Tag Archives: polygraph exam

Thirty-Six Reasons Why You Should Read The Clapper Memo

Sometimes, people ask me why they should read my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo. For them, I offer the 36 reasons below:

Click image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

1. If you have ever had to submit to a polygraph examination in order to land or keep a job, you should read The Clapper Memo.

2. If you hold a security clearance and are subject to periodic polygraph examinations, you should read The Clapper Memo.

3. If you are now serving in any branch of the Armed Forces of the United States, you should read The Clapper Memo.

4. If you are a veteran who served in any branch of in the Armed Forces of the United States, you should read The Clapper Memo.

5. If you know someone who has served in any branch of the Armed Forces of the United States, you should read The Clapper Memo.

6. If you are considering joining the Armed Forces of the United States, you should read The Clapper Memo.

7. If you have ever been subjected to a polygraph examination as part of a criminal investigation, you should read The Clapper Memo.

8. If you expect to undergo a polygraph examination as part of a criminal investigation, you should read The Clapper Memo.

9. If you know someone who was convicted of a crime based upon the results of a polygraph examination, you should read The Clapper Memo.

10. If you have ever wondered about the validity of the polygraph, you should read The Clapper Memo.

11. If you are interested in learning about countermeasures that enable anyone to beat the polygraph, you should read The Clapper Memo.

12. If you are interested in reading details of what I learned about a non-polygraph credibility assessment technology for which no countermeasures exist, you should read The Clapper Memo.

13. If you are interested in what I learned during my exclusive interview with the man who interrogated Tariq Aziz and other members of Saddam Hussein’s infamous “Deck of Cards,” you should read The Clapper Memo.

14. If you are interested in what I learned during my exclusive interview with the former Army Green Beret who set the record for the most interrogations (500+) of enemy combatants in Iraq, you should read The Clapper Memo.

15. If you are interested in what I learned during my exclusive interview with a man who has used covert interrogation methods to help resolve more than 300 kidnapping cases in Mexico and send 450 criminals to prison, you should read The Clapper Memo.

16. If you are interested in what I learned by reading hundreds of email messages exchanged between top Justice Department officials and the academics they paid to conduct taxpayer-funded studies, you should read The Clapper Memo.

17. If you are interested in understanding one of the root causes of the deadly “Green-on-Blue” attacks against American warfighters in Afghanistan, you should read The Clapper Memo.

18. If you are interested in reading about apparent conflicts of interest and ethical lapses by some of our nation’s top intelligence officials, you should read The Clapper Memo.

The Clapper Memo Info & Endorsements

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19. If you are interested in reading an example of why ABC News’ Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross has been labeled “America’s Wrongest Reporter,” you should read The Clapper Memo.

20. If you are interested in reading what I learned about how U.S. Government agencies made a mockery out of the Freedom of Information Act during the four years I spent conducting research for my book, you should read The Clapper Memo.

21. If you are interested in reading what I learned about how U.S. Government agencies dole out research dollars in the form of non-competitive grants to academics, you should read The Clapper Memo.

22. If you are interested in learning about a non-polygraph technology that, despite being embraced by more than 1,800 local and state law enforcement agencies is banned for use by Department of Defense personnel, you should read The Clapper Memo.

23. If you are interested in reading about how a top Department of Defense counterintelligence official used his position to promote his private investigation business, you should read The Clapper Memo.

24. If you are interested in reading about a non-polygraph technology proven to accurately detect stress in the human voice, you should read The Clapper Memo.

25. If you are interested in what senior interrogation officials at Guantanamo Bay had to say about the non-polygraph technology that was taken away from them after proving very successful, you should read The Clapper Memo.

26. If you are interested in what several members of our nation’s Special Forces community (i.e., Navy SEALs and Army Green Berets) had to say about the non-polygraph technology that was taken away from them after proving very successful, you should read The Clapper Memo.

27. If you think the United States should use the best technology available to interrogate detainees being held at Guantanamo Bay, you should read The Clapper Memo.

28. If you think the United States should use the best technology available to interrogate enemy combatants, you should read The Clapper Memo.

29. If you think the United States should use the best technology available to interrogate suspected terrorists, you should read The Clapper Memo.

30. If you think the United States should use the best technology available to interrogate criminal suspects, you should read The Clapper Memo.

31. If you think the United States should stop relying upon century-old polygraph technology, you should read The Clapper Memo.

32. If you find it difficult to believe members of the American Polygraph Association are objective in their criticism of non-polygraph technology, you should read The Clapper Memo.

33. If you want to read the bloody details of a technological “turf war” that’s been raging quietly for more than 40 years between backers of the polygraph and those behind competing technologies, you should read The Clapper Memo.

34. If you trust people who put their lives on the line for their fellow citizens more than you trust academics, bureaucrats and politicians, you should read The Clapper Memo.

35. If you appreciate thorough investigative reporting that relies upon one-on-one interviews, thorough research and thousands of documents obtained via the Freedom of Information Act and various state “sunshine” laws, you should read The Clapper Memo.

36. If you want to find out why the face of Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr., our nation’s top intelligence official, appears on the cover of this book and why his name appears in the title of this book, you should read The Clapper Memo.

To find out what all of the fuss is about, order a copy of The Clapper Memo today!

UPDATE 4/19/2015 at 1:24 p.m. Central: Check out the limited-time free-books offer here.

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Click on image above to order Bob's books.

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Test Your Skills in ‘Can You Spot the Liar?’

Over the weekend, I came across a New York Times piece, Can You Spot the Liar?  Though more than six months old, this interactive piece remains relevant and interesting.

Click image above to link to "Can You Spot the Liar?"

Click image above to link to “Can You Spot the Liar?”

The Times offered this description of how to play:

Poker players might call it the “tell” — it’s the idea that your body language tells your questioners if the words you’re saying are actually true or false. These subjects in a University of Chicago study on body language and lying were asked several general questions — and then told off camera to lie or tell the truth when answering. Can you tell truth from falsehood?

After watching videos of ten individuals, each answering a single question after being told in advance how they should respond, I was able to determine whether or not the person was lying or not lying six out of ten times.

Was I surprised when I answered correctly 60 percent of the time and was, in effect, more accurate than the typical polygraph exam? Not at all. As an investigative journalist who spent most of four years investigating the use of credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, I learned a lot about success rates and scams.

The results of my investigation, including many never-before-published details, appear inside my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo. To read about them, order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Second Man Indicted for Teaching How to Beat Polygraph

Despite unwavering claims by polygraph loyalists that countermeasures don’t work against their century-old credibility assessment technology, federal agents continue to indict and/or arrest Americans for the “crime” of teaching people how to employ countermeasures during polygraph exams.

Polygraph Exam

Doug Williams, 69, is a former Oklahoma City law enforcement officer and owner of Polygraph.com who, according to a Department of Justice news release issued late Friday, has been indicted on obstruction of justice and mail fraud charges. The Norman, Okla., man’s alleged crime? Training customers to lie and conceal crimes during polygraph examinations.

Williams’ arrest comes almost 14 months after Chad Dixon of Marion, Ind, was sentenced to eight months in prison after pleading guilty to similar charges.

Having spent much of four years conducting an exhaustive investigation of the federal government’s use of credibility assessment technologies, I’m convinced DoJ officials have gone to great lengths to paint Williams and Dixon as evil criminals and, by doing so, are sending a clear message to anyone thinking about making a living by exposing the shortcomings of the polygraph:  “Stop now or expect to face the wrath of federal prosecutors.” At the same time, they’re admitting that the polygraph (a.k.a., “the federal government bureaucracy’s credibility assessment technology of choice”) cannot stand on its own merits.

To learn more about polygraph countermeasures and about a 40-year “turf war” that’s been raging silently between polygraph loyalists and those behind more effective and reliable credibility assessment technologies, read The Clapper Memo. After you do, you’ll likely find yourself in agreement with the people whose endorsements appear at the bottom of this page.

BETTER-LATE-THAN-NEVER UPDATE 10/8/2015 at 6:27 p.m. Central: On Sept. 22, according to this report, a federal judge in Oklahoma City sentenced Williams to two years in prison for training people to deceive during polygraph tests. Apparently having few options, Williams pleaded guilty in May to two counts of mail fraud and three counts of witness tampering.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Award-Winning Polygraph Examiner Blowing Smoke

After reading what Fort Bend County (Texas) Sheriff’s Office Lt. James Fontenot allegedly told a reporter about polygraph countermeasures, I’d love to hear the veteran polygraph examiner explain why the Customs and Border Patrol arrested Chad Dixon for teaching people polygraph countermeasures. In other words, I think he’s blowing smoke.

Polygraph Exam

“I have never met anyone who I felt could beat the polygraph. That stuff online on how to beat a polygraph test does NOT work, these behaviors are easily recognized by a polygraph examiner,” said Lieutenant Fontenot, a man who, according to a Houston Chronicle article published today, recently received the Tim Kennedy Examiner of the Year Award presented by the Texas Association of Law Enforcement Polygraph Investigators for 2014, the top honor for polygraph examiners in the state.

In case you missed it, 34-year-old Dixon was uprooted from his life in Marion, Ind., and sentenced in September 2013 to eight months in prison for teaching polygraph countermeasures Lieutenant Fontenot — a man described as having conduct some 3,000 polygraph examinations — claims do not work.

Why am I so interested in the statement made by this Houston-area polygraph examiner?  Because I conducted an extensive four-year investigation of credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, and reveal what I uncovered in my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo. And, trust me, what you see on television and in the movies about polygraph exams is chock full of holes.

To learn more about The Clapper Memo, read other posts about the book.

To understand everything I’ve uncovered about the polygraph and its competitors, order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

CORRECTION: In the original version of this article, I incorrectly listed the FBI instead of CBP as the arresting agency.

Nation’s Top Intelligence Official Blowing Smoke When It Comes to Plan for Tightening Security Clearance Process

I got more than I bargained for when I read the Federal News Radio article, Social media could become part of security clearance process. I learned that Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. is moving forward with a system of continuous evaluation of security clearance holders and has no plans to forgo current tools, including interviews, polygraphs and reference checks.

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Click on graphic above to order book.

That news was delivered by National Counterintelligence Executive Bill Evanina, the policies expert inside the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, during a recent interview with FNR’s Emily Kopp. But that wasn’t all he shared.

According to the article, he said he expects DNI Clapper to launch the continuous evaluation system early next year, starting with top-secret clearance holders and eventually involving all five million clearance holders.

I can’t wait to see if DNI Clapper can pull it off, because the numbers, as I reported in my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, are against him.

According to a DoD report I cite in the book, polygraph examiners throughout the entire federal government conducted approximately 8,000 polygraph exams between Oct. 1, 1999, and Sept. 30, 2000. Then, almost one year later, the history-changing attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, took place. During the 10 years that followed those attacks, the number of polygraph exams conducted within the federal government skyrocketed. According to an Under Secretary of Defense (Intelligence) report I cite in the book, DoD polygraph examiners alone conducted more than 43,000 polygraph exams during the 12-month period ending April 30, 2011.

It took DNI Clapper’s folks ten years to ramp up their polygraph program from 8,000 to 43,000 annual exams. How he expects to ramp up to five million exams is beyond anyone’s comprehension. And how he expects to achieve worthwhile results with the polygraph, the same century-old technology that convicted spies such as John Anthony Walker Jr., Jonathan Jay Pollard, Ana Belen Montes, and other U.S. government employees subject to periodic polygraph exams as conditions of their employment to get away with their crimes. Some spied for years and years before being caught! And don’t forget Edward Snowden, the most recent example of an intelligence professional with a high-level security clearance to make reliance on the polygraph appear foolish.

See also: Intel Boss ‘Truly Insane,’ According to Former CIA Director

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To understand everything I’ve uncovered in the book, order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

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