Tag Archives: Quantico

Afghans in USA Missing After Vetting Process Fails Again

This morning, I came across a recent CBS News article about the disappearance of two Afghans who were in the United States to receive specialized training from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Based on what I learned during a four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph, I believe Americans have reason to be concerned about these men.

Left to right: Mohd Naweed Samimi and Mohammad Yasin Ataye.

Left to right: Mohd Naweed Samimi and Mohammad Yasin Ataye.

Alarm bells began ringing in my mind after I read that, according to a DEA spokesperson cited in the article, Mohammad Yasin Ataye, 22, and Mohd Naweed Samimi, 24, were part of a group of 31 Afghan police officers participating in an intensive five-week training program to combat drug trafficking in Quantico, Va. Why? Because I learned long ago about the vetting process used to screen Afghans seeking positions with Afghan military, police and security agencies. It has worked so well that, during the seven years since Defense Department officials began keeping records of such attacks, 144 coalition members — mostly Americans — have been killed and 183 have been wounded [source] by supposedly-vetted individuals committing so-called “Green-on-Blue” attacks.

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Click on image above to order book.

Alarm bells continued to sound off after I read the first sentence of the article’s fourth paragraph:  According to the DEA, each candidate is extensively vetted and polygraphed. A long line of Americans whose initial and continuing employment with federal government agencies (CIA, FBI, NSA et al) were subject to passing periodic polygraph examinations went on to be convicted of espionage against the United States. Most recently, Edward Snowden made the news for allegedly leaking a plethora of highly-classified intelligence data after passing polygraph exams.

To learn more about why I’m troubled by the disappearance of these Afghans, read The Clapper Memo. My second nonfiction book, it features never-before-published details obtained from top government officials, including individuals who interrogated members of Saddam Hussein‘s inner circle (i.e., “Deck of Cards”) and detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Plus, it has received rave reviews from some high-profile individuals.

To read other posts about The Clapper Memo, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Special Forces Soldier Recalls Unusual Experience With TSA

In a previous post, I shared details about what Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart experienced upon his arrival at the U.S. Military Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kan.  In this post, I share the former Green Beret’s recollections about an experience he had with Transportation Security Administration officials during a trip he took as a prisoner traveling under heavy security escort on a commercial passenger jet from Washington, D.C., to Kansas City.

Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart

Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart

Around 10 o’clock that morning, Stewart’s handlers asked if he was hungry.  He told them he was, and they got him some food.

A short time later, a TSA officer appeared and told Stewart they would take him to the search point, search him and then load him aboard the aircraft before everyone else boarded.  He thought things were looking up, but was wrong.

“They wheeled me out, and we get up there to the security checkpoint,” Stewart said.  “Of course, the TSA people there clearly weren’t briefed.

“They were like, ‘Well, we’ve gotta wand him,’” Stewart recalled.  “Now, think about wanding someone who has two sets of metal handcuffs on.  How do you do that?”

Recalling that he had to stand up in his hospital gown, Stewart vividly remembers all of the people in the airport passing by, seeing these people in uniforms and saying, “Thank you for your service.  Thank you for your service.”

“And here I am, standing in double-handcuffs and hospital clothes with a Chuck Norris beard, and they’re just scared of me,” Stewart said, adding that he felt bad because he knew the scene probably frightened some people, especially little kids, at the airport.

Before boarding his flight, the TSA folks told his handlers they needed to see if Stewart had any bombs on him.  They proceeded to swab the soles of his feet and the palms of his hands until they were confident he had not somehow smuggled a bomb out of his prison cell at Quantico and transported it to the airport while double-handcuffed and under escort.

The recollections above represent a sampling of what you’ll find inside Three Days In August, a book in which Stewart’s life and battle with the military justice system are chronicled. To learn more about Stewart’s story, order a copy of Three Days In August.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.