Tag Archives: spying

Could Online Dating Site Help USA Wage War on Terror?

EDITOR’S NOTE:  With Islamic terrorism still a hot-button issue and stories surfacing about Western teenage girls wanting to join Islamic terror groups, I thought I’d lighten the mood and share some humor below that I shared for the first time in a post seven years ago this month. Enjoy!

Click image above to read story.

Click image above to read story.

Today, I read an article which stirred in me an idea that might lead to greater success in waging the War on Terror. After sharing this idea online, I fully intend to share it with intelligence officials in Washington, D.C.

The article chronicled the story of a girl who, two years ago at the age of 16, left her home in Michigan on an adventure that would eventually lead her to Tel Aviv — at least she hoped it would. Once at her destination, she planned to marry a Palestinian man she met online. The high school student didn’t reached her destination, but came close. After flying halfway around the world, she was detained by U.S. authorities in Amman, Jordan, had her passport confiscated and was sent back to the United States.

After reading the article, I couldn’t help but think that, if a 16-year-old was able to lure a then-20-year-old Palestinian man into an online love affair that almost culminated in marriage, a crop of older, wiser professional women with covert spying experience should be able to do the same job, but with even greater success.

An idea began percolating in my mind.

Instead of marriage, the intent would be to lure suspected members of Middle Eastern terrorist groups into online “love traps” of our own making.

To lead our online assault strategy, we can tap Dr. Neil Clark Warren and his team of matchmaking minds at eHarmony.com. They can assist the nation’s intelligence agencies in setting up a social networking site designed to attract jihad-crazy Muslims who are either members of or supporters of known terrorist organizations, including Hamas, Hezbollah, Al-Qaeda and others. We’ll call the project “JiHarmony.com.”

In much the same way as eHarmony.com narrows the field of potential mates from millions of candidates to a highly select group of singles with whom one shares deep levels of compatibility, JiHarmony.com will narrow the field of likely Islamic extremists down to a smaller number who share deep-seeded hatred for Western ideologies.

Unlink other sites, such as the Wanted by the FBI web site, that match criminals based on a picture and a paragraph, JiHarmony.com will identify likely terrorists based on their incompatibility with the most important areas of life — like Western values, character, intellect, sense of humor, spiritual beliefs, passion, and up to 24 other dimensions.Once we identify the terrorists based on information they submitted via the JiHarmony.com web site, we can set them up on “dates” with Western intelligence operatives posing as their compatibility “matches.”

You can figure out the rest from here. Let me know if you think it will work.

Though I received no feedback from anyone in the U.S. Intelligence Community about this idea, I find it hard to believe they wouldn’t implement it. After all, it’s BRILLIANT!  Isn’t it?

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Intel Boss ‘Truly Insane,’ According to Former CIA Director

In a McClatchy News article today, Marisa Taylor reports that Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. issued a new polygraph policy Sept. 14 which requires federal government agencies conducting polygraph exams to ask applicants and employees if they have leaked classified information to the media. Doing so places him among the “truly insane,” according to one former CIA director.

Former CIA Director John Deutch quoted in New York Times 12/10/1995.

Former CIA Director John Deutch quoted in New York Times 12/10/1995.

On page 6 of a New York Times article published Dec. 10, 1995, reporter Tim Weiner quoted former CIA Director John Deutch talking about the CIA, saying, “Their reliance on the polygraph is truly insane,” and I couldn’t agree more.

What Clapper, the nation’s top intelligence official, ignores by issuing a new polygraph policy and, more importantly, by remaining joined at the hip with backers of century-old polygraph technology, is a long list of polygraph failures.

In Chapter 15 of my second nonfiction book, The Clapper Memo, I not only challenge readers to conduct their own research of convicted spies such as John Anthony Walker Jr., Jonathan Jay Pollard, Ana Belen Montes, and other U.S. government employees, but I let them know what they’ll find — that is, that the vast majority of those convicted of spying for foreign governments had been subject to regular polygraph examinations as a condition of their federal government employment. Some spied for years and years before being caught! Edward Snowden is merely the most recent example of an intelligence professional with a high-level security clearance to make reliance on the polygraph appear foolish.

Further into the same chapter, I share details about other well-known top government officials and their feelings about the polygraph.

I cite an article published Dec. 20, 1985, in the Los Angeles Times. In it, Norman Kempster reported that George Schulz, then serving as President Ronald Reagan’s Secretary of State, was not a fan of the polygraph and, in fact, had threatened to resign rather than submit to a polygraph examination.

I also point to an article, published in the March 8, 1994, edition of The New York Times. In it, Ronald Kessler shared details about how former CIA Director R. James Woolsey seemed to harbor the same sentiment about the polygraph:

The day after the arrest of the accused spy Aldrich H. Ames was announced, the Director of Central Intelligence, R. James Woolsey, met with several hundred C.I.A. employees in the agency’s auditorium at Langley, Virginia. After recounting what employees already knew from the news media, Mr. Woolsey — whose address was seen on closed-circuit television by every C.I.A. employee — spent five minutes explaining why he himself had refused to take a polygraph test, as other recent directors had done. Besides the fact that political appointees are not required to take such tests, Mr. Woolsey said he remained “skeptical” about the polygraph’s effectiveness.

Why does Clapper stick with this highly-suspect technology? To answer that question, I conducted a four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of so-called credibility assessment technologies, including the polygraph. My findings appear inside The Clapper Memo, a book that has received rave reviews from several top-flight people whose names you might recognize.

To learn more about the findings of my investigation, read other posts about the book.

To understand everything I’ve uncovered, order a copy of The Clapper Memo.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.