Tag Archives: Special Forces

CURTAIN CALL: Report Marks End of 10-Year Online Journey; Books Remain on Sale at Amazon With More to Follow

In contrast to my 2014 year-in-review piece in which I lamented the disappearance of more than 5,000 articles written and published on my site since October 2006, I’m sharing no news this year about suspected cyberattacks and other forms of online skulduggery. Instead, after writing and publishing more than 300 additional articles during the past 18 months, it’s time to say goodbye. Yes, this is the final curtain call on my 10-year career as an online purveyor of opinions, investigative reports and an occasional dose of humor.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Why the curtain call? Because I recently accepted a position with a Fortune 500 company and, due to time constraints, am no longer able to continue this endeavor. I must say, however, that it’s been an interesting ride since the days when my website was known as “BMW: The Ultimate Blogging Machine” and ranked #82 among the world’s Top 100 Conservative Blogs.

Original caricature by David Donar.

My cartoonist friend, David Donar, drew this for my use as the “Ultimate Blogging Machine.”

As the virtual fabric of this curtain call, I’d like to challenge other journalists — including those “citizen” journalists so often looked down upon by many of my college journalism-school brethren — to pick up the torch and keep the sunlight of disinfectant shining on a handful of topics (below) that deserve continued attention:

• THE PENTAGON’S SEXUAL ASSAULT WITCH HUNT

Click on graphic above to order a copy of Three Days In August by Bob McCarty.

Click on graphic above to order a copy of Three Days In August by Bob McCarty.

Since the October 2011 release of my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August: A U.S. Special Forces Soldier’s Fight For Military Justice, I’ve been contacted by hundreds of individuals in search of help after they or a loved one found themselves falsely accused of crimes — usually involving members of the opposite sex — and, too often, convicted of those crimes in the military justice system. The case I’ve followed most closely since late August involves Army Maj. Christian “Kit” Martin and will be, if I can possibly make it happen, the subject of my next book. It’s a big “IF” due to the career change, but I hope to make it happen nonetheless. My 49-minute Skype interview with Major Martin offers an overview of the people and allegations involved in this case prior to multiple dead bodies being discovered only a week ahead of the date on which the major’s court-martial was set to begin. It has now been pushed back to an as-yet-undetermined date in March 2016.

• INTERROGATION TECHNOLOGY

Click on image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo by Bob McCarty.

Click on image above to order a copy of The Clapper Memo by Bob McCarty.

In April 2008, I wrote a short piece about the Pentagon’s plan to deploy portable polygraph technology to war zones, purportedly for use in interrogating terror suspects and others whose information might be valuable to our war effort. Twelve months later, I asked Pentagon officials a handful of questions about how well the portable polygraphs had worked during their first year of use. Unsatisfied with the answers I received which seemed to indicate the portable polygraph technology had failed miserably, I launched an investigation that would last more than four years and result in learning about an extremely accurate and effective interrogation technology that Department of Defense leaders had yanked from the “toolkits” of our warfighters.

Along the way, I interviewed men who had used that technology with much success. Among them, Defense Intelligence Agency contractors who interrogated members of Saddam Hussein’s “Deck of Cards” as well as al-Qaeda and Taliban terror suspects and Army Green Berets and Navy SEALs who had used that technology with much success on the battlefield. In addition, I obtained never-before-published copies of letters and reports written by men who had used that technology with much success to interrogate detainees at Guantanamo Bay during the early days of the Global War On Terror. In May 2013, I shared the results of my investigation in the form of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo.

• The Oklahoma City Bombing Trial in Salt Lake City

Though many Americans don’t even realize it’s taking place, I’ve been writing about an Oklahoma City Bombing trial that’s been slogging its way through a federal court in Salt Lake City as part of a 19-year (so far) search for the truth. My most recent piece about the trial appeared under the July 1 headline, Pre-Blast Videotapes FBI Claims ‘Might Have Been Misfiled’ Remain at Center of Ongoing Oklahoma City Bombing Trial. Other recent pieces covered topics such as allegations of FBI witness tampering and the judge’s threat to slap FBI agents with contempt of court charges. In the interest of time and understanding what’s at stake, I recommend you watch this chilling one-hour video before you read my other posts about the Oklahoma City Bombing Trial.

Radiation Contamination in the St. Louis Area

In January 2012, I wrote my first report about radioactive waste issues in the St. Louis area. It had to do with a report about cancer concerns related to the Weldon Spring Site in St. Charles County, Mo., the county just west and northwest of St. Louis County (Mo.). Three years later, I offered an update under the headline, New Weldon Spring Cancer Report Due Out Early 2016. Sadly, state health department officials have refused to provide answers to my latest queries. As a result, the final word remains to be written on this subject.

There are, of course, many more topics I’d like to highlight, but I’ll let you peruse them via the drop-down menu of categories located just below the “SEARCH” block in the right sidebar.

Before closing, allow me to suggest you show any appreciation you might have for my decade of work by purchasing copies of my books as Christmas gifts for the readers in your life:

• Chronicling the life story and wrongful prosecution of an elite Army Green Beret, Three Days In August received endorsements from Pamela Gellar of Atlas Shrugs and Richard Miniter, New York Times’ best selling author and investigative reporter. For more details about the book, visit http://ThreeDaysInAugust.com.

• To read the list of high-power endorsements of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, visit http://TheClapperMemo.com.

Click on image above to order book.

Click on image above to order book.

• For pure entertainment value, I recommend you read about FBI Special Agent Joseph L. Wilson and his effort to solve the mystery behind the deaths of thousands of Americans during the Fourth of July weekend. The biggest challenge of his law enforcement career, the investigation becomes personal after Wilson realizes he shares one thing in common with those who died: The National Bet.

To learn how to order signed copies, click here.

Thanks for everything and Merry Christmas to you and yours! It’s been a great ride!

FYI: Because I might write a few more pieces before the end of the year, I’ll leave this as a “Featured Post” until then. And, oh yes, I will keep posting occasional thoughts on my Facebook page.

My Answer Hasn’t Changed After Four Years

Almost every time I give a media interview about my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August: A U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier’s Fight For Military Justice, I’m asked why I wrote it. My answer goes something like this: “I believe Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart, the man whose life is chronicled in the book, deserves a new trial.” Then I explain why.

SFC Kelly A. Stewart (Army) and CMSgt. John Stewart (USAF Ret.)

SFC Kelly A. Stewart (Army) and CMSgt. John Stewart (USAF Ret.)

Below is the long version of my explanation that I wrote down and published in November 2011, one month after Three Days In August was released. It’s the explanation I still offer today:

On March 30, 2010, I came across something about the case of SFC Stewart, a Green Beret who had been convicted and sentenced to eight years in prison after being accused of raping and kidnapping a German woman.

Though I cannot recall or locate whatever it was exactly that made me aware of SFC Stewart’s case, I did keep records of what transpired from that day forward. It began with an email to the Soldier’s father, CMSgt. John Stewart (USAF Ret.), in which I wrote two words: Call me.

During the days and weeks that followed, Chief Stewart forwarded everything he could about the case. In addition, he helped me secure an authenticated copy of the Record of Trial and encouraged me to read it. If, after reading the complete ROT, I didn’t think something had gone horribly wrong with SFC Stewart’s case, Chief Stewart said he would respect my decision.

It didn’t take long, however, for me to conclude that SFC Stewart had indeed become a victim of military justice gone awry.

During the next 12 months, I gathered other documentation, discussed the case with others with close ties to the case and wrote as much as I could write based upon the case records. Then my work on the book took a completely different turn.

On March 31, 2011, SFC Stewart was released from the U.S. Military Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., the result of having his sentence reduced to three years and being released on probation after serving 19 months behind bars.

Soon after his release, I was talking with him by phone.

Before it was over, I had interviewed him multiple times, spending more than a dozen hours on the phone and exchanging countless emails — as the only writer, reporter or media person with whom he agreed to discuss the case.

The rest is history.

Based on extensive interviews and offering never-before-published details about the case, Three Days In August paints a portrait of military justice gone awry that’s certain to make your blood boil.

You can learn more about the book and read its endorsements at ThreeDaysInAugust.com. Likewise, you can order a copy by clicking here or on the graphic below.

To read about other military justice cases I’ve followed, click here.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Bob McCarty Weekly Recap: Nov. 8-14, 2015

The past week was full of news about a multitude of events in which many of the participants attached themselves to their own definition of justice. In my weekly recap below, I offer a review of those events and how I followed them Nov. 8-14, 2015.

Mizzou Bowl-Eligible?

If resignations count as victories, does that mean the Missouri Tigers are bowl-eligible? Click on image above to read about political correctness on campus.

Sunday, Nov. 8

On my website, BobMcCarty.com, I shared nothing new. I did, however, share a few things on my Facebook page.

The week began with good news and bad news, depending upon who your favorite college football team is. For me, good news surfaced when my two favorite football teams, Oklahoma State and Oklahoma in that order, were ranked #8 and #12, respectively, in the college football playoff rankings for Week 11. For many of my neighbors, bad news surfaced when football players at the University of Missouri went on strike and prompted me — and many others in cyberspace — to ask, “Haven’t the Missouri Tigers been on strike all season? Ahem, 4-5?”

I also shared a few political points, including one aimed at Eric Greitens, a former Navy SEAL and Rhodes Scholar who’s running for governor as a Democrat Republican in Missouri. It seems he not only aligns with Al Gore and other liberals in promoting climate change propaganda, but he’s also a big fan of global governance. As a result, I’m siding with a trustworthy Marine, John Brunner, to be the Show-Me State’s next Republican governor.

On a more personal note, Sunday marked Day 100 of the fitness regimen I started Aug. 1, and I reported the loss of 17 pounds toward my goal of 30 that will bring me to the “ultimate fighting weight” at which I graduated from Air Force Officer Training School more than 30 years ago.

Monday, Nov. 9

My first article of the week appeared Monday under the headline, GREEN BERET: ‘The next thing you know, it felt like someone put lighter fluid on me and caught me on fire.’ An excerpt from my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August, it casts a light on details of an Army Special Forces Soldier’s brush with death following his conviction on bogus sexual assault charges.

Kelly Stewart returns from a mission in Iraq.

Kelly Stewart returns from a mission in Iraq.

Among the day’s updates on my Facebook page, I pointed to news about a Jordanian policeman waging an “insider attack” that killed two Americans as a stark reminder of some of the subject matter I covered in my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo. In addition, I dubbed The University of Missouri at Columbia “Ferguson West” as protests continued at the school with the football team that’s 4-5.

I also wondered, after reading an article about the Pentagon retracting a report on male-on-male sexual trauma, how long it will take before Defense Department leaders come clean and bring an end to the Pentagon’s insane efforts to convict men on sexual assault charges regardless of whether such assaults took place.

Tuesday, Nov. 10

My second article appeared Tuesday under the headline, Something’s Seriously Wrong When Military Justice System Sides With Psychics, Convicted Felons and Porn Queens. In it, I pointed readers to details about three cases that began with sexual assault allegations made against military men by three unique women: a self-described psychic, a convicted felon and a convicted felon. I couldn’t make this stuff up if I tried!

My third article appeared under the headline, Someone Else at Mizzou Should Resign or Be Fired ASAP, and actually produced results, though I’m not about to claim full credit.

Among the day’s updates on my Facebook page was one that featured a list of questions that came to mind after I read an article in The New York Times about the protests at Mizzou:

• What will happen when a journalist calls the campus police at the University of Missouri at Columbia to report students are trampling upon his freedom of the press?

• Will the campus police come to the aide of the journalist?

• What if the police don’t come to the aide of the journalist? That will make for some interesting reporting. It will also lead to some interesting explanations by the campus police.

• How long will it take for Reverend Al Sharpton and his gang of race hustlers to arrive on campus and begin stoking the fires of discontent?

• MOST IMPORTANT: Will Mizzou football fans stage a mass boycott of the team’s next home game or will it simply look as if they have taken the drastic step when so many stadium seats appear empty as the Tigers trudge through another forgettable season? So many questions. So little time.

Also on Facebook Tuesday, I managed to photograph members of an anarchist group appearing to break the law at my favorite St. Louis-area lake, and I asked a tongue-in-cheek question: Does notching two same-day victories (i.e., getting both the university system president and the chancellor to resign their positions), make the previously 4-5 University of Missouri Tigers football team bowl eligible? Inquiring minds want to know.

Wednesday, Nov. 11

On Veterans Day, I shared my fourth article under the headline, WW II Soldier About Brothers: ‘We All Came Home Alive!’ The piece includes some of my father’s reflections about his personal experiences during World War II.

Click on the image above to read my pieces about Veterans Day.

Click on the image above of my dad in his World War II Army uniform to read my pieces about Veterans Day.

I also shared two related pieces, Story of Four Not-So-Famous Brothers Inspires and V-MAIL: World War II Soldier Writes to Parents Back Home, on my Facebook page Wednesday.

And there was more:

• Related to the student protests at Mizzou, I shared a link to the abstract of the doctoral dissertation, “It’s ‘a good thing’: The commodification of femininity, affluence, and whiteness in the Martha Stewart phenomenon,” completed by Dr. Melissa Click at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst six years before she made headlines for all the wrong reasons at Mizzou;

• I observed how the folks at the state’s largest university had scheduled Mizzou Transgender Day of Remembrance on Veterans Day; and

• I reminded folks of how at least four Republican hopefuls are ineligible to serve as president, according to a man I trust who served twice as a member of the Electoral College.

Thursday, Nov. 12

My fifth article of the week, published Thursday, was more crass commercial message than news, because I asked people to do two things: 1) buy my books; and, afterward, 2) copy Steve Jennings’ example and send me photos of themselves holding copies of my books. Soon after, Ivan Nikolov took the bull by the horns and sent me a photo of himself holding up his copy of The Clapper Memo. Thanks, friend!

Facebook friend Ivan Nikolov holds a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Facebook friend Ivan Nikolov holds a copy of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo.

On my Facebook page Thursday, I shared an excerpt from my first crime-fiction novel, The National Bet, after teasing it with the question, “Ever imagine how horrible it would be if President Obama hijacked your retirement savings?” I also mentioned speaking to an Air Force officer who found himself in the midst of the sexual assault scandal at the Air Force’s Basic Military Training Program and is working on a book about it that I can’t wait to read.

Finally, I shared a priceless video (above) that features Fox Business Channel‘s Neil Cavuto interviewing Keely Mullen, Million Student March National Organizer, about her group’s demand that rich people pay for everyone else’s college costs, that all student loan debt is cancelled and that the minimum wage be raised to $15 an hour for workers on college campuses. After watching it, you’ll understand why I prefaced it with the comment, “I thought I heard the wind whistling through her head, ear to ear, as she spoke.”

Friday, Nov. 13

On Friday, my final article of the week offered another excerpt from my book, Three Days In August. Appearing under the headline, TDIA Book Excerpt: ‘I Wasn’t Going To Be That Dog,’ it is much like the excerpt I shared Monday’ except for that it describes what went through the mind of the elite Green Beret, whose life is the subject of the book, after he was railroaded by the politically-correct military justice system.

Among the items on my Facebook page Friday, I saluted a Medal of Honor recipient, noted the announcement about Gary Pinkel’s plan to retire as the U of Missouri’s football coach (more bad news for Tigers fans) and commented on a variety of other matters, the most important among them being the terror attacks in Paris.

Another five-star review of Three Days In August appeared on Amazon Friday, but I didn’t come across it until today; hence, this is the first mention I’ve made of it. Regardless, the review (below) is a good one and appears to have been written by an attorney:

I had a court-martial at Fort Benning where the Military Judge was the same judge who was presided over US v. Stewart. Both my client and I bought this book to obtain some G-2 on him. It is a really quick read and an informative look on the evolution of military justice in regards to sexual assault prosecutions, which has only grown worse. Bob McCarty has a keen knack for writing about military justice, and this book is by no means dull, particularly if you are a military justice practitioner, or you would like some insight to what it’s like to be sitting in a chair next to your TDS counsel if you are thrown into the military justice machine.

FYI: TDS is the Army acronym for Trial Defense Services (i.e., uniform-wearing defense attorneys).

Thanks in advance for reading and sharing the articles above and those to follow. For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter. Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same. To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Until next time.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

TDIA Book Excerpt: ‘I Wasn’t Going To Be That Dog’

Despite the fact prosecutors presented no evidence or eyewitnesses, members of a U.S. Army court-martial panel found Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart guilty of sexually assaulting a 29-year-old German woman with whom he admitted having had a one-night stand one year earlier. Below is an excerpt from my book, Three Days In August, about what happened in the life of this elite Green Beret after he was railroaded by the politically-correct military justice system:

Click on image above to order book.

Click on image above to order book.

“So, they find me guilty. It’s late at night. In an instant, my whole life got flushed right down the toilet,” said Stewart, recalling the verdict that changed his life just before midnight on August 19, 2009. “I am smart enough to know that my life is screwed. The rest of my life.  No matter what. My life is done.

“Clearly, I felt that I was shafted, and I knew there was no way to fix it,” he explained. “This is an analogy I use. It might come across as messed up, but this is my analogy, and this is why I chose to do what I did.

“I was not going to have everybody do prison time with me,” said Stewart, recalling his thoughts after a court-martial panel found him guilty of sex crimes against a German woman and handed down a sentence that included a reduction in rank, from E-7 to E-1, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, eight years of confinement and a recommendation for dishonorable discharge upon release.

“I wasn’t going to go to prison and have my kids have to go through having their dad in prison and my wife having to stand by my side and go without a husband for years—and, at that time, I didn’t know the length of the years,” said Stewart, a Special Forces combat medic and Level One-trained sniper. “I didn’t know the length of my sentence; I just knew that I was found guilty.”

Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart's uniform was covered with signs of his life as a Top One Percent Special Forces Soldier. Click on image above to order book.

Kelly A. Stewart’s uniform was covered with signs of his life as a Top One Percent Special Forces Soldier.

That’s when he made a decision.

“I never thought I was going to prison,” Stewart said. “When I got back after (being convicted), I had a reality check in the hotel room” at the Krystal Inn, the on-post hotel where he was staying near the court building where his trial was taking place at Rose Barracks in Vilseck, Germany.

About the only plans he made took place during the last intermission in the courtroom before his guilty verdict was announced. After calling his wife and telling her he wouldn’t be coming home soon, Stewart also called his military-friendly bank, USAA, and transferred all of the money in his account into his wife’s account.

“I already knew what I was gonna do,” he recalled.

Back in their room at the Krystal Inn, Stewart and his buddy, Sergeant First Class Detrick Hampton, laid in their beds and talked most of the night until Sergeant Hampton fell asleep around 5 a.m. Less than an hour later, Stewart began to implement his hastily-crafted plan.

Careful not to wake Sergeant Hampton, Stewart got up out of his bed about an hour later, put on his Army Combat Uniform and low-quarter shoes and collected a few items—including a combat knife and a rubber band—he thought he might need. Oddly, he left his black Army jump boots in the room.

Kelly Stewart on a gun truck in Iraq.

Kelly Stewart on a gun truck in Iraq.

Quietly, he walked out of his second-floor room at the Krystal Inn where, even after he was found guilty, he was not kept under guard—an indication, perhaps, that some in the Army still didn’t think he was as dangerous as the charges, eventual conviction and news media coverage of his case might have indicated. He had, after all, never been deemed a danger to others or a flight risk.

Because he had not planned to go away for a long time, Stewart didn’t prepare by gathering lots of clothes, money and 16 passports. Instead, he ensured only that he had enough money for gas to go where he needed to go to take his own life. And with three combat tours in Iraq and other stints in Kosovo and Macedonia under his belt, he knew enough about medicine to make it happen.

Once outside the hotel room, Stewart walked the short distance to a staircase in the center of the building, down a single flight of stairs and through an open-air hallway out to the parking lot where his rental car, an Audi Q5, was parked.

He drove the SUV a short distance to the Shoppette—the name the Army and Air Force Exchange Service gives its convenience stores located on military installations—where he purchased a laundry list of items:  three 50-count bottles of Tylenol caplets, one 72-count package of Sominex tablets, two 16-ounce bottles of Gatorade Riptide Rush, some writing paper and a couple of pencils.”

Find out what happened next in the life of this man who sacrificed so much for his country only to be betrayed! Order a copy of Three Days In August.

To read other articles about the the wrongful prosecution of Sergeant Stewart, including one about a post-trial statement that should have netted him a new trial, click here.

To read about other cases of military justice run amok, click here.

For links to other articles of interest as well as photos and commentary, join me on Facebook and Twitter.  Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here. Thanks in advance!

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Something’s Seriously Wrong When Military Justice System Sides With Psychics, Convicted Felons and Porn Queens

I’ve written many articles about cases involving military men falsely accused and, in many cases, wrongly convicted, of sexual assault. Today, however, I’m going to point you, my readers, to three cases that began with sexual assault allegations made against military men by three unique women: a psychic, a porn queen and a convicted felon.

Former Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart in Iraq.

Former Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart in Iraq. To read his story, order a copy of Three Days In August by clicking on the image above.

The first case involves similar allegations made against Air Force MSgt. Michael Silva. According to one news account, Silva’s case was the oldest yet in a scandal at Lackland AFB in San Antonio that saw 35 Basic Military Training instructors investigated for misconduct with 68 recruits and technical training students over a four-year period. His accuser is a woman who described herself as a “psychic medium” in a series of Twitter postings in October 2009. Interestingly, she made her allegations against Silva, a former BMT instructor at the base, a whopping 17 years after she had spent only three days as an Air Force trainee in his squadron. It was her claim about being a psychic that prompted me to ask the tongue-in-cheek question about this so-called psychic: “Shouldn’t she have known in advance if she was about to become the victim of a horrible crime?

You can read more about his case in a piece that appears under the headline, Social Media Postings Reveal Much About ‘Psychic Medium’ Who Accused AF Basic Training Instructor of Sexual Assault. To read other pieces about Silva’s case, which is under appeal at this time, click here.

Silva-Martin Coverage

The second case involves sexual assault allegations made against Army Maj. Christian “Kit” Martin by the woman to whom he thought he had been legally married. Only weeks before his military trial was set to begin at Fort Campbell, Ky., he learned the woman had entered a guilty plea before a Christian County (Ky.) judge on a felony charge of bigamy. In other words, she had admitted to having married Major Martin without telling him she was still married to another man. Despite the fact that Major Martin’s accuser and former “spouse” is a convicted felon and, due to the nature of the crime, a person who has lived many years under a cloud of falsehoods, the Army seems bent on following through with this career Army officer’s military trial at which he faces the possibility of a very long prison sentence if found guilty.

For a fairly-comprehensive look at this case through the end of September, read Thirty Days of Hell in the Life of an Accused Army Officer. To read other pieces about the case, click here.

The third case involves sexual assault allegations made against another military man — who I’m not yet ready to identify — by a woman who is now his ex-wife. Interestingly, his accuser turned into an entrepreneur of sorts soon after her husband was convicted and sentenced to prison. Her business? Adult entertainment. Though it’s difficult to understand the exact nature of what appears to be her multi-faceted business, I believe “wannabe porn queen” describes her well. Why? Because this moderately-attractive woman has, on her websites and social media pages, posted a plethora of photographs in which she is shown posing naked and semi-naked. One photo even shows her face situated only inches away from a man’s genitalia.

Though I’m waiting to collect a few more items before I break this story in full, I can point you to a letter written by a woman who is well-informed about the case. It appears under the headline, Wife Offers Details About Wrongly-Accused Husband’s Case.

The military justice cases highlighted above have caused me much concern, and they should be of immediate concern to all Americans who care about those who serve in uniform. Political correctness is killing our people and our readiness. Needless to say, I’ll continue to follow them and keep you apprised of new developments as they occur.

To read about my most-comprehensive investigation to date of a case of false sexual assault allegations, order a copy of Three Days In August. In this, my first nonfiction book, I chronicle the life story and wrongful conviction of a highly-decorated Army Special Forces Soldier and combat veteran who, as a Green Beret medic and Level 1 sniper, received one Bronze Star Medal, though he really earned two.

Show your support and help keep these articles coming by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same. To learn how to order signed copies, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.