Tag Archives: ‘Thirty Days of Hell in the Life of an Accused Army Officer’

Something’s Seriously Wrong When Military Justice System Sides With Psychics, Convicted Felons and Porn Queens

I’ve written many articles about cases involving military men falsely accused and, in many cases, wrongly convicted, of sexual assault. Today, however, I’m going to point you, my readers, to three cases that began with sexual assault allegations made against military men by three unique women: a psychic, a porn queen and a convicted felon.

Former Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart in Iraq.

Former Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart in Iraq. To read his story, order a copy of Three Days In August by clicking on the image above.

The first case involves similar allegations made against Air Force MSgt. Michael Silva. According to one news account, Silva’s case was the oldest yet in a scandal at Lackland AFB in San Antonio that saw 35 Basic Military Training instructors investigated for misconduct with 68 recruits and technical training students over a four-year period. His accuser is a woman who described herself as a “psychic medium” in a series of Twitter postings in October 2009. Interestingly, she made her allegations against Silva, a former BMT instructor at the base, a whopping 17 years after she had spent only three days as an Air Force trainee in his squadron. It was her claim about being a psychic that prompted me to ask the tongue-in-cheek question about this so-called psychic: “Shouldn’t she have known in advance if she was about to become the victim of a horrible crime?

You can read more about his case in a piece that appears under the headline, Social Media Postings Reveal Much About ‘Psychic Medium’ Who Accused AF Basic Training Instructor of Sexual Assault. To read other pieces about Silva’s case, which is under appeal at this time, click here.

Silva-Martin Coverage

The second case involves sexual assault allegations made against Army Maj. Christian “Kit” Martin by the woman to whom he thought he had been legally married. Only weeks before his military trial was set to begin at Fort Campbell, Ky., he learned the woman had entered a guilty plea before a Christian County (Ky.) judge on a felony charge of bigamy. In other words, she had admitted to having married Major Martin without telling him she was still married to another man. Despite the fact that Major Martin’s accuser and former “spouse” is a convicted felon and, due to the nature of the crime, a person who has lived many years under a cloud of falsehoods, the Army seems bent on following through with this career Army officer’s military trial at which he faces the possibility of a very long prison sentence if found guilty.

For a fairly-comprehensive look at this case through the end of September, read Thirty Days of Hell in the Life of an Accused Army Officer. To read other pieces about the case, click here.

The third case involves sexual assault allegations made against another military man — who I’m not yet ready to identify — by a woman who is now his ex-wife. Interestingly, his accuser turned into an entrepreneur of sorts soon after her husband was convicted and sentenced to prison. Her business? Adult entertainment. Though it’s difficult to understand the exact nature of what appears to be her multi-faceted business, I believe “wannabe porn queen” describes her well. Why? Because this moderately-attractive woman has, on her websites and social media pages, posted a plethora of photographs in which she is shown posing naked and semi-naked. One photo even shows her face situated only inches away from a man’s genitalia.

Though I’m waiting to collect a few more items before I break this story in full, I can point you to a letter written by a woman who is well-informed about the case. It appears under the headline, Wife Offers Details About Wrongly-Accused Husband’s Case.

The military justice cases highlighted above have caused me much concern, and they should be of immediate concern to all Americans who care about those who serve in uniform. Political correctness is killing our people and our readiness. Needless to say, I’ll continue to follow them and keep you apprised of new developments as they occur.

To read about my most-comprehensive investigation to date of a case of false sexual assault allegations, order a copy of Three Days In August. In this, my first nonfiction book, I chronicle the life story and wrongful conviction of a highly-decorated Army Special Forces Soldier and combat veteran who, as a Green Beret medic and Level 1 sniper, received one Bronze Star Medal, though he really earned two.

Show your support and help keep these articles coming by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same. To learn how to order signed copies, click here.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.

Attorneys Who Win Small Battles Might Win Legal War

An elite Army Ranger and attack helicopter pilot at Fort Campbell, Ky., Maj. Christian “Kit” Martin, 47, has flown some 1,000 combat flying hours. Nothing, however, could have prepared him for the battle he’s fighting now as he tries to avoid becoming a victim of the Pentagon’s sexual assault witch hunt that could send him to prison for 58 years* for something he did not do. Below, I share the opinions of two attorneys (who shall remain nameless) about Major Martin’s case — which involves false sexual assault allegations as well as Army prosecutors and commanders under political pressure to win a conviction at all cost — and about how the attorneys who win the small battles might win the legal war.

My cat, Butters, tries to predict the future by looking into his porcelain bowl.

This photo shows my cat, Butters, looking into his porcelain bowl in an effort to predict the future. Unfortunately, he’s about as reliable in predicting the future as the military justice system is in determining innocence and guilt.

ATTORNEY #1

“I’d like to pick your brain for just a moment,” I wrote in an email two days ago to a former top legal officer for one branch of the U.S. military. “I’m working on a story involving an Army major accused of sexual assault by a woman soon after he asked her for a divorce. I don’t describe her as the major’s wife, because she is now facing bigamy charges in Kentucky.”

I went on to explain that Major Martin had learned — after asking her for a divorce — that she had never divorced her first husband before marrying him. And then I asked my question:

“If the woman is found guilty or pleads guilty to bigamy, can the Department of the Army or Department of Defense sue her or prosecute her for anything, such as obtaining goods and services under false pretenses?”

I thanked him in advance for his thoughts on the matter and, as expected, received his reply early Monday afternoon:

“The short answer is that the Army or DoD would have to request the Department of Justice pursue any sort of recovery. The DoJ would likely send it to the local U.S. Attorney wherever he resides and do an analysis of the merits and the cost/benefit to pursue it. My guess (and it is just a guess) is that the U.S. Attorney would not pursue it.”

ATTORNEY #2

While some might say the attorney’s reply doesn’t bode well for Major Martin, another attorney sees reason for optimism in the major’s camp. He works in the criminal division of a U.S. Attorney’s office in a major U.S. city, and he offered a different view of the same situation.

He said an Army prosecutor with knowledge of a person’s breaking the law — for instance, obtaining goods and services (i.e., healthcare services and the benefits of discounted shopping at the post commissary and exchange facilities) under false pretenses (i.e., pretending to be a military spouse when one is not legally married to a member of the military) from the federal government — not only “has the authority (to initiate prosecution), (but) he has the obligation.” Further, he said the military prosecutor would be committing “a felony on his part” if he fails to act while having such knowledge.

Do the Army prosecutors have knowledge of wrongdoing by Major Martin’s accuser? I believe they do.

They are aware Katherine (Garber) Foster, assistant prosecutor in Christian County, Ky., conducted a thorough investigation that led to a bigamy charge based upon what she believes is rock-solid evidence she can use to prove Major Martin’s accuser committed bigamy.

In addition, they are aware Christian County Family Court Judge Jason Shea Fleming voided the marriage between Major Martin and his female accuser based upon evidence she never obtained a divorce from her first husband, the father of her two youngest children.

Will the prosecutors in Major Martin’s case — Maj. Jacob D. Bashore and Capt. James P. Garrett — use their authority and fulfill their obligation to report the woman’s apparent crime (i.e., impersonation of a military spouse and, in turn, the theft of goods and services from the U.S. Government) to the U.S. Attorney in Kentucky? I certainly hope so, because doing otherwise would not be very becoming of Army officers and gentlemen.

‘CHESS PIECES’ IN PLAY

Then again, there are a lot of “chess pieces” in play right now.

For instance, if local prosecutor Foster offers Major Martin’s accuser some sort of pre-trial diversion linked to a sentence of one year or longer, she would not serve any jail time unless or until she committed another crime, such as perjury, during the term of her diversion.

As I reported yesterday, Hopkinsville, Ky., civilian defense attorney Brandi Jones is not only attempting to prevent local prosecutor Foster from prosecuting the case against her client, Major Martin’s accuser, in civilian court, but she’s hoping Christian County Judge Andrew Self will agree to her request and push back her client’s trial date until after Major Martin’s military trial, expected to run Dec. 1 to 4.

Jones knows that, if she’s successful in both preventing Foster from testifying and in delaying her client’s trial, it’s highly unlikely Judge (Col.) Andrew Glass will allow any reference to bigamy and/or perjury allegations against the woman to be aired in his military courtroom during Major Martin’s military trial. And that would not bode well for the major. If, however, Judge Self refuses to delay Jones’ client’s trial, then Major Martin might have a chance of seeing his accuser explaining herself on the witness stand during his military trial. Of course, there are no guarantees, and he’s seen his witness requests denied before.

Stay tuned for updates!

For a recap of what took place during a recent one-month period in Major Martin’s life, read “Thirty Days of Hell in the Life of an Accused Army Officer.”

For all other articles about Major Martin’s case, click here.

Thanks in advance for reading and sharing this article and those to follow. Meanwhile, Please show your support by buying my books and encouraging your friends and loved ones to do the same.  To learn how to order signed copies, click here.

UPDATE 10/14/2015 at 2:17 p.m. Central: Less than two hours after publishing the article above, I received word that Major Martin’s accuser entered a guilty plea to a bigamy charge. Sentencing is set for Feb. 17. I hope the Army prosecutors are paying attention as she is now a convicted felon.

*UPDATE: After publishing this article, I learned Army prosecutors agreed to limit any possible punishment in this case to 10 years. A sign they have a weak case?”

UPDATE 12/7/2015 at 8:23 a.m. Central: A military judge continued the military trial date for Army Maj. Christian “Kit” Martin to sometime in March 2016, though no specific date has been set.

UPDATE 12/10/2015 at 11:12 a.m. Central: I’ve learned that Major Martin’s military trial date is set for March 14-18, 2016.

Click on image above to order Bob's books.

Click on image above to order Bob’s books.