you know someone who has served in any branch of the Armed Forces of the United States, you should read The Clapper Memo.

6. If you are considering joining the Armed Forces of the United States, you should read The Clapper Memo.

7. If you have ever been subjected to a polygraph examination as part of a criminal investigation, you should read The Clapper Memo.

8. If you expect to undergo a polygraph examination as part of a criminal investigation, you should read The Clapper Memo.

9. If you know someone who was convicted of a crime based upon the results of a polygraph examination, you should read The Clapper Memo.

10. If you have ever wondered about the validity of the polygraph, you should read The Clapper Memo.

11. If you are interested in learning about countermeasures that enable anyone to beat the polygraph, you should read The Clapper Memo.

12. If you are interested in reading details of what I learned about a non-polygraph credibility assessment technology for which no countermeasures exist, you should read The Clapper Memo.

13. If you are interested in what I learned during my exclusive interview with the man who interrogated Tariq Aziz and other members of Saddam Hussein’s infamous “Deck of Cards,” you should read The Clapper Memo.

14. If you are interested in what I learned during my exclusive interview with the former Army Green Beret who set the record for the most interrogations (500+) of enemy combatants in Iraq, you should read The Clapper Memo.

15. If you are interested in what I learned during my exclusive interview with a man who has used covert interrogation methods to help resolve more than 300 kidnapping cases in Mexico and send 450 criminals to prison, you should read The Clapper Memo.

16. If you are interested in what I learned by reading hundreds of email messages exchanged between top Justice Department officials and the academics they paid to conduct taxpayer-funded studies, you should read The Clapper Memo.

17. If you are interested in understanding one of the root causes of the deadly “Green-on-Blue” attacks against American warfighters in Afghanistan, you should read The Clapper Memo.

18. If you are interested in reading about apparent conflicts of interest and ethical lapses by some of our nation’s top intelligence officials, you should read The Clapper Memo.

The Clapper Memo Info & Endorsements

Click on image above to learn more and read endorsements of the book.

19. If you are interested in reading an example of why ABC News’ Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross has been labeled “America’s Wrongest Reporter,” you should read The Clapper Memo.

20. If you are interested in reading what I learned about how U.S. Government agencies made a mockery out of the Freedom of Information Act during the four years I spent conducting research for my book, you should read The Clapper Memo.

21. If you are interested in reading what I learned about how U.S. Government agencies dole out research dollars in the form of non-competitive grants to academics, you should read The Clapper Memo.

22. If you are interested in learning about a non-polygraph technology that, despite being embraced by more than 1,800 local and state law enforcement agencies is banned for use by Department of Defense personnel, you should read The Clapper Memo.

23. If you are interested in reading about how a top Department of Defense counterintelligence official used his position to promote his private investigation business, you should read The Clapper Memo.

24. If you are interested in reading about a non-polygraph technology proven to accurately detect stress in the human voice, you should read The Clapper Memo.

25. If you are interested in what senior interrogation officials at Guantanamo Bay had to say about the non-polygraph technology that was taken away from them after proving very successful, you should read The Clapper Memo.

26. If you are interested in what several members of our nation’s Special Forces community (i.e., Navy SEALs and Army Green Berets) had to say about the non-polygraph technology that was taken away from them after proving very successful, you should read The Clapper Memo.

27. If you think the United States should use the best technology available to interrogate detainees being held at Guantanamo Bay, you should read The Clapper Memo.

28. If you think the United States should use the best technology available to interrogate enemy combatants, you should read The Clapper Memo.

29. If you think the United States should use the best technology available to interrogate suspected terrorists, you should read The Clapper Memo.

30. If you think the United States should use the best technology available to interrogate criminal suspects, you should read The Clapper Memo.

31. If you think the United States should stop relying upon century-old polygraph technology, you should read The Clapper Memo.

32. If you find it difficult to believe members of the American Polygraph Association are objective in their criticism of non-polygraph technology, you should read The Clapper Memo.

33. If you want to read the bloody details of a technological “turf war” that’s been raging quietly for more than 40 years between backers of the polygraph and those behind competing technologies, you should read The Clapper Memo.

34. If you trust people who put their lives on the line for their fellow citizens more than you trust academics, bureaucrats and politicians, you should read The Clapper Memo.

35. If you appreciate thorough investigative reporting that relies upon one-on-one interviews, thorough research and thousands of documents obtained via the Freedom of Information Act and various state “sunshine” laws, you should read The Clapper Memo.

36. If you want to find out why the face of Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., our nation’s top intelligence official, appears on the cover of this book and why his name appears in the title of this book, you should read The Clapper Memo.

To find out what all of the fuss is about, order a copy of The Clapper Memo today!

UPDATE 4/19/2015 at 1:24 p.m. Central: Check out the limited-time free-books offer here.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

The Uniformed Military Balked at ‘Enhanced Interrogation’ Because They Had Better Option in Now-Banned Technology

The headline above a recent Stars and Stripes article caught my eye, because it included four words — the uniformed military balked — that became familiar to me as I conducted an exhaustive four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of credibility assessment and interrogation technologies.

Click image above to read article.

Click image above to read article.

Those four words reminded me of the memos issued by three top DoD officials in an attempt to remove one interrogation technology from the toolkits of our nation’s top military and intelligence warfighters. Worth repeating is the fact that it took three memos, because most warfighters simply refused to give up the tool after the first two memos were issued in June 2004 and in 2007. In other words, the uniformed military balked. It was only after a third memo was issued in June 2008 that the technology was finally removed from warfighters’ toolkits.

Some of our nation’s top warfighters described their reactions to the memo-backed efforts to take away one of their most-effective interrogation tools.

A former member of the Navy SEALs, who spoke with me on the condition I not reveal his identity, said the second memo, issued by then-Under Secretary of Defense James R. Clapper Jr., was a contributing factor in his decision to retire from the military much earlier than he could have. He went on to say that the people responsible for efforts to remove that technology from the hands of warfighters “should face charges and do time.”

A former Army Green Beret, who used the now-banned technology to conduct some 500 interrogations of enemy combatants and other detainees, spoke with me under the same condition. He told me he “would testify in front of Congress that this piece of equipment is essential for (Human Intelligence) personnel on the ground in Iraq and Afghanistan.  If they want to save lives, they’ve got to put this piece of equipment back into that theater. Every unit should have this equipment.”

Why did members of the uniformed military balk at giving up this particular piece of interrogation technology? Because it works far better than any kind of torture or “enhanced interrogation techniques.”

There’s only one place where you’ll find the details about how well this technology worked with detainees at Guantanamo Bay, on members of Saddam Hussein’s inner circle (a.k.a., “The Deck of Cards”) and on members of al-Qaeda and the Taliban — inside the pages of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo.

Click here to order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click here to read the high-profile endorsements the book has received.

UPDATE 4/19/2015 at 1:25 p.m. Central: Check out the limited-time free-books offer here.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Remember Pearl Harbor — 73rd Anniversary

On this day, the 73rd anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, I share a half-dozen photographs shot Dec. 7, 1941, the “day that will live in infamy.”

Credit for the photos above belongs to the U.S. Navy photographers who shot them as well as the Navy History and Heritage Center Collection and the National Archives collection where they are kept. To see more photos like these, click here.

FYI: I encourage you on this day and every day to thank a veteran for the freedom you enjoy.

If you like this article and my other efforts, please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.